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Can WHS host a website other than RRS feed

  • Question

  • I know this has been asked over and over again

    can I host my personal website g-tech.org on my homeserver and how?

     

    Tuesday, September 28, 2010 12:34 PM

Answers

  • Yes, it has been asked over and over again. Since you kinow that, presumably you've searched and found the answer to your question already, but here's a précis for others who may also be wondering:

    It's unsupported but in general possible to do what you want. The specifics of how to do this are outside the subject area of this forum; you could post specific questions over in the developers forum instead, but before you do so you should learn something about basic web hosting concepts as applied to Internet Information Server. For that, you could start with Microsoft's Technet site, then proceed to IIS.net, then to books about IIS and web hosting if you like.

    I will caution you that hosting a publicly available web site on a residential broadband connection may be against your ISP's Terms of Service. If they catch you (and they will catch you) it could result in immediate termination of all service, or even very large charges for business class service for an extended period of time.

    Honestly, leaving it with your current hosting provider is your best bet.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Giss68 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 12:24 AM
    Tuesday, September 28, 2010 4:55 PM
    Moderator
  • wow ken sorry for ticking you off, so mean is illigal against ISP term of service.

    Thanks

     

    • Marked as answer by Giss68 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 12:23 AM
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010 12:23 AM
  • Saying "I know this has been asked ..." was a pretty clear sign that you didn't feel like searching, you'd rather have someone spoon-feed you the information. So I did...

    Legality: Your ISP monitors your traffic, at least in a general sense. They already know you have something running that accepts incoming connections, and if you suddenly start generating lots of traffic, they'll certainly notice. What they do about it is up to them, and I think it's pretty unlikely they'll do more than bill you for bandwidth overages (on months you go over, if you go over) but they can do anything the Terms of Service/Acceptable Use Policy you agreed to when you signed up permits: cut you off, bill you for back charges to "the beginning of time" (when you signed up), bill for damages, etc. There's lots of possibilities; read your ISP's TOS documents and make your own decision. I know personally someone who settled with their cable provider for "mid 4 figures" in this situation after getting a bill for 7 years of business class service, although I suspect he was a bit of an idiot on the phone and in (postal) mail and someone decided to "teach him a lesson".


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Giss68 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 2:26 PM
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010 1:27 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Yes, it has been asked over and over again. Since you kinow that, presumably you've searched and found the answer to your question already, but here's a précis for others who may also be wondering:

    It's unsupported but in general possible to do what you want. The specifics of how to do this are outside the subject area of this forum; you could post specific questions over in the developers forum instead, but before you do so you should learn something about basic web hosting concepts as applied to Internet Information Server. For that, you could start with Microsoft's Technet site, then proceed to IIS.net, then to books about IIS and web hosting if you like.

    I will caution you that hosting a publicly available web site on a residential broadband connection may be against your ISP's Terms of Service. If they catch you (and they will catch you) it could result in immediate termination of all service, or even very large charges for business class service for an extended period of time.

    Honestly, leaving it with your current hosting provider is your best bet.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Giss68 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 12:24 AM
    Tuesday, September 28, 2010 4:55 PM
    Moderator
  • wow ken sorry for ticking you off, so mean is illigal against ISP term of service.

    Thanks

     

    • Marked as answer by Giss68 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 12:23 AM
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010 12:23 AM
  • Saying "I know this has been asked ..." was a pretty clear sign that you didn't feel like searching, you'd rather have someone spoon-feed you the information. So I did...

    Legality: Your ISP monitors your traffic, at least in a general sense. They already know you have something running that accepts incoming connections, and if you suddenly start generating lots of traffic, they'll certainly notice. What they do about it is up to them, and I think it's pretty unlikely they'll do more than bill you for bandwidth overages (on months you go over, if you go over) but they can do anything the Terms of Service/Acceptable Use Policy you agreed to when you signed up permits: cut you off, bill you for back charges to "the beginning of time" (when you signed up), bill for damages, etc. There's lots of possibilities; read your ISP's TOS documents and make your own decision. I know personally someone who settled with their cable provider for "mid 4 figures" in this situation after getting a bill for 7 years of business class service, although I suspect he was a bit of an idiot on the phone and in (postal) mail and someone decided to "teach him a lesson".


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Giss68 Wednesday, September 29, 2010 2:26 PM
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010 1:27 PM
    Moderator
  • I will take your advice for it. by the way have you move to your new house yet. I like it and was following your blog posting in 2002-2003

    I look up to you so don't be mad at me.

    Wednesday, September 29, 2010 2:26 PM