locked
Installing and using applications on the Server RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I do not use the home server, but it seems, It will satisfy my needs. The backup and data sharing feature seems alright, and remote connection is just easy.
    My question is;

    The computer, which home server is installed; can it be used as a normal PC at the same time? I mean, I won't use the mighty server features all the time. But when it's idle, can I install my applications on it? Like photoshop, office, visual basic? Or even the games with DX9?

    I found this http://www.win2008workstation.com/wordpress/ while surfing the net, and I am wondered if i can use it with Home Server? Windows Server 2008 is too advanced for me at this time, I want to use the Home Server and my applications (games does not matter, but it would be great if can be played).

    My PC's specs are, P4 @ 4.00 GHZ/266mHZ fsb, 2x1 GB DDR2 Ram, 200 GB SATA 2, 400 GB External Disk.
    Sunday, April 26, 2009 6:48 PM

Answers

  • Understand that WHS is built from Windows Server 2003.  I would not recommend using it as a workstation.  It's unsupported and if there are any issues or conflicts, you're on your own.

    Paraphrasing the official line: do nothing outside the WHS console.

    Sunday, April 26, 2009 7:01 PM
  • Windows Home Server will take over the entire computer when installed, reformatting all connected drives (losing any data on them). In addition, it will create a very small (by desktop standards) system partition. And finally, using Windows Home Server as a desktop operating system is unsupported and not recommended; the whole idea behind a server is that it be stable, and using a computer as a desktop system introduces too much instability. So if you have only one computer, you should not install Windows Home Server on it.

    As for that link you posted, there's no need to do what they say, and I don't even know if it would work (I didn't read all the way to the end...). Windows Home Server isn't based on Windows Server 2008, it's based on Windows Server 2003, so it's very similar to Windows XP under the hood (and that's why XP drivers often work, BTW).

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, April 27, 2009 12:28 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Understand that WHS is built from Windows Server 2003.  I would not recommend using it as a workstation.  It's unsupported and if there are any issues or conflicts, you're on your own.

    Paraphrasing the official line: do nothing outside the WHS console.

    Sunday, April 26, 2009 7:01 PM
  • It's not recommended, but we can do. I am on my own, no problem. If things get bad, I will get back to my default system configuration. The WHS Console makes everything easier, but can it be minimized or closed? Theorically, the drivers for Windows XP should work, but the interface seems like it's a "Vista style" system. Which drivers should I install? I know they resist to be installed, but can be passed with configuration of msi files. I am just wondered. I want to learn to use the home server. It seems, it is the system that i was looking for :) To organize my files and remote access is great.
    Sunday, April 26, 2009 7:15 PM
  • It's not recommended, but we can do.

    It's not just not recommended, it's unsupported.  Which means if anything goes wrong, don't contact MS for assistance because what you did is outside the scope of WHS.  Besides, accessing the server desktop directly without understanding how WHS works can and probably will give you grief sooner or later.  There are tools that are part of Windows Server 2003 (the underlying OS) that can break WHS and perhaps even cause permanent data loss.  (That's precisely why there is that big warning screen every time you logon to the server desktop.)

    I am on my own, no problem. If things get bad, I will get back to my default system configuration. The WHS Console makes everything easier, but can it be minimized or closed? Theorically, the drivers for Windows XP should work, but the interface seems like it's a "Vista style" system.

    As working1 already stated, the underlying OS is Server 2003 (which is basically XP Server).  You should always try to locate drivers for 2003.  If none are available, XP drivers might work as well.  (Vista/Server 2008 has no relation to WHS at all.)

    Which drivers should I install? I know they resist to be installed, but can be passed with configuration of msi files. I am just wondered. I want to learn to use the home server.

    If you want to learn it, the best thing to do is stick with the Console and let it do its job (in other words, don't do anything unsupported).

    It seems, it is the system that i was looking for :) To organize my files and remote access is great.

    Sunday, April 26, 2009 10:37 PM
    Moderator
  • Windows Home Server will take over the entire computer when installed, reformatting all connected drives (losing any data on them). In addition, it will create a very small (by desktop standards) system partition. And finally, using Windows Home Server as a desktop operating system is unsupported and not recommended; the whole idea behind a server is that it be stable, and using a computer as a desktop system introduces too much instability. So if you have only one computer, you should not install Windows Home Server on it.

    As for that link you posted, there's no need to do what they say, and I don't even know if it would work (I didn't read all the way to the end...). Windows Home Server isn't based on Windows Server 2008, it's based on Windows Server 2003, so it's very similar to Windows XP under the hood (and that's why XP drivers often work, BTW).

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, April 27, 2009 12:28 PM
    Moderator