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What is a good course to start with?

    Question

  • I am 16 years old and want to get in to the I.T field. What would be a good place to start at? I just really want to lean more then the basic stuff.
    Friday, February 08, 2013 3:08 PM

Answers

  • I suggest that you take a look at the free courses in the Microsoft Virtual Academy (MVA):

    http://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com/Studies/SearchResult.aspx

    Use the search features of the site to look for the topics that interest you, and then pick up one or more courses of level "100" to get started; you can then progress into higher levels.

    Friday, February 08, 2013 5:21 PM
  • Hi Brandon,

    Welcome to the forum. Although this is a Microsoft forum, my suggestion will differ from that of my colleagues because I do not recommend a vendor-specific introduction to IT. Instead, I recommend a broad approach which teaches the basics first, in a vendor-neutral manner, before progressing to more advanced vendor-specific technologies later as required.

    This is because without a solid understanding of the fundamentals, it will be more difficult to grasp the more advanced concepts you will encounter later on in Microsoft or any other training.

    Therefore, I would suggest you consider the A+ certification program from CompTIA, the Computing Technology Industry Association. The A+ is the primary entry level certification in the IT industry. It is a vendor-neutral credential that is recognized throughout the industry, and is currently held by approximately 900,000 IT professionals. Additionally, it can also earn you college credits at certain schools.

    Should you attain this certification, you will be well on your way to a career in IT. Alternatively, should you study the A+ course but choose not to pursue formal certification, you will still have gained valuable technical knowledge, way beyond the "basic stuff."

    I hope this information proves useful to you, and I wish you every success in your pursuits.

    James

    Monday, February 11, 2013 3:19 PM

All replies

  • I suggest that you take a look at the free courses in the Microsoft Virtual Academy (MVA):

    http://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com/Studies/SearchResult.aspx

    Use the search features of the site to look for the topics that interest you, and then pick up one or more courses of level "100" to get started; you can then progress into higher levels.

    Friday, February 08, 2013 5:21 PM
  • Okay i am looking at the Windows Server 2012: Storage. But am a little confused. It says that i will need how to know how to combine multiple hard drives or solid state drives but i only have one hard drive so can i even do the lesson?
    Saturday, February 09, 2013 1:08 AM
  • Yes, you can follow the lesson. The MVA courses explain the theory and use videos to demonstrate the concepts, so you can sit back and watch the video.

    If you later want to practice what you learnt, you will normally do it on a virtual machine. Use some virtualization technoloy, such as Hyper-V, to create a virtual machine with Windows 2012. Then, attach several virtual drives to the virtual machine. These virtual drives are just files on your primary (and only) drive, with the extension ".vhd". Once you boot into the virtual machine, from its point of view it will look like it has several drives attached. After you finish your practice, you can simply delete the .vhd's and the VM files, and your computer will be "clean" and not affected by any experiments you did.

    Saturday, February 09, 2013 7:44 AM
  • You want to go towards Hardware/(Software Development/Support).

    Thanks, Durgesh Chaudhary. http://home.techphernalia.com

    Monday, February 11, 2013 9:12 AM
  • Hi Brandon,

    Welcome to the forum. Although this is a Microsoft forum, my suggestion will differ from that of my colleagues because I do not recommend a vendor-specific introduction to IT. Instead, I recommend a broad approach which teaches the basics first, in a vendor-neutral manner, before progressing to more advanced vendor-specific technologies later as required.

    This is because without a solid understanding of the fundamentals, it will be more difficult to grasp the more advanced concepts you will encounter later on in Microsoft or any other training.

    Therefore, I would suggest you consider the A+ certification program from CompTIA, the Computing Technology Industry Association. The A+ is the primary entry level certification in the IT industry. It is a vendor-neutral credential that is recognized throughout the industry, and is currently held by approximately 900,000 IT professionals. Additionally, it can also earn you college credits at certain schools.

    Should you attain this certification, you will be well on your way to a career in IT. Alternatively, should you study the A+ course but choose not to pursue formal certification, you will still have gained valuable technical knowledge, way beyond the "basic stuff."

    I hope this information proves useful to you, and I wish you every success in your pursuits.

    James

    Monday, February 11, 2013 3:19 PM