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Windows 7 Geniune Problem after 'hard' copying my hard drive to another one. RRS feed

  • Question

  • I bought a new HDD for my laptop so I wanted to copy the whole partition to my new HDD so that I don't lose any setting to my current Windows 7.

    Mine's Professional 32-bit Version. I copied C:\ Partition using Norton Ghost 15. I encountered with issues like NO BOOTMGR stuff but I finally managed to boot up Windows.

    However, the Windows on my new HDD acted like it's a fraud version. I knew that the activation key checks through H/Ws and stuff so I decided to deactive my current HDD's Windows for a while, then proceed with my copying (by this, the new HDD will have deactived/trial version) to the new HDD. However, same thing happened and only a blue desktop welcomes me after boot up.

     

    Is there any solution that I can just copy the original HDD to the new HDD without re-installing from the start?

    These days the OSes are getting too smart. I remember when it worked just fine when I was using Windows 95 and 98.

     

    Anyways, any thoughts or comments will help me!

    Saturday, November 13, 2010 7:28 AM

Answers

  • "hccaus" wrote in message news:029b073a-0a59-4714-9f54-2619777f3241...

    I bought a new HDD for my laptop so I wanted to copy the whole partition to my new HDD so that I don't lose any setting to my current Windows 7.

    Mine's Professional 32-bit Version. I copied C:\ Partition using Norton Ghost 15. I encountered with issues like NO BOOTMGR stuff but I finally managed to boot up Windows.

    However, the Windows on my new HDD acted like it's a fraud version. I knew that the activation key checks through H/Ws and stuff so I decided to deactive my current HDD's Windows for a while, then proceed with my copying (by this, the new HDD will have deactived/trial version) to the new HDD. However, same thing happened and only a blue desktop welcomes me after boot up.

     

    Is there any solution that I can just copy the original HDD to the new HDD without re-installing from the start?

    These days the OSes are getting too smart. I remember when it worked just fine when I was using Windows 95 and 98.

     

    Anyways, any thoughts or comments will help me!


    Your laptop almost certainly had a recovery partition, and perhaps another partition on it, quite apart from the C: partition. Usually, the Recovery partition is the first partition on the HD, and the C: partition the second - you need to copy BOTH partitions to the new drive, as the boot manager will take account of the partition number, and indeed may even reside in the recovery partition (not good practice, but it happens).
    By default, when Windows7 is installed into a clean drive it creates two partitions - one for the boot management (about 800MB, IIRC), and one for the OS and data.
    In OEM installs from big manufacturers, the boot management files may be in a separate partition, inside the C: partition, or inside the Recovery partition.
    The boot management files reference partitions by order on the disk, not by drive letters - which is why your initial copy failed to boot with those errors.
     
    HTH?

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by hccaus Saturday, November 13, 2010 11:24 PM
    Saturday, November 13, 2010 10:19 AM
    Moderator
  • I ended up using Windows 7's system image backup program. It's even hidden when looking at Norton Ghost, when trying to find the hidden partition that you talked about.

    It never worked. So I decided and googled again for Windows' own backup program which eventually makes system images that I can re-image it to another HDD. This time, no problem with authentication and everything works fine now.

     

    Thanks for your comment though, it really helps me to brainstorm more into the problem.

    • Marked as answer by hccaus Saturday, November 13, 2010 11:24 PM
    Saturday, November 13, 2010 11:24 PM

All replies

  • "hccaus" wrote in message news:029b073a-0a59-4714-9f54-2619777f3241...

    I bought a new HDD for my laptop so I wanted to copy the whole partition to my new HDD so that I don't lose any setting to my current Windows 7.

    Mine's Professional 32-bit Version. I copied C:\ Partition using Norton Ghost 15. I encountered with issues like NO BOOTMGR stuff but I finally managed to boot up Windows.

    However, the Windows on my new HDD acted like it's a fraud version. I knew that the activation key checks through H/Ws and stuff so I decided to deactive my current HDD's Windows for a while, then proceed with my copying (by this, the new HDD will have deactived/trial version) to the new HDD. However, same thing happened and only a blue desktop welcomes me after boot up.

     

    Is there any solution that I can just copy the original HDD to the new HDD without re-installing from the start?

    These days the OSes are getting too smart. I remember when it worked just fine when I was using Windows 95 and 98.

     

    Anyways, any thoughts or comments will help me!


    Your laptop almost certainly had a recovery partition, and perhaps another partition on it, quite apart from the C: partition. Usually, the Recovery partition is the first partition on the HD, and the C: partition the second - you need to copy BOTH partitions to the new drive, as the boot manager will take account of the partition number, and indeed may even reside in the recovery partition (not good practice, but it happens).
    By default, when Windows7 is installed into a clean drive it creates two partitions - one for the boot management (about 800MB, IIRC), and one for the OS and data.
    In OEM installs from big manufacturers, the boot management files may be in a separate partition, inside the C: partition, or inside the Recovery partition.
    The boot management files reference partitions by order on the disk, not by drive letters - which is why your initial copy failed to boot with those errors.
     
    HTH?

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by hccaus Saturday, November 13, 2010 11:24 PM
    Saturday, November 13, 2010 10:19 AM
    Moderator
  • I ended up using Windows 7's system image backup program. It's even hidden when looking at Norton Ghost, when trying to find the hidden partition that you talked about.

    It never worked. So I decided and googled again for Windows' own backup program which eventually makes system images that I can re-image it to another HDD. This time, no problem with authentication and everything works fine now.

     

    Thanks for your comment though, it really helps me to brainstorm more into the problem.

    • Marked as answer by hccaus Saturday, November 13, 2010 11:24 PM
    Saturday, November 13, 2010 11:24 PM
  • Hello hccaus,

    Just as a friendly point of information for the next time, most hard disk drive manufacturers include a Utility CD with their drives and there is always a program on the disk that will image the old disk to the new disk, with some even allowing you to adjust partition sizes, rearrange partitiions, etc.  These utilities are almost always available for free download from the support pages of the manufacturer's web sites, too.

    Sunday, November 14, 2010 8:59 PM
  • Hello,

     

    but, mostly people don't have that kinda CD available to them. I haven't got any HDD related CD for my entire life spending over 20yrs for computers.

    Norton Ghost does do the work for making copies to one drive to another. However, problems with BOOTMGR and Windows 7 Genuine problem, I just suggest using the integrated Windows backup system. Windows creates the image with the exact partition information from the old one, and plants on your new HDD but of course, you have to go through the details for re-partitioning it if you have greater amount of HDD available on the new ones. e.g. i had 45gb/65gb for C:\, D:\, and my new HDD is a 320gb one. I only wanted to have C:\ and D:\ on it but after re-imaging it with Windows Recovery Tool, what I saw on my new HDD was exact same partition 45gb/65gb for C:\ and D:\ (respectively) and also unpartitioned 200gb unassigned. So I had to move D:\ to the new partition and then extend C:\ volume after deleting D:\ partition.

     

    It really hogs time if you are in situation like me, trying to just "hard" copy OS from one to the other. I heard there is another tool available on the web, Acro... something. People say that program works fine too, but I'm not sure whether it can deal with the Windows Genuine Application problem.

    Sunday, November 14, 2010 9:08 PM
  • "hccaus" wrote in message news:019f7968-aa39-469c-ae8f-b61586cf65e1...

    Hello,

     

    but, mostly people don't have that kinda CD available to them. I haven't got any HDD related CD for my entire life spending over 20yrs for computers.

    Norton Ghost does do the work for making copies to one drive to another. However, problems with BOOTMGR and Windows 7 Genuine problem, I just suggest using the integrated Windows backup system. Windows creates the image with the exact partition information from the old one, and plants on your new HDD but of course, you have to go through the details for re-partitioning it if you have greater amount of HDD available on the new ones. e.g. i had 45gb/65gb for C:\, D:\, and my new HDD is a 320gb one. I only wanted to have C:\ and D:\ on it but after re-imaging it with Windows Recovery Tool, what I saw on my new HDD was exact same partition 45gb/65gb for C:\ and D:\ (respectively) and also unpartitioned 200gb unassigned. So I had to move D:\ to the new partition and then extend C:\ volume after deleting D:\ partition.

     

    It really hogs time if you are in situation like me, trying to just "hard" copy OS from one to the other. I heard there is another tool available on the web, Acro... something. People say that program works fine too, but I'm not sure whether it can deal with the Windows Genuine Application problem.


    I use BootItNG for this purpose - it works fine with all sorts of capabilities... www.bootitng.com
    Direct disk-to-disk copies of partitions are a snap, as is resizing, etc.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, November 14, 2010 9:22 PM
    Moderator