none
"This copy of windows not genuine" after boot drive upgrade

    Question

  • Hi,

    I bought a new hard drive for my Win 7 (64-bit) PC. I cloned the existing boot drive to the new (larger) drive (using BackupExec System Recovery), then booted to the repair console and made the new drive 'C' and the old drive 'D' using DISKPART.

    Now, when I boot from the C drive, after logging in, I get to a blue screen with the message "This copy of windows is not genuine" in the bottom right-hand corner underneath the windows version & build info. There's nothing else on the screen -- just that text. I can't do anything -- no start menu, nothing. The only way I can get out is with Ctrl-Alt-Delete to log out, then I can shut down / restart from the log in screen.

    The system will boot from the old drive (D). But that doesn't help me, of course -- I want to boot from the new drive!

    How do I get to the point where I can boot normally from my new hard drive?

    Sunday, February 14, 2010 5:33 PM

Answers

  • Hello TheLimey,

      That is very strange, it is not expected Non-Genuine behavior to have Windows boot into a Blue Screen with just a Non-Genuine message without any sort of pop-up with option (such as Learn More Online and such). In addition, we did not include any Reduced Funtionality code in Windows 7.  The extent of Windows 7 Non-Genuine experience is a Black Background with a Non-Genuine message.  You should still have full access to the Start Button and all other Windows functionality.

      Since the Windows on the original Drive works without error, I can only assume that there was a problem with the backup image that was created and copied onto the new drive.  You may try contacting Windows Support (http://support.microsoft.com) but my feeling is that they will recommend you using the supported method of Installing Windows (using the Windows installer, not a 3rd party backup program) on the new drive.


    Sorry I couldn't be more help,
    Darin MS



    Monday, February 15, 2010 7:59 PM
    Owner

All replies

  • Nope, doesn't make any difference.

    Now, the computer will only boot if it has both sets of drives in it. If I boot with the old HD, it says "Not genuine" on the blue screen.

    If I boot with the new HD, same thing.

    if I boot with both HDs, Win 7 starts properly.
    • Proposed as answer by zsnipes Thursday, March 18, 2010 4:56 PM
    Sunday, February 14, 2010 8:58 PM
  • Hello TheLimey,

      That is very strange, it is not expected Non-Genuine behavior to have Windows boot into a Blue Screen with just a Non-Genuine message without any sort of pop-up with option (such as Learn More Online and such). In addition, we did not include any Reduced Funtionality code in Windows 7.  The extent of Windows 7 Non-Genuine experience is a Black Background with a Non-Genuine message.  You should still have full access to the Start Button and all other Windows functionality.

      Since the Windows on the original Drive works without error, I can only assume that there was a problem with the backup image that was created and copied onto the new drive.  You may try contacting Windows Support (http://support.microsoft.com) but my feeling is that they will recommend you using the supported method of Installing Windows (using the Windows installer, not a 3rd party backup program) on the new drive.


    Sorry I couldn't be more help,
    Darin MS



    Monday, February 15, 2010 7:59 PM
    Owner
  • Hi,
    It is indeed happen.
    I also faced the same issue here. It is indeed just the Light Blue Screen with few words (Not genuine) at the bottom right ONLY.

    It's most probably the Windows 7 originally in the Old HDD records its HDD Serial Number or its stated, once changed/upgrade the HDD it cannot find the original information, so it simply report it as NOT GENUINE. So lame....

    For my case, i usually make Images (using acronis true image) after fully install my any Windows (since Win98), if something wrong happens, i can simply restore the Images to the HDD, it can work instantly as fresh :)
    For this Windows 7 case, it does not happen for me anymore.
    I brought my new HDD & restore the Images to the New HDD, it detect my Windows is Not Genuine anymore.
    In the end after few days of figuring out the problem, i end up, Re-Install AGAIN ! everything from the scratch, so troublesome cause I have too many programs & settings where I fully customised before....

    Please, anyone got fixes for this "Change Hard Disk Drive for Windows 7 Ultimate (64 bit) make Windows Not Genuine in Light Blue Screen", please post up here or let me know, I desperately need this fixes.

    Thanks.
    Thursday, March 18, 2010 5:08 PM
  • Hello zsnipes,

    I understand that you encountered this problem when using Acronis TI to image your disk.

    Do you encounter the same problem when you use your Windows Ultimate's own image based backup program (Backup and Restore Center) to do the imaging?


    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Friday, March 19, 2010 4:26 AM
  • I have the same problem with a different imaging utility.  I used DriveImage XML to make the image of my 64GB SSD, and tried to restore it to a 320GB 5400rpm drive.  I got the exact same light blue screen.  I tried multiple times, and verified the image.  Still doesn't help.  Had to reinstall the whole thing.
    Tuesday, April 20, 2010 2:44 AM
  • Did you restore the hidden 100 meg part to the new drive or is it still on the old one?
    • Proposed as answer by bertmace26 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 2:22 PM
    Tuesday, April 20, 2010 3:35 AM
  • I have the same problem :(

    TheLimey, did you resolve the problem ?

    Thanks.


    Monday, May 31, 2010 1:26 PM
  • "vitalium" wrote in message news:22f3681d-133a-496e-94b0-57e9a74bd809...
    >I have the same problem :(
    >
     
    No you don't - you have a different PC.
    Please start a thread of your own, stating you problems, and include an
    MGADiag report.
    --
    Noel Paton
    CrashFixPC
     
    Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
    www.crashfixpc.co.uk
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Monday, May 31, 2010 1:32 PM
    Moderator
  • Did you restore the hidden 100 meg part to the new drive or is it still on the old one?


    I assumed it imaged the whole drive, even that 'partition' or whatever you call it.

    I am having the exact same issue by the way.  I would just reinstall but my manufacturer never gave me a disc...  Worked perfect before upgrading to a SSD.  Took me forever just to get it to boot without "missing BOOTMGR" and now this.  At least give me the option to enter my CD key, ffs...

    Tuesday, November 16, 2010 3:00 AM
  • Hello,

     

    I have the exact same problem. I have windows 7 ultimate 64bit. I cloned my 320gb to new 1tb using Norton Ghost 15 software. Then i removed my old drive and tried to boot from the new drive

    Now i get only this blue "windows 7 build 7600 This copy of windows is not genuine" and when i am trying to boot from my old hard drive the same problem comes again. I cant reinstall everything, i loose too much things. Microsft should come to my home and fix this. I will never buy windows anymore if even a hard drive change is made so difficult. 

    Friday, December 17, 2010 7:55 AM
  • "anttipantti" wrote in message news:2054dcf9-46db-4cb1-bbf9-3c837afee22f...

    Hello,

     

    I have the exact same problem. I have windows 7 ultimate 64bit. I cloned my 320gb to new 1tb using Norton Ghost 15 software. Then i removed my old drive and tried to boot from the new drive

    Now i get only this blue "windows 7 build 7600 This copy of windows is not genuine" and when i am trying to boot from my old hard drive the same problem comes again. I cant reinstall everything, i loose too much things. Microsft should come to my home and fix this. I will never buy windows anymore if even a hard drive change is made so difficult. 


    Please repost your own problem to your own new thread - and include your own MGADiag report....
    To properly analyse and solve problems with Activation and Validation, we need to see a full copy of the report produced by the MGADiag tool (download and save to desktop - http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012 )
    Once saved, run the tool.
    Click on the Continue button, which will produce the report.
    To copy the report to your response, click on the Copy button in the tool (ignore any error messages at this point), and then paste (using either r-click/Paste, or Ctrl+V ) into your response.
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Friday, December 17, 2010 11:51 PM
    Moderator
  • I am experiencing the exact same issue.   I used Microsoft's own image backup utility, restored to a larger hard drive (because I had outgrown my other), same message as you... not genuine.  On the system panel, it still shows that it is "activated.    I even performed a re-activation, which it seemed to accept, but still showing not genuine.  So mad.  Why does Microsoft even bother supplying a backup utility when it is worthless when trying to restore your system... who was the marketing genius behind this latest maneuver?  A person with a valid product should not have to go through this hassle.  Wonder how much money is being spent on support calls to Microsoft for legit customers experiencing the same issues.  Personally, I have spoken with 7+ people… some I even wonder if they knew how to spell “Windows” let alone accept support calls for it.  One “rocket scientist” told me I would have to uninstall and then reinstall my operating system. WHAT? I think they are trying to push us over to Apple or Linux.  I am a developer; instead of exploring developing applications for the Window 7 phone, I am just going to start developing applications for the DROID.  Google, I hear you calling…

    Wednesday, December 22, 2010 4:19 PM
  • "CharissaJB123" wrote in message news:0ad7856e-b99b-400a-b13c-61013f2e99e5...

    I am experiencing the exact same issue.   I used Microsoft's own image backup utility, restored to a larger hard drive (because I had outgrown my other), same message as you... not genuine.  On the system panel, it still shows that it is "activated.    I even performed a re-activation, which it seemed to accept, but still showing not genuine.  So mad.  Why does Microsoft even bother supplying a backup utility when it is worthless when trying to restore your system... who was the marketing genius behind this latest maneuver?  A person with a valid product should not have to go through this hassle.  Wonder how much money is being spent on support calls to Microsoft for legit customers experiencing the same issues.  Personally, I have spoken with 7+ people… some I even wonder if they knew how to spell “Windows” let alone accept support calls for it.  One “rocket scientist” told me I would have to uninstall and then reinstall my operating system. WHAT? I think they are trying to push us over to Apple or Linux.  I am a developer; instead of exploring developing applications for the Window 7 phone, I am just going to start developing applications for the DROID.  Google, I hear you calling…


    Please repost to a NEW thread of your own, and include an MGADiag report.
    To properly analyse and solve problems with Activation and Validation, we need to see a full copy of the report produced by the MGADiag tool (download and save to desktop - http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012 )
    Once saved, run the tool.
    Click on the Continue button, which will produce the report.
    To copy the report to your response, click on the Copy button in the tool (ignore any error messages at this point), and then paste (using either r-click/Paste, or Ctrl+V ) into your response.
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Thursday, December 23, 2010 4:41 AM
    Moderator
  • I too have the same issue and think it s ludicrous that Microsoft forces the hard drive to not change. That is ridiculous and absurd and Microsoft once again proves that their ability to think is extremely deficient. How truly LAME!!! I wish Microsoft would be reasonable. Why can't someone increase the size of their system hard drive?!?!?!?! I only wish Microsoft would read this and respond. 
    Sunday, January 30, 2011 1:44 AM
  • "dazz13" wrote in message news:576d29a1-367f-4fd6-ace5-1ad965e3c984...
    I too have the same issue and think it s ludicrous that Microsoft forces the hard drive to not change. That is ridiculous and absurd and Microsoft once again proves that their ability to think is extremely deficient. How truly LAME!!! I wish Microsoft would be reasonable. Why can't someone increase the size of their system hard drive?!?!?!?! I only wish Microsoft would read this and respond. 

    MS does not 'force the hard drive to not change'. You can do whatever you like with the size of your HD, or the number of HD's. What you can't do is mess around with the partitions, without risking some serious side-effects, one of which it a possible non-genuine message (which is easily fixed). Changing the HD identifier also has a small effect on activation - but is unlikely in itself to trigger an activation request.
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, January 30, 2011 4:53 AM
    Moderator
  • Many things other than changing the MB can trigger an activation request - but changing hardware alone (off the motherboard) is not usually enough, unless you also disable something like the onboard LAN sockets as well.

    The only hardware change guaranteed to cause an Activation request is the motherboard. Sometimes, even updating the motherboard drivers can trigger an activation request.

     


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, January 30, 2011 2:19 PM
    Moderator
  • Try going to your motherboard manufacturer's website, and checking there for drivers - they'll almost certainly have at least one set of drivers later than any on the DVD - and possible a large number. They will probably also have later ones than any offered by Windows Updates.
    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, January 30, 2011 2:39 PM
    Moderator
  • "Vegan Fanatic" wrote in message news:9ab5a286-69ac-4e33-912f-1869cdc08b94...

    I own an Asus M4A77D and the driver there is dated back when Windows 7 was still beta.

    Asus does have updated BIOS to support more recent processors that fit the AM3 socket.

     

    I am in no rush for a new MB, but when I upgraded to this board I had to activate. Had to use the phone activation but it was not a problem. Had to speak with a rep who asked if this was a second machine, and I told him I upgraded the motherboard.

    Then he gave me the codes to activate Windows 7 and I have used this board since. I bought it in April 2010 to be able to use my GTX 260 more effectively.

    Swapping video cards does not affect activation. I have a DOA 8600 GT, HD 2400 Pro, and the GTX 260. The review for the 8600 GT is very negative, I expect a video card to last >> 3 years.

     

     


    My MVP is for Windows XP, Vista and Windows 7 IT, and I am getting increasingly good with Visual Studio.

    Developer | Windows IT | Chess | Economics | Hardcore Games | Vegan Advocate | PC Reviews


    Duh?
     
    I see
    chipset drivers dated April 2010
    Audio drivers dated March 2010
    LAN drivers dated Nov 2009
    a number of updated utilities
    ....and that's only for Win 7

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, January 30, 2011 3:22 PM
    Moderator
  • "Vegan Fanatic" wrote in message news:de972c4b-15ae-4400-9c31-2887f825bc1b...

    Those driver packages are a rehash of the older ones.

    I tried then back when they came out.

     


    My MVP is for Windows XP, Vista and Windows 7 IT, and I am getting increasingly good with Visual Studio.

    Developer | Windows IT | Chess | Economics | Hardcore Games | Vegan Advocate | PC Reviews

    The only reasons for a driver 'rehash' are either to fix a bug or enable new compatibility.
     
    I just downloaded the LAN drivers, and the file specifically contains Win7 drivers dated AFTER Win7 went RTM. and so could not have been included on the Win7 disk.
     
     
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, January 30, 2011 4:02 PM
    Moderator
  • What an ignorant answer!  If we are completely locked out of the restored partition with a blank screen saying This copy of Windows is not genuine, how are we supposed to run an Activation tool on it an post an MGADiag report???  THINK!

    Monday, April 18, 2011 8:35 PM
  • Same problem here.  I used Drive Image XML to back up 3 days ago.  So I know my hardware and motherboard drivers are the same.  I also restored the same image, using the same software, to a different hard drive successfully 4 days ago.  But when trying to restore it to another hard drive I got the BCD errors.  I repaired the bootmrg, then got the "Preparing your desktop" message, followed by the WGA message.

    With all of these images (same OS & computer in various stages of repair) I have had the same 3 hard drives installed.  Each of the hard drives has one of the images as it's first, primary partition (for safety in case I screw something up.)  I have always been able to boot into each hard drive without any problems.  But I always have to do a Bootrec /fixmbr & /rebuildbcd if I format and re-image any of the drives.

    Now suddenly, I get locked out with a WGA message... on a year old image... with no Internet connection.  How is this possible? 

    Monday, April 18, 2011 9:09 PM
  • "mmmelaney" wrote in message news:9a17b314-8328-4bc9-9bd9-e6d923b7ce0e...

    Same problem here.  I used Drive Image XML to back up 3 days ago.  So I know my hardware and motherboard drivers are the same.  I also restored the same image, using the same software, to a different hard drive successfully 4 days ago.  But when trying to restore it to another hard drive I got the BCD errors.  I repaired the bootmrg, then got the "Preparing your desktop" message, followed by the WGA message.

    With all of these images (same OS & computer in various stages of repair) I have had the same 3 hard drives installed.  Each of the hard drives has one of the images as it's first, primary partition (for safety in case I screw something up.)  I have always been able to boot into each hard drive without any problems.  But I always have to do a Bootrec /fixmbr & /rebuildbcd if I format and re-image any of the drives.

    Now suddenly, I get locked out with a WGA message... on a year old image... with no Internet connection.  How is this possible? 


    No - you do NOT know that everything is the same - there may be problems induced by hardware failure
    To properly analyse and solve problems with Activation and Validation, we need to see a full copy of the report produced by the MGADiag tool (download and save to desktop - http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012 )
    Once saved, run the tool.
    Click on the Continue button, which will produce the report.
    To copy the report to your response, click on the Copy button in the tool (ignore any error messages at this point), and then paste (using either r-click/Paste, or Ctrl+V ) into your response.
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Monday, April 18, 2011 9:34 PM
    Moderator
  • "Vegan Fanatic" wrote in message news:f821b51a-0617-4927-8995-878bcb671765...

    When I upgraded my MB to a more recent model, I had to install Windows fresh. I had to activate by phone though.

    WGA messages will require activation.

     


    No they won't.
    Learn what you want to talk about before opening your keyboard.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Monday, April 18, 2011 9:34 PM
    Moderator
  • "mmmelaney" wrote in message news:58bdf71a-0052-428d-af0d-bdbdc6cad126...

    What an ignorant answer!  If we are completely locked out of the restored partition with a blank screen saying This copy of Windows is not genuine, how are we supposed to run an Activation tool on it an post an MGADiag report???  THINK!


    Please start a NEW thread of your OWN - with DETAILS or your own problem.
    No two computers are the same once they are out of the box - and no two problems are the same.
    the more we know about YOUR problem the more we can help.
     
    You always have the option to go elsewhere if you don't like the advice in these peer-to peer forums.
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Monday, April 18, 2011 9:34 PM
    Moderator
  • Question:

    When booting the restored image on a new drive what is important?

    a)The SATA port the drive is plugged into

    b)The number of drives connected compared to the number when the image was made

    c)The drive order

    d)The drive number in the bios (but I've eliminated this because I've re-imaged to every one of them in the past.)

    e)I've also eliminated partition size and configuration because it is never the same in any two drives -- not a problem in the past, except the need to do manual Bootrec repair.

    __________________

    Backgroud:

    I have changed the drive letters and the drive numbers a lot lately, but until now, it hasn't been a problem -- except for the need to manually repair bootmgr.

    I don't think it's a motherboard driver problem because I got the same error with an image which had old chipset drivers, and one with new chipset drivers.

    It's not the 100mb boot partition because all of my drives have the same boot configuration.  I'm just swapping one version of the same Win7 installation for another, between hard drives.  And like I said, I've done it successfully in the past.

    It's got to be the hard drives numbers -- some minuscule detail that I'm not aware of.

    When restoring and booting to the new image I normally have one hard drive plugged in to ensure that it is drive 0.  But it is impossible to do each backup from drive 0, since I need all 3 hard drives running most of the time.  And all of the images are on 1 drive so sometimes I have to have 2 drives connected while restoring.  Again, this didn't seem to matter in the past!

    Monday, April 18, 2011 9:35 PM
  • "mmmelaney" wrote in message news:56df8db3-768c-44fa-adf5-855a289291ac...

    Question:

    When booting the restored image on a new drive what is important?

    a)The SATA port the drive is plugged into

    b)The number of drives connected compared to the number when the image was made

    c)The drive order

    d)The drive number in the bios (but I've eliminated this because I've re-imaged to every one of them in the past.)

    e)I've also eliminated partition size and configuration because it is never the same in any two drives -- not a problem in the past, except the need to do manual Bootrec repair.

    __________________

    Backgroud:

    I have changed the drive letters and the drive numbers a lot lately, but until now, it hasn't been a problem -- except for the need to manually repair bootmgr.

    I don't think it's a motherboard driver problem because I got the same error with an image which had old chipset drivers, and one with new chipset drivers.

    It's not the 100mb boot partition because all of my drives have the same boot configuration.  I'm just swapping one version of the same Win7 installation for another, between hard drives.  And like I said, I've done it successfully in the past.

    It's got to be the hard drives numbers -- some minuscule detail that I'm not aware of.

    When restoring and booting to the new image I normally have one hard drive plugged in to ensure that it is drive 0.  But it is impossible to do each backup from drive 0, since I need all 3 hard drives running most of the time.  And all of the images are on 1 drive so sometimes I have to have 2 drives connected while restoring.  Again, this didn't seem to matter in the past!


    a) yes - and no - if the BIOS can change the boot order by SATA channel then yes.
    b) No - so long as the Boot and System Drives are in the same position.
    c) Define 'Boot Order' The important thing in terms of Windows is the disk and partition information - so long as the Boot and System drives are the same the rest can vary.
    d) 'Drive Number' ?
    e) There may be an issue if the drives are not tagged the same - a decent partition manager should be able to adjust the tags so that the old and new partitions are the same.
     
    Changing drive letters on System or Boot drives may totally confuse the system - not to mention the user. Note that the System and Boot drives are not necessarily the same thing, and in fact in a default installation of Win7 are by design different - the System drive is a hidden partition of around 100MB while the Boot drive is the 'rest' of the disk. (very counter-intuitive!!)
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Monday, April 18, 2011 9:49 PM
    Moderator
  • One more detail.  Like another poster here I am using a retail copy of Win7 Ultimate on a Dell desktop with the original motherboard and bios.  I wonder if part of the problem is the bios reading as an OEM device that came with a Dell copy of WinXP originally.  Basically it doesn't like having a retail copy of Windows on it rather than a Dell OEM copy maybe?


    Monday, April 18, 2011 9:52 PM
  • "mmmelaney" wrote in message news:5baf635e-ca40-4e03-afbd-60b5f35c13e3...

    One more detail.  Like another poster here I am using a retail copy of Win7 Ultimate on a Dell desktop with the original motherboard and bios.  I wonder if part of the problem is the bios reading as an OEM device that came with a Dell copy of WinXP originally.  Basically it doesn't like having a retail copy of Windows on it rather than a Dell OEM copy maybe?



    A Retail disk takes no notice of the BIOS SLIC table - it's only an OEM disk (and certain Volume License Keys) that do.
     
    It's not up to the BIOS which OS it accepts - it's down to the OS which BIOS it accepts.
    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Monday, April 18, 2011 9:59 PM
    Moderator