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Link-Layer Topology Discovery Mapper I/O Driver and Responder

    Question

  • Hello,
    I have unbound IPV6 from my NICs, but still getting an IPV6 response when pinging a dns name... both server have IPV6 'unchecked' in their nic's properties. Both servers involved are 2008 sp2. I noticed these 2 items in the list:

    - Link-Layer Topology Discovery Mapper I/O Driver
    - Link-Layer Topology Discovery Responder

    1. what are these for?
    2. are they specific to IPV6 also?

    I did notice there are DNS entries for the IPV6 addresses but didn't wnat ot just delete them right away without doing a little digging first... I assume they self-registered before I unbound ipv6 from them... but even if these records are there, then I can how a ping of the dns name may 'resolve' to that ipv6 address but how can I actually be getting a response?!? both servers have ipv6 unbound?
    lundi 10 août 2009 15:29

Réponses

  •  At a basic function level, LLTD(Link-Layer Topology Discovery) gives users a graphical representation of their home network topology.  In addition to the network map, LLTD offers network device manufacturers a standard way of ensuring that their devices are easily viewed and accessible to their users.  Windows Vista enables the Network Map by default when a user is in a location designated as “Home.”   However, LLTD and, therefore, the Network Map are both disabled by default in “Work” and “Public” locations.

    You will receive a message inside the Network Map (Control Panel -> Network and Sharing Center -> Network Map) if the map is disabled.  As long as your network policy (group policy) does not prohibit it, enabling the Network Map on a local machine is simply a matter of enabling the right setting in the local computer policy.  “Network mapping is disabled by default on domain networks.  Your network administrator can use Group Policy to enable mapping.”

    Beyond offering users the convenience of having a visual representation and providing right-click access to information about the devices, the LLTD Responder also plays an important role in responding to, and taking part in, network diagnostics.  LLTD helps to make distributed and coordinated network diagnostics possible, and if you are creating home network devices, you should strongly consider implementing an LLTD responder.

    By using Group Policy, you can disable the responder altogether, or change the location types in which it is allowed to run.

    Membership in the local Administrators group, or equivalent, is the minimum required to complete this procedure.

    To enable or disable the LLTD Responder by using Group Policy
    1. Start Group Policy Management Console (GPMC). To do so, click Start, and then in the Start Search box, type gpmc.msc.

    2. In the navigation pane, open the following folders: Local Computer Policy, Computer Configuration, Administrative Templates, Network, and Link-Layer Topology Discovery.

    3. In the details pane, double-click Turn on Responder (RSPNDR) driver.

    4. To disable the responder component completely, click Disabled, and then click OK.

    5. To enable the responder component, click Enabled, and then select one or more of the following:

      • Allow operation while in domain
      • Allow operation while in public network
      • Prohibit operation while in private network

    Click OK to save your changes.

    To enable or disable the LLTD Mapper I/O by using Group Policy

    1. Open Group Policy Management Editor. To do so, click Start, and then in the Start Search box, type mmc gpedit.msc.

    2. In the navigation pane, open the following folders: Local Computer Policy, Computer Configuration, Administrative Templates, Network, and Link-Layer Topology Discovery.

    3. In the details pane, double-click Turn on Mapper I/O (LLTDIO) driver.

    4. To disable the Mapper I/O component, click Disabled, and then click OK.

    5. To enable the Mapper I/O component, click Enabled, and then select one or more of the following:

      • Allow operation while in domain
      • Allow operation while in public network
      • Prohibit operation while in private network

    Click OK to save your changes.

    If there are dns entrys of ipv6 adresses in your dns-server, you can resolve those, but with pinging you should get a time-out, e.g.


    Certifications: MCSA 2003 MCSE 2003

    lundi 10 août 2009 17:57

Toutes les réponses

  •  At a basic function level, LLTD(Link-Layer Topology Discovery) gives users a graphical representation of their home network topology.  In addition to the network map, LLTD offers network device manufacturers a standard way of ensuring that their devices are easily viewed and accessible to their users.  Windows Vista enables the Network Map by default when a user is in a location designated as “Home.”   However, LLTD and, therefore, the Network Map are both disabled by default in “Work” and “Public” locations.

    You will receive a message inside the Network Map (Control Panel -> Network and Sharing Center -> Network Map) if the map is disabled.  As long as your network policy (group policy) does not prohibit it, enabling the Network Map on a local machine is simply a matter of enabling the right setting in the local computer policy.  “Network mapping is disabled by default on domain networks.  Your network administrator can use Group Policy to enable mapping.”

    Beyond offering users the convenience of having a visual representation and providing right-click access to information about the devices, the LLTD Responder also plays an important role in responding to, and taking part in, network diagnostics.  LLTD helps to make distributed and coordinated network diagnostics possible, and if you are creating home network devices, you should strongly consider implementing an LLTD responder.

    By using Group Policy, you can disable the responder altogether, or change the location types in which it is allowed to run.

    Membership in the local Administrators group, or equivalent, is the minimum required to complete this procedure.

    To enable or disable the LLTD Responder by using Group Policy
    1. Start Group Policy Management Console (GPMC). To do so, click Start, and then in the Start Search box, type gpmc.msc.

    2. In the navigation pane, open the following folders: Local Computer Policy, Computer Configuration, Administrative Templates, Network, and Link-Layer Topology Discovery.

    3. In the details pane, double-click Turn on Responder (RSPNDR) driver.

    4. To disable the responder component completely, click Disabled, and then click OK.

    5. To enable the responder component, click Enabled, and then select one or more of the following:

      • Allow operation while in domain
      • Allow operation while in public network
      • Prohibit operation while in private network

    Click OK to save your changes.

    To enable or disable the LLTD Mapper I/O by using Group Policy

    1. Open Group Policy Management Editor. To do so, click Start, and then in the Start Search box, type mmc gpedit.msc.

    2. In the navigation pane, open the following folders: Local Computer Policy, Computer Configuration, Administrative Templates, Network, and Link-Layer Topology Discovery.

    3. In the details pane, double-click Turn on Mapper I/O (LLTDIO) driver.

    4. To disable the Mapper I/O component, click Disabled, and then click OK.

    5. To enable the Mapper I/O component, click Enabled, and then select one or more of the following:

      • Allow operation while in domain
      • Allow operation while in public network
      • Prohibit operation while in private network

    Click OK to save your changes.

    If there are dns entrys of ipv6 adresses in your dns-server, you can resolve those, but with pinging you should get a time-out, e.g.


    Certifications: MCSA 2003 MCSE 2003

    lundi 10 août 2009 17:57
  • Hi, thanks for the response.

    1. so are these specific to ipv6? or do they work with ipv4 also?

    2. I do get responses from the pings? When viewing 'status' of the nic it states IPV6 Connectivity 'limited', what does that mean? without ipv6 bound to any nic how do I have any ipv6 connectivity?
    lundi 10 août 2009 19:15
  • 1. It works with both IPv4 and IPv6

    2. yes, each NIC card has link local IPv6 address which is equivalent to APIPA in IPv4. 


    Munish

    lundi 22 octobre 2012 01:22