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Sata Backplane RRS feed

  • Question

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    I would like to use a Sata Backplane in my build such as the SUPERMICRO CSE-M35T-1B.  I've searched newegg, the forum here and the web as well for reviews and I'm interested in hearing some opinions before making a purchase.
    Friday, November 30, 2007 3:12 PM

All replies

  • Looks good.  Does your motherboard have 5 open SATA connections?

     

    Sunday, December 2, 2007 2:29 PM
  • You can search around for a board that has 5 ports and you could even use a SATA card for additional.

    My method would be for a bridge...


    Sunday, December 2, 2007 3:44 PM
  •  

    How doesa SATA Backplane work with WHS?
    Sunday, December 2, 2007 5:31 PM
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    It is nothing special. Just a connector that allows you to easily slide your drives in and out instead of screwing them into the case and manually hooking up the wires.
    Sunday, December 2, 2007 7:21 PM
  • Does WHS server see the SATA BACKPLANE with no issue at all? I want to maximize my space with 4 hard drives instead of 3 in my server chassis.
    Friday, December 7, 2007 1:29 AM
  • It is just a connector. Think of it like a quick release cable.

    Friday, December 7, 2007 1:35 AM
  • I see. However if I am inserting 4 hard drives in a cage then why does this cage have two power connectors and only TWO SATA ports?

    link


    Friday, December 7, 2007 1:38 AM
  • I count 4 data cable connections.  The power connections can easily be split.

    Friday, December 7, 2007 1:45 AM
  • I am using two SUPERMICRO CSE-M35T-1B in my WHS box, occupying a total of of six 5 1/4" drive bays.  I have two of the slots connected to SATA ports on my Supermicro motherboard (using RAID 1 for a mirrored system drive) and the other eight slots are connected to a Supermicro AOC-SAT2-MV8 8-port SATA controller.

     

    IMHO Supermicro products are great -- I've been using them for years and have had teriffic success with them.  Highly recommended based on my experiences.

     

    As for one of your other questions: it's typical for these types of backplanes/mobile racks/call-it-what-you-wills to have n individual data connections (e.g. five SATA connections on the CSE-M35T-1B) and only one or two power connections.  The power is bussed to all drives in the unit, so there is no need to have one power connection per drive.  Usually two or so power connectors are used for redundancy and also to support higher current loads than a single connection can supply.

     

     

    tkarp

    Friday, December 7, 2007 2:09 AM
  • I do not plan on running RAID when I set up my Windows home Server. I am going to purchase the ANTEC 4U server chassis case. This case has 3x5.25" bays X 2.




    Friday, December 7, 2007 2:11 AM
  • It appears we have one happy SuperMicro customer.  Thanks for the feedback.  It appears the SuperMicro fan is easy to change out which is a nice feature..  Does anyone have experience with either of these backplanes?

    iStarUSA BPU-340-SA - I like the larger individual power buttons.

    iStarUSA BPU-350SATA - Has smaller individual power buttons for each drive.

    Friday, December 7, 2007 9:10 PM
  •  Tom Karpowitz wrote:

    I am using two SUPERMICRO CSE-M35T-1B in my WHS box, occupying a total of of six 5 1/4" drive bays.  I have two of the slots connected to SATA ports on my Supermicro motherboard (using RAID 1 for a mirrored system drive) and the other eight slots are connected to a Supermicro AOC-SAT2-MV8 8-port SATA controller.

     

    IMHO Supermicro products are great -- I've been using them for years and have had teriffic success with them.  Highly recommended based on my experiences.

     

    As for one of your other questions: it's typical for these types of backplanes/mobile racks/call-it-what-you-wills to have n individual data connections (e.g. five SATA connections on the CSE-M35T-1B) and only one or two power connections.  The power is bussed to all drives in the unit, so there is no need to have one power connection per drive.  Usually two or so power connectors are used for redundancy and also to support higher current loads than a single connection can supply.

     

     

    tkarp




    Tom, what drivers are you using for the MV8? I'm trying to install WHS on an AMD Opteron system and the install doesn't like the AMD drivers on the CD. I downloaded some drivers straight from Supermicro, and those don't work either. What was your procedure for installing the drivers?

    Thanks
    Saturday, January 26, 2008 7:37 AM
  • I've been looking real hard at this backplane as I've run out of slots and can't seem to find just the 5 in 3 bare metal cage only anywhere, which is what I really need/want.  Is it possible for this backplane to be stripped down to bare cage just to hold the drives?  It seems an expensive solution to my problem, but I need the extra slots.

     

    Saturday, January 26, 2008 10:06 AM
  • I've been using supermicro devices like this for a long time now; they are very well built.


    I've used this particular unit in quite a few builds, and again, no problems.  I used to use the startech backplane until this one came on the market.  This is much higher quality for only a bit more money.  My "BigBoy" 4U product leverages two of these for a 10-drive RAID 5 array.

     

    One thing to note is that these really are designed for 4U rackmount servers.  They will usually fit in (3) 5.25 bays, but you may need to modify your case in order for it to fit.  Typically a few surgical cuts with some tin snips to remove the drive support tabs and you're in business.  The only problem being if you ever repurpose the case later, these tabs will be gone, complicating 5.25" drive installation because the tabs won't hold the drive in place while you screw it in.  It's still doable, but an extra pair of hands would help.  This is one area a cheap (thin metal) case actually helps; you can just bend the tabs down out of the way, and later if necessary bend them back up.  If you remove the support tabs on a screwless chassis, you may never be able to repurpose it.

     

    This is typically the case of any of these 5-drive backplanes.  If modifying the case bothers you, there are many backplan and enclosure 4-in-3 solutions that are designed to go into cases without any modification necessary.  Here is one I use when a trayless design is required (note it's an enclosure, not a backplane):

     

    http://www.startech.com/Product/ItemDetail.aspx?productid=HSB430SATBK&c=US

     

    Again, the quality isn't up to snuff with the Supermicro, and it's not going to give you 5-in-3 density,  But trayless can be convenient.  And it's cheap (~ $90 street).  The only downside of it is wiring can be a bit messy compared to a true backplane.

     

    - Ryan

    Saturday, January 26, 2008 2:18 PM