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WPA (and validation tool) reported that Windows XP was valid then after 2 hours received the WPA Validation Failure Nag RRS feed

  • Question

  • This was a new PC that I build from scratch.  I also purchased a sealed version of XP-Professional (OEM version) that I have no reason to believe is not genuine.  I purchased the XP CD at a liquidation retailer.  The package was sealed and also has the COA attached so I believe that I am the first one to use this CD.

    I was online searching for Realtek HD drivers (sound didn't work with motherboard drivers) and after installing and rebooting I got a message suggesting I may be a victim of counterfeit software.  I tested online and get an error basically saying that "The Product Key used to Activate Windows on Your PC is not a Valid Microsoft Product Key".  I couldn't overcome this error (tried system restore - system only a few hours old). 

    I decided to re-install Windows XP again.  It installed fine and when I ran the Microsoft Genuine Validation Tool the Validation Status came back green saying "Genuine".  I also went online and verified with the Microsoft site that the copy was genuine.  After a few more hours, during one of my reboots I got that nag again. "You may be a victim of counterfeiting" with the WGA star in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.

    Of course, now when I run the diagnostic tool it now says that I have an invalid product key.  I don't really know why this shows up as genuine for a while then suddenly changes its mind.  Here is the output from the validation tool.  I was hoping that someone might be able to help, as I really need to use XP and that is why I purchased a genuine version (very difficult to find) for my build.

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->
    Validation Status: Invalid Product Key
    Validation Code: 8
    Cached Validation Code: N/A
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-4Q838-GYTTJ-WRRQ6
    Windows Product Key Hash: X2t2T5loizJtH3xaxhtj4fFtAiQ=
    Windows Product ID: 76487-640-2308825-23014
    Windows Product ID Type: 1
    Windows License Type: Volume
    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro
    ID: {0F48ED67-BE0B-48B2-9D67-B3FCCFD1C018}(3)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: Registered, 1.9.42.0
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Product Name: N/A
    Architecture: N/A
    Build lab: N/A
    TTS Error: N/A
    Validation Diagnostic: 025D1FF3-230-1
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Vista WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A
    Version: N/A

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: 8
    File Exists: Yes
    Version: 1.8.31.9
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: Microsoft
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: Microsoft

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109 N/A
    OGA Version: Registered, 2.0.48.0
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Office Diagnostics: B4D0AA8B-543-80070002_025D1FF3-230-1

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files\Mozilla Firefox\firefox.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{0F48ED67-BE0B-48B2-9D67-B3FCCFD1C018}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro</OS><Architecture>x32</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-WRRQ6</PKey><PID>76487-640-2308825-23014</PID><PIDType>1</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-1292428093-261903793-1801674531</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>System manufacturer</Manufacturer><Model>System Product Name</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>American Megatrends Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>1904</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="6"/><Date>20110815000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>9BA6330701842C7E</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Eastern Standard Time(GMT-05:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/><GANotification><File Name="WgaTray.exe" Version="1.8.31.9"/><File Name="WgaLogon.dll" Version="1.8.31.9"/></GANotification></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/><Applications/></Office></Software></GenuineResults>  

    Licensing Data-->
    N/A

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    N/A

    HWID Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    BIOS string matches: no
    Marker string from BIOS: N/A
    Marker string from OEMBIOS.DAT: N/A, hr = 0x80004005

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    N/A

    Wednesday, December 21, 2011 5:13 AM

Answers

  • "Snowplow" wrote in message news:05d9b51e-4913-4413-a594-c12b857e560c...

    This was a new PC that I build from scratch.  I also purchased a sealed version of XP-Professional (OEM version) that I have no reason to believe is not genuine.  I purchased the XP CD at a liquidation retailer.  The package was sealed and also has the COA attached so I believe that I am the first one to use this CD.

    I was online searching for Realtek HD drivers (sound didn't work with motherboard drivers) and after installing and rebooting I got a message suggesting I may be a victim of counterfeit software.  I tested online and get an error basically saying that "The Product Key used to Activate Windows on Your PC is not a Valid Microsoft Product Key".  I couldn't overcome this error (tried system restore - system only a few hours old).

    I decided to re-install Windows XP again.  It installed fine and when I ran the Microsoft Genuine Validation Tool the Validation Status came back green saying "Genuine".  I also went online and verified with the Microsoft site that the copy was genuine.  After a few more hours, during one of my reboots I got that nag again. "You may be a victim of counterfeiting" with the WGA star in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.

    Of course, now when I run the diagnostic tool it now says that I have an invalid product key.  I don't really know why this shows up as genuine for a while then suddenly changes its mind.  Here is the output from the validation tool.  I was hoping that someone might be able to help, as I really need to use XP and that is why I purchased a genuine version (very difficult to find) for my build.

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->
    Validation Status: Invalid Product Key
    Validation Code: 8
    Cached Validation Code: N/A
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-4Q838-GYTTJ-WRRQ6
    Windows Product Key Hash: X2t2T5loizJtH3xaxhtj4fFtAiQ=
    Windows Product ID: 76487-640-2308825-23014
    Windows Product ID Type: 1
    Windows License Type: Volume
    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro

     
     
    The Key in use here is one that was never issued by MS – and was therefore generated by a hacker’s KeyGen utility.
    It is a counterfeit.
    You will need to purchase a legal copy of Windows  - and attempt to claim a refund from your vendor.

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Wednesday, December 21, 2011 11:02 PM
    Wednesday, December 21, 2011 8:43 AM
    Moderator
  • "Snowplow" wrote in message news:bedcc5ac-80c5-4fce-9770-2ea04926009a...

    I honestly don't think so, and if it is, it is the best counterfeit that I have ever seen.

    The package was an original, sealed Microsoft OEM Windows XP, the WindowsXP CD looks identical to an old XP CD that I have from an older computer, the Certificate of Authority sticker came with the package ready to peel off and attach to the computer, and the key that I used is printed right across the CoA sticker and, once again, looks identical to a sticker that I have on an older computer.  It looks like it would be incredibly difficult to duplicate this CoA.

    The other thing that I find puzzling is why it would pass as "genuine" for several hours with both the diagnostic utility as well as with Microsoft's online validation check.

    I will get to the bottom of this, however, it is very unlikely that the key was generated by a "hacker's KeyGen utility". 

    I can guarantee that the Key showing in the report was never issued by MS – therefore it MUST have been generated somewhere else.
     
    It’s amazing how good the current crop of counterfeits are – in some cases, MS itself has to resort to reading the hidden data on the CD/DVD to know for certain, since all parts of the pack were ’lifted’ from actual manufacture’s stocks.
     
    Even if the Key itself were genuine, it’s a Volume License Key – which CANNOT be sold to the public, and therefore is non-genuine.
     
    How it’s able to activate in the first place, I’m not sure – but there may be some kind of enabling software built in to the disk to self-activate in some way, which only Validation (or updates) breaks, and then frees the system to declare itself non-genuine.
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Wednesday, December 21, 2011 11:02 PM
    Wednesday, December 21, 2011 2:57 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • "Snowplow" wrote in message news:05d9b51e-4913-4413-a594-c12b857e560c...

    This was a new PC that I build from scratch.  I also purchased a sealed version of XP-Professional (OEM version) that I have no reason to believe is not genuine.  I purchased the XP CD at a liquidation retailer.  The package was sealed and also has the COA attached so I believe that I am the first one to use this CD.

    I was online searching for Realtek HD drivers (sound didn't work with motherboard drivers) and after installing and rebooting I got a message suggesting I may be a victim of counterfeit software.  I tested online and get an error basically saying that "The Product Key used to Activate Windows on Your PC is not a Valid Microsoft Product Key".  I couldn't overcome this error (tried system restore - system only a few hours old).

    I decided to re-install Windows XP again.  It installed fine and when I ran the Microsoft Genuine Validation Tool the Validation Status came back green saying "Genuine".  I also went online and verified with the Microsoft site that the copy was genuine.  After a few more hours, during one of my reboots I got that nag again. "You may be a victim of counterfeiting" with the WGA star in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.

    Of course, now when I run the diagnostic tool it now says that I have an invalid product key.  I don't really know why this shows up as genuine for a while then suddenly changes its mind.  Here is the output from the validation tool.  I was hoping that someone might be able to help, as I really need to use XP and that is why I purchased a genuine version (very difficult to find) for my build.

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->
    Validation Status: Invalid Product Key
    Validation Code: 8
    Cached Validation Code: N/A
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-4Q838-GYTTJ-WRRQ6
    Windows Product Key Hash: X2t2T5loizJtH3xaxhtj4fFtAiQ=
    Windows Product ID: 76487-640-2308825-23014
    Windows Product ID Type: 1
    Windows License Type: Volume
    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro

     
     
    The Key in use here is one that was never issued by MS – and was therefore generated by a hacker’s KeyGen utility.
    It is a counterfeit.
    You will need to purchase a legal copy of Windows  - and attempt to claim a refund from your vendor.

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Wednesday, December 21, 2011 11:02 PM
    Wednesday, December 21, 2011 8:43 AM
    Moderator
  • I honestly don't think so, and if it is, it is the best counterfeit that I have ever seen.

    The package was an original, sealed Microsoft OEM Windows XP, the WindowsXP CD looks identical to an old XP CD that I have from an older computer, the Certificate of Authority sticker came with the package ready to peel off and attach to the computer, and the key that I used is printed right across the CoA sticker and, once again, looks identical to a sticker that I have on an older computer.  It looks like it would be incredibly difficult to duplicate this CoA.

    The other thing that I find puzzling is why it would pass as "genuine" for several hours with both the diagnostic utility as well as with Microsoft's online validation check.

    I will get to the bottom of this, however, it is very unlikely that the key was generated by a "hacker's KeyGen utility".  

     

     


    • Edited by Snowplow Wednesday, December 21, 2011 12:54 PM
    Wednesday, December 21, 2011 12:52 PM
  • "Snowplow" wrote in message news:bedcc5ac-80c5-4fce-9770-2ea04926009a...

    I honestly don't think so, and if it is, it is the best counterfeit that I have ever seen.

    The package was an original, sealed Microsoft OEM Windows XP, the WindowsXP CD looks identical to an old XP CD that I have from an older computer, the Certificate of Authority sticker came with the package ready to peel off and attach to the computer, and the key that I used is printed right across the CoA sticker and, once again, looks identical to a sticker that I have on an older computer.  It looks like it would be incredibly difficult to duplicate this CoA.

    The other thing that I find puzzling is why it would pass as "genuine" for several hours with both the diagnostic utility as well as with Microsoft's online validation check.

    I will get to the bottom of this, however, it is very unlikely that the key was generated by a "hacker's KeyGen utility". 

    I can guarantee that the Key showing in the report was never issued by MS – therefore it MUST have been generated somewhere else.
     
    It’s amazing how good the current crop of counterfeits are – in some cases, MS itself has to resort to reading the hidden data on the CD/DVD to know for certain, since all parts of the pack were ’lifted’ from actual manufacture’s stocks.
     
    Even if the Key itself were genuine, it’s a Volume License Key – which CANNOT be sold to the public, and therefore is non-genuine.
     
    How it’s able to activate in the first place, I’m not sure – but there may be some kind of enabling software built in to the disk to self-activate in some way, which only Validation (or updates) breaks, and then frees the system to declare itself non-genuine.
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Wednesday, December 21, 2011 11:02 PM
    Wednesday, December 21, 2011 2:57 PM
    Moderator
  •  "I purchased the XP CD at a liquidation retailer" is a virtually guarantee the software is counterfeit.  That is the most over-used phrase to entice unsuspecting buyers to purchase their bogus merchandise.
    Carey Frisch
    Wednesday, December 21, 2011 5:40 PM
    Moderator
  • I would like to thank you for your replies.  I am going to believe you because you are obviously more experienced than I am, and my Genuine OEM Windows XP doesn't pass the validation.

    I am going to see if I can send this package into Microsoft for analysis and confirmation that it is in fact a fake, as it is obviously no use to me.

    What I can't understand is how much time and effort must have gone into counterfeiting this operating system cd compared to how much I paid for it.  The CD itself is the gold hologram  Windows XP cd that, as you tilt it different angles you can see everything that is on a genuine CD, including the 3-dimensional hologram in the top right quadrant of the CD  bearing the windows logo that changes colors as you tilt the disc.  It has all of the other stuff on it that is on my genuine OEM windows XP cd that is installed on another computer.  The package was the blue OEM package that says "For distribution only with a new PC" complete with a product barcode and a "certificate of authenticity" label that you would attach to the computer.  As you remove the CoA there is a light green background on the package that says the coa has been removed by your PC manufacturer and should be attached to your PC.

    It just seems "so real"  that I had a hard time believing that this could have been made in someone's basement.

    If I get to the bottom of this I will report back.

    As far as "liquidation retailer" goes, I hear what you are saying Carey.  I'm not going to say who it is, but they are a fairly large operation, and buy most of Costco's out of season inventory.

    Friday, December 23, 2011 12:28 AM