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Is a SQL database installed with Windows Home Server? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am working on an addin for WHS, but it would require the use of a database. If a database is not installed with WHS, can SQL Server Express be installed in WHS?
    Friday, July 13, 2007 5:57 AM

Answers

  • I would really recommend that you add a disk that's not part of the storage pool, if you want to install anything with large storage requirements that will be kept outside of WHS. Installing things on the D: partition will have a negative impact on the ability of your server to accept large amounts of data, no matter how much free space there may be in your storage pool.
    Saturday, July 21, 2007 1:43 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi whusckabe,

    I have SQL Server Express running in my WHS without any problems. I needed it for installing MediaPortal TVE3 Server and is working fine.

    Regards
    Friday, July 13, 2007 9:22 AM
  • You can install SQL Server (Express or otherwise) on WHS. It's used by various other tools that people have installed successfully, such as WSS 3.0. However, when you install, you don't want to store a database that might grow significantly on the system partition (C: ). That partition is quite small, and you really don't want to fill it up.
    Friday, July 13, 2007 11:21 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi whusckabe,

    I have SQL Server Express running in my WHS without any problems. I needed it for installing MediaPortal TVE3 Server and is working fine.

    Regards
    Friday, July 13, 2007 9:22 AM
  • You can install SQL Server (Express or otherwise) on WHS. It's used by various other tools that people have installed successfully, such as WSS 3.0. However, when you install, you don't want to store a database that might grow significantly on the system partition (C: ). That partition is quite small, and you really don't want to fill it up.
    Friday, July 13, 2007 11:21 AM
    Moderator
  • In addition you will need to export and remove your iis certificates to get the reports functionality to install, then you will need to re-import them so that your remote desktop connections via the web work.
    Monday, July 16, 2007 2:35 AM
  • Thank you for the help. I am not to clear on the last answer, but I will check it out when I install SQL 2005 Express.
    Tuesday, July 17, 2007 12:41 PM
  • I too have installed SQL Express successfully on RC1 without issues. I did see that the C: drive only partitions to 20G, so I installed it on drive D: instead, just not in a shared folder.

     

    Saturday, July 21, 2007 8:11 AM
  • I would really recommend that you add a disk that's not part of the storage pool, if you want to install anything with large storage requirements that will be kept outside of WHS. Installing things on the D: partition will have a negative impact on the ability of your server to accept large amounts of data, no matter how much free space there may be in your storage pool.
    Saturday, July 21, 2007 1:43 PM
    Moderator
  • Ken are there any issues with multiple remote sessions with SQL express on this configuration? And just out of curiosity do you know if Quickbooks Pro database server engine will run on WHS?

    Thanks
    Friday, November 9, 2007 5:07 AM
  • SQL Express connections: Not that I'm aware of, but I have no need at home for anything more than a desktop SQL engine, and even then I'd only be playing. The configuration shouldn't have much effect, really. You're installing SQL Express on Windows Server 2003. What are the limits there?

    Quickbooks: I used to use an antique version of Quickbooks to run my portrait photography business, but it was such overkill for what I was doing that I eventually dropped back to that old standard Excel. Smile Anyway, I know that Quickbooks can be installed on Windows Server 2003 in it's database server mode, so I don't see why it couldn't be installed on WHS. Just like other database engines, try to keep the actual databases (or at least the ones taht will grow significantly with time) on a drive other than C: (and preferably not in the storage pool, which D: really is).
    Friday, November 9, 2007 12:18 PM
    Moderator
  • Ok thanks Ken.
    Friday, November 9, 2007 3:20 PM
  •  

    I would like to add an internal hard disk to my Windows Home Server drive to for storing miscellaneous, bulky, experimental files and SQL server express databases that do not need to be backed up.  The posts indidate that it is possible to add an internal hard disk to my Windows Home Server (an HP MediaSmart) and NOT have it be part of the storage pool; but no specifics are given. How do I add an internal drive and not have it become part of the storage pool?

     

    Thanks for your insight or any links on this topic, Alan

    Monday, November 24, 2008 9:11 PM
  • Since adding it to the storage pool requires positive action on your part (open the console, go to the storage tab, select the drive, and add to server storage), you just don't take that action.

    Strictly speaking it's perhaps not the best idea, because it will always appear in the console as a drive that's available to be added to the pool. Should you (or someone else with access to the console) accidentally add it to the pool, you would lose everything that was on that drive. But it's probably not very likely that someone other than you would have that access; usually only one person will have administrative access to the server. So it's a relatively small risk, I think.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Edited by Ken WarrenModerator Monday, November 24, 2008 10:39 PM fix spelling/typing errors...
    Monday, November 24, 2008 10:39 PM
    Moderator
  • I'm surprised no one has mentioned the WHS application folders, though the SDK does advise that you don't leave files open for extended periods of time which pretty much rules out using it for a database.
    http://www.mediasmartserver.net
    Tuesday, November 25, 2008 5:16 PM
    Moderator
  • Alex, note that the initial thread is from over a year ago. :) As for the application folders, SQL Server holds files open constantly. In addition, if it does low-level disk I/O for performance reasons, it may not be able to see through tombstones to it's data files. Both of those argue against, and are why I recommend a disk that's outside the storage pool if you want to manage a lot of data using tools other than the shares.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Tuesday, November 25, 2008 7:28 PM
    Moderator
  • I have installes SQL SErver Express on both my desktop and WHS. While MGMT STudio can connect to each one locally, neither can connect to the DB on the other machine. Any Ideas?
    - Bill
    Saturday, November 21, 2009 1:52 AM
  • Couple of months later,.... In response to Bill_G not being able to connect to the database on another server/system.

    - You should check the firewall.
    - Check the SQL server remote connection settings
    Wednesday, February 3, 2010 11:19 AM