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Partion Size over 2TB

    Vraag

  • Dear all expert

    I have a new Storage with 9T disk space (750G SATA harddisk x 12). i would like to assign one partion with Raid 5, does NTFS support over 2TB disk space for one partion? Is that have need to convert GPT? any drawback using this than basic disk?

    vrijdag 16 januari 2009 9:27

Antwoorden

  •  

    The following are a few limitations of NTFS:

    Reserved File Names
    Though the file system supports paths up to about 32767 Unicode characters[34] with each path component (directory or filename) up to 255 characters[34] long, certain names are unusable, since NTFS stores its metadata in regular (albeit hidden and for the most part inaccessible) files; accordingly, user files cannot use these names. These files are all in the root directory of a volume (and are reserved only for that directory). The names are: $MFT, $MFTMirr, $LogFile, $Volume, $AttrDef, . (dot), $Bitmap, $Boot, $BadClus, $Secure, $Upcase, and $Extend;[2] . (dot) and $Extend are both directories; the others are files.
    Maximum Volume Size
    In theory, the maximum NTFS volume size is 264-1 clusters. However, the maximum NTFS volume size as implemented in Windows XP Professional is 232-1 clusters. For example, using 64 KiB clusters, the maximum NTFS volume size is 256 TiB minus 64 KiB. Using the default cluster size of 4 KiB, the maximum NTFS volume size is 16 TiB minus 4 KiB. Because partition tables on master boot record (MBR) disks only support partition sizes up to 2 TiB, dynamic or GPT volumes must be used to create bootable NTFS volumes over 2 TiB.
    Maximum File Size
    Theoretical: 16 EiB minus 1 KiB (264 − 210 bytes). Implementation: 16 TiB minus 64 KiB (244 − 216 bytes)
    Alternate Data Streams
    Windows system calls may—or may not—handle alternate data streams.[2] Depending on the operating system, utility and remote file system, a file transfer might silently strip data streams.[2] A safe way of copying or moving files is to use the BackupRead and BackupWrite system calls, which allow programs to enumerate streams, to verify whether each stream should be written to the destination volume and to knowingly skip offending streams.[2]
    Maximum path length
    An absolute path may be up to 32767 characters[34] long; a relative path is limited to 255 characters.
    maandag 19 januari 2009 3:30
  • Dear Customer,

     

    Thank you for your post.

     

    Based on my research, the issue you’re experiencing is: Issue with disk larger than 2 TB on Windows 2000 Server . There is No support for disks larger than 2TB in Windows 2000. In Windows Server 2003 SP1 we can only upgrade RAW disks to GPT - no partitions.

     

    The following article gives answer to your question.
    Large Logical Unit Support and (Windows Support for Logical Units Larger than 2 TB)

    http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/LUN_SP1.mspx#EBB
    <http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/LUN_SP1.mspx>

    Note: Disk devices with more than 2 TB of disk space must be converted to GPT format for all of the disk space to be usable.
    If the device uses MBR format, the disk space beyond 2 TB will be unusable.

    Please read the following article on Using GPT Drives:
    <http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/GPT-on-x64.mspx>

    Introduction to Storage Technologies
    <http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/stor-tech.mspx>

    Reference article for disk management.

    Article ID : 140365 Default Cluster Size for FAT and NTFS
    <http://support.microsoft.com/kb/140365/EN-US/>

    Server Clusters: Storage Best Practices for Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003
    <http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windowsserver2003/technologies/clustering/storbp.mspx>

    Large Logical Unit Support and Windows Server 2003 SP1
    <http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/LUN_SP1.mspx>

    Article ID : 297800 HOW TO: Use the Diskpart.efi Utility to Create a GUID Partition Table Partition on a Raw Disk in Windows
    <http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=KB;EN-US;297800>

    Chapter 16 of the Extensible Firmware Interface specification defines the GUID Partition Table format. This document is available at the following Intel Web site:
    <http://developer.intel.com/technology/efi/download.htm/misc/cpyright.htm/misc/cpyright.htm>

     

    Hope the above information helps. If you have any further questions or concerns, please feel free to let me know. I am happy to be of assistance.

     

    Sincerely,


    Tom Zhang

     

    vrijdag 23 januari 2009 9:37

Alle reacties

  • Maximum Sizes on NTFS Volumes

    In theory, the maximum NTFS volume size is 2 64 clusters. However, there are limitations to the maximum size of a volume, such as volume tables. By industry standards, volume tables are limited to 2 32 sectors.

    Sector size, another limitation, is typically 512 bytes. While sector sizes might increase in the future, the current size puts a limit on a single volume of 2 terabytes (2 32 * 512 bytes, or 2 41 bytes). For now, 2 terabytes is considered the practical limit for both physical and logical volumes using NTFS.

    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windows2000serv/reskit/prork/prdf_fls_pxjh.mspx?mfr=true

     

    Per our understanding, it should be most of common hardware storage can't create more than 2TB volume.As a result, if you really want to use the volume more than 2TB. it is necessa using Dymainc Disk to extend the Volume.

    vrijdag 16 januari 2009 17:01
  •  

    The following are a few limitations of NTFS:

    Reserved File Names
    Though the file system supports paths up to about 32767 Unicode characters[34] with each path component (directory or filename) up to 255 characters[34] long, certain names are unusable, since NTFS stores its metadata in regular (albeit hidden and for the most part inaccessible) files; accordingly, user files cannot use these names. These files are all in the root directory of a volume (and are reserved only for that directory). The names are: $MFT, $MFTMirr, $LogFile, $Volume, $AttrDef, . (dot), $Bitmap, $Boot, $BadClus, $Secure, $Upcase, and $Extend;[2] . (dot) and $Extend are both directories; the others are files.
    Maximum Volume Size
    In theory, the maximum NTFS volume size is 264-1 clusters. However, the maximum NTFS volume size as implemented in Windows XP Professional is 232-1 clusters. For example, using 64 KiB clusters, the maximum NTFS volume size is 256 TiB minus 64 KiB. Using the default cluster size of 4 KiB, the maximum NTFS volume size is 16 TiB minus 4 KiB. Because partition tables on master boot record (MBR) disks only support partition sizes up to 2 TiB, dynamic or GPT volumes must be used to create bootable NTFS volumes over 2 TiB.
    Maximum File Size
    Theoretical: 16 EiB minus 1 KiB (264 − 210 bytes). Implementation: 16 TiB minus 64 KiB (244 − 216 bytes)
    Alternate Data Streams
    Windows system calls may—or may not—handle alternate data streams.[2] Depending on the operating system, utility and remote file system, a file transfer might silently strip data streams.[2] A safe way of copying or moving files is to use the BackupRead and BackupWrite system calls, which allow programs to enumerate streams, to verify whether each stream should be written to the destination volume and to knowingly skip offending streams.[2]
    Maximum path length
    An absolute path may be up to 32767 characters[34] long; a relative path is limited to 255 characters.
    maandag 19 januari 2009 3:30
  • http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/GPT-on-x64.mspx

     

    How about using GPT,?? i am searching this from microsof, which support for windows 2003 service pack 1 later, does you know NTF can support GPT

    maandag 19 januari 2009 9:34
  •  

    The Windows Server 2003 SP1 release increases the maximum amount still further. For example, the maximum size of a basic volume (using GPT partitions) is 18EB; with NTFS it is 256TB. The maximum size of dynamic volume (using GPT partitions) is either 18EB or 32*18EB; with NTFS it is 256TB. For further details, refer to the Windows Server 2003 Deployment Kit.

     

    Note:

    Microsoft Support GPT partitions for "data volume" on x86 & x64, it does not support use for boot partitions.

     

     

     

    donderdag 22 januari 2009 0:55
  • Dear Customer,

     

    Thank you for your post.

     

    Based on my research, the issue you’re experiencing is: Issue with disk larger than 2 TB on Windows 2000 Server . There is No support for disks larger than 2TB in Windows 2000. In Windows Server 2003 SP1 we can only upgrade RAW disks to GPT - no partitions.

     

    The following article gives answer to your question.
    Large Logical Unit Support and (Windows Support for Logical Units Larger than 2 TB)

    http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/LUN_SP1.mspx#EBB
    <http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/LUN_SP1.mspx>

    Note: Disk devices with more than 2 TB of disk space must be converted to GPT format for all of the disk space to be usable.
    If the device uses MBR format, the disk space beyond 2 TB will be unusable.

    Please read the following article on Using GPT Drives:
    <http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/GPT-on-x64.mspx>

    Introduction to Storage Technologies
    <http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/stor-tech.mspx>

    Reference article for disk management.

    Article ID : 140365 Default Cluster Size for FAT and NTFS
    <http://support.microsoft.com/kb/140365/EN-US/>

    Server Clusters: Storage Best Practices for Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003
    <http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windowsserver2003/technologies/clustering/storbp.mspx>

    Large Logical Unit Support and Windows Server 2003 SP1
    <http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/LUN_SP1.mspx>

    Article ID : 297800 HOW TO: Use the Diskpart.efi Utility to Create a GUID Partition Table Partition on a Raw Disk in Windows
    <http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=KB;EN-US;297800>

    Chapter 16 of the Extensible Firmware Interface specification defines the GUID Partition Table format. This document is available at the following Intel Web site:
    <http://developer.intel.com/technology/efi/download.htm/misc/cpyright.htm/misc/cpyright.htm>

     

    Hope the above information helps. If you have any further questions or concerns, please feel free to let me know. I am happy to be of assistance.

     

    Sincerely,


    Tom Zhang

     

    vrijdag 23 januari 2009 9:37