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  • Question

  • My system can not find one of my data hard disk anymore, recovery programs did not help, any suggestion??

     

    regards

    Mike

    Wednesday, August 1, 2007 9:48 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Try this:

    remove the hard disk from the pc, sealed it with ziplock bag or anything, then put it in the refrigerator freezer for 24 hours or so. Then put it back in the pc, and recover your data from it.

    I been doing this many time, and always manage to pull data out from dead hard disk.

    Hope that help.

    My best.
    Wednesday, August 1, 2007 10:06 AM
  •  shutrbug wrote:
    I'm not sure what freezing the hard drive is supposed to accomplish.  I'd be careful about staying within the published specification on temperature and humidity ramps which are typically 30C/hr and 30%RH per hour.  Also, don't try to spin up the drive while it's still frozen.  The fluid dynamic bearing spindle motor may not spin up properly and if it did you could have low temperature overwrite problems on the drive causing data loss.  The specified lower operating temperature for all HDDs that I know of are either 0C or 5C.

    Does the computer recognize the drive when rebooting?  If so, can you read out the SMART parameters from the drive?  Are you sure that you don't have a cable or controller problem?


    Hi,

    I do not know if my suggestion help the topic stater or not, we have to wait and see.

    Now, I been using this method with a drive that the bios can no longer see it. and I immediately put in the pc after take it out from the freezer.

    Sometimes I put it back for another day or so, in the end, I 99% of the time, I pull the data back, and of course, the BIOS see it as well the OS.

    I know it sound madness issue (that what I thought whe nI first found about that, in the mid 90's or so) and been using it since.

    My best.
    Thursday, August 2, 2007 3:27 PM
  • The theory behind freezing a failing hard drive is that if the failure is mechanical, freezing it will cause parts to contract, lubricants to thicken, and in general everything to be become a little tighter. Then you connect the drive back up and suck it dry before it fails again.

    I've done this three times (once because the data was important, and twice to see if I could get the data faster than restoring a backup). It worked twice, and failed once. In the two cases where it worked (I recovered most of the data off the drive) the drive failed again within 1/2 hour, and re-freezing it didn't help. I've since asked an acquaintance who used to work for a data recovery firm. He told me that the theory is sound, but that if the data is critical, you should send the drive out for recovery instead of recovering it yourself, because there's a high probability of unrecoverable damage after freezing the drive.

    So as a last-ditch try at getting data off a dying drive, where the data is important but your life, job, or marriage isn't really at risk (never mind that your wife says she'll divorce you if you don't recover the family photos, will she really?) it's worth a shot. More worthwhile, of course, is to simply implement a backup plan and then test it (make sure you can read your media, recover files reliably, even recover an entire drive if needed).
    Thursday, August 2, 2007 3:42 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi,

    Try this:

    remove the hard disk from the pc, sealed it with ziplock bag or anything, then put it in the refrigerator freezer for 24 hours or so. Then put it back in the pc, and recover your data from it.

    I been doing this many time, and always manage to pull data out from dead hard disk.

    Hope that help.

    My best.
    Wednesday, August 1, 2007 10:06 AM
  • Thanks!! I will report back how's it goes.

     

    regards

    Mike

     

    Wednesday, August 1, 2007 10:24 AM
  • I'm not sure what freezing the hard drive is supposed to accomplish.  I'd be careful about staying within the published specification on temperature and humidity ramps which are typically 30C/hr and 30%RH per hour.  Also, don't try to spin up the drive while it's still frozen.  The fluid dynamic bearing spindle motor may not spin up properly and if it did you could have low temperature overwrite problems on the drive causing data loss.  The specified lower operating temperature for all HDDs that I know of are either 0C or 5C.

    Does the computer recognize the drive when rebooting?  If so, can you read out the SMART parameters from the drive?  Are you sure that you don't have a cable or controller problem?
    Thursday, August 2, 2007 2:47 PM
  •  shutrbug wrote:
    I'm not sure what freezing the hard drive is supposed to accomplish.  I'd be careful about staying within the published specification on temperature and humidity ramps which are typically 30C/hr and 30%RH per hour.  Also, don't try to spin up the drive while it's still frozen.  The fluid dynamic bearing spindle motor may not spin up properly and if it did you could have low temperature overwrite problems on the drive causing data loss.  The specified lower operating temperature for all HDDs that I know of are either 0C or 5C.

    Does the computer recognize the drive when rebooting?  If so, can you read out the SMART parameters from the drive?  Are you sure that you don't have a cable or controller problem?


    Hi,

    I do not know if my suggestion help the topic stater or not, we have to wait and see.

    Now, I been using this method with a drive that the bios can no longer see it. and I immediately put in the pc after take it out from the freezer.

    Sometimes I put it back for another day or so, in the end, I 99% of the time, I pull the data back, and of course, the BIOS see it as well the OS.

    I know it sound madness issue (that what I thought whe nI first found about that, in the mid 90's or so) and been using it since.

    My best.
    Thursday, August 2, 2007 3:27 PM
  • The theory behind freezing a failing hard drive is that if the failure is mechanical, freezing it will cause parts to contract, lubricants to thicken, and in general everything to be become a little tighter. Then you connect the drive back up and suck it dry before it fails again.

    I've done this three times (once because the data was important, and twice to see if I could get the data faster than restoring a backup). It worked twice, and failed once. In the two cases where it worked (I recovered most of the data off the drive) the drive failed again within 1/2 hour, and re-freezing it didn't help. I've since asked an acquaintance who used to work for a data recovery firm. He told me that the theory is sound, but that if the data is critical, you should send the drive out for recovery instead of recovering it yourself, because there's a high probability of unrecoverable damage after freezing the drive.

    So as a last-ditch try at getting data off a dying drive, where the data is important but your life, job, or marriage isn't really at risk (never mind that your wife says she'll divorce you if you don't recover the family photos, will she really?) it's worth a shot. More worthwhile, of course, is to simply implement a backup plan and then test it (make sure you can read your media, recover files reliably, even recover an entire drive if needed).
    Thursday, August 2, 2007 3:42 PM
    Moderator
  •  

    This is what WHS is all about, data backup.
    Saturday, August 4, 2007 4:34 AM