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How to keep the system disk clean? RRS feed

  • Question

  • The system disk on my 16-month old server is issuing "low space" messages.   Since I haven't installed any programs on the server, I assume the space is filling up with Windows Update files.  

    When I click the message to clean up the disk, it offers to compress the files but a) that doesn't do anything to all these Windows Updates, and b) I'm not sure I want that; what's the point of keeping these old files anyway?  Is there some way to configure things so that it automatically deletes updates and logs that are more than a couple of weeks old?

    Saturday, October 23, 2010 2:26 PM

All replies

  • If you login locally or via Remotedesktop, you can check in Windows Explorer, if drive C: is the drive, which is full.

    Often it is a logfile, which is oversized. Those can find in Start/Run/%qlogs%. Check in the biggest file, which is the problem reported to cause it growing uncontrolled. After that delete the file.

    If system disk refers to the D: drive, did you at any time copy data to D:\shares on the server instead of using the UNC path?

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Saturday, October 23, 2010 5:30 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Olaf,

    What's considered to be "oversized"?  I have at least 20files that are 300,000K+ and they all seem to have been generated in the past 10 days.   Can I just delete all 444 logs?

    Saturday, October 23, 2010 7:11 PM
  • Hi Olaf,

    What's considered to be "oversized"?  I have at least 20files that are 300,000K+ and they all seem to have been generated in the past 10 days.   Can I just delete all 444 logs?

    Yes, you can delete the logs.  However, you need to determine what the problem is (otherwise the logs will just grow again).
    Saturday, October 23, 2010 7:50 PM
    Moderator
  •  Sorry, I don't understand this response at all.   How exactly is the user supposed to "determine what the problem is"?  The product is marketed as a hands-off consumer system with virtually no troubleshooting tools.   It isn't even possible to open one of these logs to see what's there because the files are too large for Notepad.   If MS expects users to have to display them, where's the viewer?

     

     

    Sunday, October 24, 2010 1:37 PM
  • Sorry, I don't understand this response at all.   How exactly is the user supposed to "determine what the problem is"?   
    One way would be to delete them, then if/when they start growing again, open them before they get too big for Notepad to handle.

    The product is marketed as a hands-off consumer system with virtually no troubleshooting tools.   It isn't even possible to open one of these logs to see what's there because the files are too large for Notepad.   If MS expects users to have to display them, where's the viewer?

    You're not "expected" to do that at all.  If you are having problems with the server, the "expected" (meaning supported) method to fix is Server Reinstallation.  The point was simply that if they are growing unexpectedly now (which they are as that's definitely not normal), it will most likely continue to happen until you figure out the underlying problem (or just reinstall WHS).
    Sunday, October 24, 2010 6:39 PM
    Moderator
  • One way would be to delete them, then if/when they start growing again, open them before they get too big for Notepad to handle
    I'm not sure we're on the same page; the logs I'm seeming are not "growing", they are being generated once a day at that size -- there is no catching them while they are small. In any case, how am I, or any user,  to know what qualifies as an "oversized" log.  What is a "normal" sized log and how do users know that? 
    You're not "expected" to do that at all.  If you are having problems with the server, the "expected" (meaning supported) method to fix is Server Reinstallation.  The point was simply that if they are growing unexpectedly now (which they are as that's definitely not normal), it will most likely continue to happen until you figure out the underlying problem (or just reinstall WHS).

    Again, I don't understand how anyone is supposed to "figure out the underlying problem" without some sort of troubleshooting tools.   The only thing the user knows is that the system is saying it's running out of space ...on a disk that the user doesn't control.  If the user is supposed to reinstall when that happens, where is the documentation to tell him to do that? 
    Monday, October 25, 2010 12:34 AM
  • If you purchased Windows Home Server you got some documentation from an OEM (i.e. HP, Acer, ...)

    The hints given here to look into the files is only to avoid the more or less painful process of reinstalling/recovering the server with all the updates, reconfiguration needs and potential risk of data loss in case of misunderstanding the process.

    Since these log files are text files, they are human readable. If you see a lot of errors there, posting one or a few of them and the file names here could be helpful for diagnostic.

    The biggest files on one server here are qsm logs with 40 MByte size, the total size of all log files is 328 MB, on the other its 45 MB/378 MB total.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Monday, October 25, 2010 11:36 AM
    Moderator