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Just Purchased Used Notebook - Is My Windows 7 Ultimate Legit? RRS feed

  • Question

  • This is my first time to purchase a used laptop.  I now have it, and first thing I'm trying to do is determine if my Windows 7 Ultimate usage is legit on this laptop.

    It's a Dell Latitude D630, purchased new from Dell in March, '08 (looked up purchase details on Dell's website using the laptop's Dell Service Tag).

    It has a Microsoft Windows XP Professional COA sticker on the back side RAM cover, including still legible Product ID and Product Key numbers.

    The laptop was sold to me with no Windows Installation Disk(s) or Recovery Disk(s).

    My fundamental question is, is there a way to determine if the upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate was done in a legitimate manner.

    Here is my MGA Diagnostic Report:

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0019.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    WGA Data-->
    Validation Status: Genuine
    Validation Code: 0

    Cached Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-GJY49-VJBQ7-HYRR2
    Windows Product Key Hash: W5/6nm6F2UPXrCkY5xUhXb/+21g=
    Windows Product ID: 00426-OEM-8992662-00006
    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7601.2.00010100.1.0.001
    ID: {1CF10AE5-9C5B-48C9-B68E-BEE36C6FCFA6}(1)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    WGA Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Product Name: Windows 7 Ultimate
    Architecture: 0x00000009
    Build lab: 7601.win7sp1_gdr.120330-1504
    TTS Error:
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    WGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109 N/A
    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: 025D1FF3-364-80041010_025D1FF3-229-80041010_025D1FF3-230-1_025D1FF3-517-80040154_025D1FF3-237-80040154_025D1FF3-238-2_025D1FF3-244-80070002_025D1FF3-258-3

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files (x86)\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{1CF10AE5-9C5B-48C9-B68E-BEE36C6FCFA6}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0019.0</Version><OS>6.1.7601.2.00010100.1.0.001</OS><Architecture>x64</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-HYRR2</PKey><PID>00426-OEM-8992662-00006</PID><PIDType>2</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-3509597951-720205538-2375325125</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Model>Latitude D630                   </Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>A17</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="4"/><Date>20100104000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>55F53907018400FA</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Central Standard Time(GMT-06:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM><OEMID>_ASUS_</OEMID><OEMTableID>Notebook</OEMTableID></OEM><GANotification/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/><Applications/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Spsys.log Content: 0x80070002

    Licensing Data-->
    Software licensing service version: 6.1.7601.17514

    Name: Windows(R) 7, Ultimate edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, OEM_SLP channel
    Activation ID: 7cfd4696-69a9-4af7-af36-ff3d12b6b6c8
    Application ID: 55c92734-d682-4d71-983e-d6ec3f16059f
    Extended PID: 00426-00178-926-600006-02-1033-7600.0000-1282012
    Installation ID: 004592752961110426083695312503847436241854670641693101
    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88338
    Machine Cer44tificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88339
    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88341
    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340
    Partial Product Key: HYRR2
    License Status: Licensed
    Remaining Windows rearm count: 4
    Trusted time: 5/15/2012 10:48:14 AM

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    HrOffline: 0x00000000
    HrOnline: 0x00000000
    HealthStatus: PASS
    Event Time Stamp: 5:12:2012 13:08
    WAT Activex: Registered
    WAT Admin Service: Registered

    HWID Data-->
    HWID Hash Current: NAAAAAEABAABAAIAAAABAAAAAgABAAEAeqhmnhnIBgxGgzwMdOLGsbzXkIWCA0jqMDwqhQ==

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes
    Windows marker version: 0x20001
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: yes
    BIOS Information:
      ACPI Table Name OEMID Value OEMTableID Value
      APIC   DELL    M08   
      FACP   DELL    M08   
      HPET   DELL    M08   
      MCFG   DELL    M08   
      ASF!   DELL    M08   
      TCPA     
      SLIC   _ASUS_  Notebook
      SSDT   PmRef  CpuPm

    I appreciate the assistance.  Many thanks!

    Best regards,

    Bill

    Tuesday, May 15, 2012 6:46 PM

Answers

  • "a0128958" wrote in message news:0834f018-4c3b-445a-8529-f9fd9557ed3a...

    This is my first time to purchase a used laptop.  I now have it, and first thing I'm trying to do is determine if my Windows 7 Ultimate usage is legit on this laptop.

    It's a Dell Latitude D630, purchased new from Dell in March, '08 (looked up purchase details on Dell's website using the laptop's Dell Service Tag).

    It has a Microsoft Windows XP Professional COA sticker on the back side RAM cover, including still legible Product ID and Product Key numbers.

    The laptop was sold to me with no Windows Installation Disk(s) or Recovery Disk(s).

    My fundamental question is, is there a way to determine if the upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate was done in a legitimate manner.

    Here is my MGA Diagnostic Report:

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0019.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    WGA Data-->
    Validation Status: Genuine
    Validation Code: 0

    Cached Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-GJY49-VJBQ7-HYRR2
    Windows Product Key Hash: W5/6nm6F2UPXrCkY5xUhXb/+21g=
    Windows Product ID: 00426-OEM-8992662-00006
    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7601.2.00010100.1.0.001

    Other data-->
    SYSTEM><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Model>Latitude D630                   </Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>A17</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="4"/><Date>20100104000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS

     

    Name: Windows(R) 7, Ultimate edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, OEM_SLP channel
    Partial Product Key: HYRR2
    License Status: Licensed
    Remaining Windows rearm count: 4
    Trusted time: 5/15/2012 10:48:14 AM

     

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes
    Windows marker version: 0x20001
     
      HPET   DELL    M08   
      MCFG   DELL    M08   
      ASF!   DELL    M08   
      TCPA    
      SLIC   _ASUS_  Notebook
      SSDT   PmRef  CpuPm

    I appreciate the assistance.  Many thanks!

    Best regards,

    Bill

    No - the installation is enabled by a hackers Loader tool (an Activation Exploit, in MS terms)
     
    The Dell site should say what OS it actually shipped with - although the COA sticker is a pretty good indication, if it says Dell on it.
     
    The machine is ONLY licensed for the version with the COA sticker, unless you also have installation media and license for another version/edition of Windows.
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Tuesday, May 15, 2012 6:55 PM
    Moderator
  • Please see: Request Dell Backup Discs for information on how to acquire the correct Dell Windows 7 reinstallation discs for your Dell PC.

    Carey Frisch

    Tuesday, May 15, 2012 8:07 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • "a0128958" wrote in message news:0834f018-4c3b-445a-8529-f9fd9557ed3a...

    This is my first time to purchase a used laptop.  I now have it, and first thing I'm trying to do is determine if my Windows 7 Ultimate usage is legit on this laptop.

    It's a Dell Latitude D630, purchased new from Dell in March, '08 (looked up purchase details on Dell's website using the laptop's Dell Service Tag).

    It has a Microsoft Windows XP Professional COA sticker on the back side RAM cover, including still legible Product ID and Product Key numbers.

    The laptop was sold to me with no Windows Installation Disk(s) or Recovery Disk(s).

    My fundamental question is, is there a way to determine if the upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate was done in a legitimate manner.

    Here is my MGA Diagnostic Report:

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0019.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    WGA Data-->
    Validation Status: Genuine
    Validation Code: 0

    Cached Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-GJY49-VJBQ7-HYRR2
    Windows Product Key Hash: W5/6nm6F2UPXrCkY5xUhXb/+21g=
    Windows Product ID: 00426-OEM-8992662-00006
    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7601.2.00010100.1.0.001

    Other data-->
    SYSTEM><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Model>Latitude D630                   </Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>A17</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="4"/><Date>20100104000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS

     

    Name: Windows(R) 7, Ultimate edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, OEM_SLP channel
    Partial Product Key: HYRR2
    License Status: Licensed
    Remaining Windows rearm count: 4
    Trusted time: 5/15/2012 10:48:14 AM

     

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes
    Windows marker version: 0x20001
     
      HPET   DELL    M08   
      MCFG   DELL    M08   
      ASF!   DELL    M08   
      TCPA    
      SLIC   _ASUS_  Notebook
      SSDT   PmRef  CpuPm

    I appreciate the assistance.  Many thanks!

    Best regards,

    Bill

    No - the installation is enabled by a hackers Loader tool (an Activation Exploit, in MS terms)
     
    The Dell site should say what OS it actually shipped with - although the COA sticker is a pretty good indication, if it says Dell on it.
     
    The machine is ONLY licensed for the version with the COA sticker, unless you also have installation media and license for another version/edition of Windows.
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Tuesday, May 15, 2012 6:55 PM
    Moderator
  • Please see: Request Dell Backup Discs for information on how to acquire the correct Dell Windows 7 reinstallation discs for your Dell PC.

    Carey Frisch

    Tuesday, May 15, 2012 8:07 PM
    Moderator
  • Noel, much appreciate the assistance!

    Indeed, the Dell web site reports, for Dell Latitdue D630 laptop with Service Tag 609YTF1, an installation of Windows XP Prof SP2 with disk(s).  And the COA sticker says 'Dell' right above the Windows XP sticker (Prod ID 70045-481-512-076).  So I think it's safe to assume Dell sold the laptop to the original purchaser with Windows XP Prof.

    I apologize for the rookie question here: How can you tell from the diagnostic report (posted earlier) that it's not simply a matter of a new Windows 7 OS install where the seller simply forgot to or chose not to include the installation CD.  The used laptop I purchased was advertised as "upgraded to Windows 7 Ultimate - fully licensed."

    Many thanks!

    Best regards,

    Bill

    Tuesday, May 15, 2012 8:57 PM
  • The used laptop I purchased was advertised as "upgraded to Windows 7 Ultimate - fully licensed."

    Unfortunately, the seller was not as forthcoming as he led you to believe.  Your MGA Report shows:  SLIC   _ASUS_  Notebook and you have a Dell notebook.  You can purchase a genuine "Full Retail" edition of Windows 7 from the Microsoft Store.


    Carey Frisch

    Tuesday, May 15, 2012 9:05 PM
    Moderator
  • Carey, thank you.  If I have to go back to Windows XP because I can't acquire properly licensing for my Windows 7 usage, then I'll use the Dell contact you note to get the disks.

    Best regards,

    Bill

    Tuesday, May 15, 2012 9:07 PM
  • "a0128958" wrote in message news:3871d2cb-1762-4379-a2b7-006fb66e530b...

    Noel, much appreciate the assistance!

    Indeed, the Dell web site reports, for Dell Latitdue D630 laptop with Service Tag 609YTF1, an installation of Windows XP Prof SP2 with disk(s).  And the COA sticker says 'Dell' right above the Windows XP sticker (Prod ID 70045-481-512-076).  So I think it's safe to assume Dell sold the laptop to the original purchaser with Windows XP Prof.

    I apologize for the rookie question here: How can you tell from the diagnostic report (posted earlier) that it's not simply a matter of a new Windows 7 OS install where the seller simply forgot to or chose not to include the installation CD.  The used laptop I purchased was advertised as "upgraded to Windows 7 Ultimate - fully licensed."

    Many thanks!

    Best regards,

    Bill

     
    Nothing is 'fully licensed' without installation media and a License code (either in a COA sticker, or on a Proof of License card, in the case of Retail/Upgrade licenses)
     
    As for how I saw it, the BIOS data and Product Key were giveaways - both were for an Acer machine rather than a Dell. The OEM_SLP Key is  common to all machines from a given manufacturer. Your vendor wasn't even particularly clever, as it's possible to disguise things a lot better than this.
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Tuesday, May 15, 2012 9:27 PM
    Moderator
  • You can order recovery disks from Dell or from a third party like Recovery-Disks.com.  It is not necessary to purchase a new copy of Windows.  Recovery to the original OS will wipe out programs and data so backup your data.

    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Wednesday, May 16, 2012 12:46 AM
    Answerer
  • Noel, thank you.

    I will work with my vendor to achieve a result where my posession of the laptop is legitimate.

    Looks like one option is to obtain a retail Windows 7 Ultimate Upgrade product ($215) and have it on the shelf to make what's installed on the laptop legal.

    Looks like another option is to obtain Win XP Pro disks from Dell and reinstall XP Pro to the laptop.

    Thanks for the rookie help - had no idea on how easy it is to purchase something with pirated software.

    Best regards,

    Bill

    Wednesday, May 16, 2012 3:48 AM
  • The Dell XP recovery disks would be the cheapest route.  You can then upgrade to Windows 7 using a retail upgrade.  You do not need Ultimate unless you are multi-lingual.  Windows 7 Pro will suffice and is less expensive.  I suggest, however, that you purchase a full license and not an upgrade.  A full license is easy to transfer to another computer in the future without having to worry about anything being on the computer already.  Then you do not need the Dell XP recovery disks. 

    You cannot make what is on the computer now legitimate by purchasing anything.  The present copy of Windows 7 has to be completely replaced.  An upgrade license doesn't help because the present copy of Ultimate is non-genuine anyway.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.


    Wednesday, May 16, 2012 3:57 AM
    Answerer
  • Colin thank you.

    Looks like least expensive route is to obtain Dell XP Recovery Disks + Win 7 Pro Upgrade ($200), and then actually doing the work to replace the copy of Win 7 Ult currently on the laptop (i.e. I can't just put the Win 7 Pro Upgrade s/w 'on the shelf').

    Looks like most practical route is to obtain Win 7 Pro Full Version ($300), and then again actually doing the work to replace the copy of Win 7 Ultimate.

    Thank you!

    Best regards,

    Bill

    Wednesday, May 16, 2012 4:18 AM
  • As Colin  says - Ultimate is not necessary for 99.99% of people (let's face it probably for 50% of people they could use Home Basic, and not know the difference!).

    So long as you have a valid COA sticker on the case, then you could just purchase an Upgrade license for Pro, and use the double-install method to get that legitimately installed and activated.

    If there's no COA sticker, then you will have to purchase a Full retail license of whichever version of Windows you want.

    There's no guarantee that even if you purchase the recovery disks, that the embedded Key will work - it depends on how the hack was done n the irst place, and whether they actually toyed with the real BIOS or just put a software overlay on it to hide the real SLIC table (if any) from the OS


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Wednesday, May 16, 2012 9:49 AM
    Moderator
  • I've spent some time studying the contributions here from the experts, and have learned a lot (tons).  Much appreciate the hard work and effort by many here, making a difference.
     
    I didn't know, before purchasing my used laptop, how much risk there is obtaining an illegal OS these days.  I thought that if a received used laptop, advertsied as fully licensed, didn't show any licensing problems when first arrived, it meant that all was fine.
     
    I've also figured out that, to continue with Win 7 on the laptop, there's no way to do so other than to purchase a retail, full Win 7 product and to actually install it.  Neither no action, nor even purchasing a retail full product but just putting in on the shelf, will suffice.  At some point, due to a future h/w change, SP installation, registry update, chipset driver update, a use of a registry cleaner product, or even just a driver change, the OS will at some point probably demand a reactivation, using an appropriate OEM provided Win 7 COA Product ID and Key (which I don't have, and which probably doesn't actually exist).  And at this point, my ability to use the laptop would stop.
     
    So it's onward to replace the OS with a retail Win 7 product.
     
    Meanwhile, I've pieced together what happened.
     
    1. A corp. purchased the Dell D630 laptop (there's a 'property of' sticker on the back identifying the corp.).  Using Dell's Svc Tag #, the manifest shows purchase date was 03/08/2008 and that the laptop was licensed for a Win XP Pro.
     
    2. The laptop has an affixed COA, for Win XP Pro, Prod ID 70045-484-612-076, manufacuter (Dell), along with an appropriate Prod Key (all still readable).  Thus, at the time of shipment, Dell provided this Product ID/Key combo for the user to use to reactivate in the rare case it was ever needed.
     
    3. The COA Prod ID # indicates the corp. was licensed to install Win XP Pro using its authorized volume license Prod ID/Key combo.
     
    4. At the time of laptop receipt, the corp. installed Win XP Pro using its volume license Prod ID/Key combo.  I don't know the Prod ID # used since this ID isn't the same as the ID printed on the COA, and since the corp.'s OS installation has long since been covered over by another OS.

    5. At some point the laptop was obtained or purchased by a 3rd party.  At this point, per volume license terms, the Win XP Pro OS should have been removed (orig purchasing party no longer owns the laptop).  And with the COA Prod ID/Key combo not eligible to be used with a retail upgrade product (volume license associated), as a used laptop, going forward, the only acceptable means to put any OS on it is a full retail product.
     
    6. The 3rd party installed Win 7 Ultimate using OEM SLP Prod ID 00426-OEM-8992662-0006 and self-activating Key *-*-GJY49-VJBQ7-HYRR2.  This was done illegally, as an OEM SLP license type is legal only when installed by the manufacturer at the factory on a new computer.  OEM SLP copies cannot be transfered, purchased separately, or used to upgrade anything.
     
    7. Parenthetically, a Google search on this Prod Key shows it's an Acer enterprise OEM SLP Key.  (It's all over the Internet.)  An OEM SLP Key is common to all computers from a given manufacturer.
     
    8. Afterwards OS installation, the laptop's BIOS was hacked to make the Win 7 Ultimate self-activating OEM SLP Product key self-activate (without requiring any activation process through MS). I don't know if a BIOS overlay program was installed, or if the BIOS itself was actually manipulated.
     
    Thank you, and best regards,
     
    Bill


    • Edited by a0128958 Wednesday, May 23, 2012 5:48 PM
    Monday, May 21, 2012 4:46 AM
  • "a0128958" wrote in message news:0c17fb1a-373b-4a14-9bba-fa756d18e178...

    I've spent some time studying the contributions here from the experts, and have learned a lot (tons).  Much appreciate the hard work and effort by many here, making a difference.

    I didn't know, before purchasing my used laptop, how much risk there is with an illegal OS these days.  I thought that if a received used laptop, advertsied as fully licensed, didn't show any licensing problems when first arrived, it meant that all was fine.

    I've also learned that, assuming I want to continue with Win 7 on the laptop, there's no remedy other than to purchase a retail Win 7 product and to actually install it.  No action, or even purchasing a retail product but just putting in on the shelf, will suffice.  At some point, due to h/w change, SP installation, registry update, or even driver change, the OS will probably stop working and demand a reactivation using an appropriate Win 7 COA key (which I don't have, and which probably doesn't actually exist).  And at this point, my ability to use the laptop will stop.

    So it's onward to replace the OS with a retail Win 7 product.

    Meanwhile, I've pieced together what happened.

    1. A corp purchased the D630 assuming the 'property of' sticker on the back is applicable to the orig purchase.  Using Dell's Svc Tag #, also on the back, the manifest shows purchase date was 03/08/2008 and that the laptop was licensed for Win XP Pro.

    2. The laptop indeed has a Win XP Pro COA.  Product ID 70045-484-612-076 and key are still readable, and the company is noted as Dell.  Thus, at the time of shipment, Dell updated the BIOS to allow for this Product ID/key combo to be used for reactivation if ever needed.

    3. The Product ID # indicates that the corp. was licensed to install Win XP Pro using its volume licensing Prod ID and key.  I don't know if the volume licensing Prod ID used was the same as the Prod ID printed on the COA.

    4. At some point the laptop was obtained or purchased by a 3rd party.  I don't know if the volume licensed XP Pro was removed, per license terms, at the time of transfer.

    5. Later, the laptop's BIOS was hacked to make Win 7 Ultimate self-activating OEM SLP Product key *-*-GJY49-VJBQ7-HYRR2 work properly.  A Google search on this key shows that it is an Acer enterprise SLP key.  (It's all over the Internet.)  An OEM SLP key is common to all computers from a given manufacturer (as I've recently learned).

    6. Further later, Win 7 Ultimate s/w was installed using OEM SLP Prod ID 00426-OEM-8992662-0006 and the self-activating key noted above.  This was done illegally, as the OEM SLP license type is only legal when installed by the manufacturer at the factory.  OEM SLP copies cannot be transfered, purchased separately, or used to upgrade anything (as I've recently learned).

    Thank you, and best regards,

    Bill



     
     
    That all seems about right (although you have 5 and 6 switched around)
     
    If the original company owner did its due diligence when it disposed of the machine (assuming they had the chance), they should have re-imaged it with the original OEM installation of Windows, or at least formatted the DH, before the disposal. Unfortunately, many companies ignore this requirement (and then wonder why/how their Key  gets put up on the internet)
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Monday, May 21, 2012 8:25 AM
    Moderator
  • Noel, much appreciated the comments.

    I edited the summary a little to improve its accuracy.

    I've learned a lot.  Including the fact that at the moment plenty of computers exist with my exact same Win 7 Ultimate Prod ID and Key combo.  Astonishingly, it's all over the Internet, viewable with just a little bit of research.  I guess the knowledge needed to make it illegally work is how to go into a BIOS and mess it up.

    One question I have is, before I wipe my HD clean (format it), and then install a retail Win 7 OS product, do I need to do something to fix the BIOS from the effects of it having been hacked?  Or, will simply purchasing a retail Win 7 OS product cause the retail product to never look to the BIOS as part of any current or future authorization process?

    WRT the original purchasing corp., I think at the time of disposal, per volume license terms, the only option they have is removal of the OS (formatting the HD).  I think the original Win XP Pro OS installation was licensed not only just to the laptop (and not transferable to another laptop), it was also licensed just to the corp. to use (as I've recently learned).  Thus I don't think, before disposal, they had the option of re-imaging the HD with the original volume licensed installation of Win XP Pro.

    Now I'm going to go read the sticky here in this forum section titled something like 'Safe Buying Habits for Software Purchase' to be better prepared in the future.

    Thank you, and best regards,

    Bill

    • Edited by a0128958 Monday, May 21, 2012 6:03 PM
    Monday, May 21, 2012 5:44 PM
  • There is some bad information here.  Volume licenses are not transferrable, even with the computer.  However, you are not using a volume license.  You are using and OEM SLP license

    Windows License Type: OEM SLP

    which cannot be tranferred seperately but can be transferred if the computer is also transferred.  As the license states,

    16. TRANSFER TO A THIRD PARTY.

    You may transfer the software directly to a third party only with the licensed computer. The transfer must include the software and the Certificate of Authenticity label. You may not keep any copies of the software or any earlier version. Before any permitted transfer, the other party must agree that this agreement applies to the transfer and use of the software. An OEM SLP copy is, as the license states,

    a. One Copy per Computer. The software license is permanently assigned to the computer with which the software is distributed. That computer is the "licensed computer."  In other words, if the copy on your computer now was the copy preinstalled by the manufacturer before being sold to your company there would be nothing wrong with the company giving you the whole unit (hardware and Windows) and there be nothing wrong with your continuing to use it as they gave it to you.  It makes no difference if the company uses a volume license because that is not what is in use here.  The real problem is that somebody may have reinstalled Windows using an OEM SLP copy from a different make and model and an illegal hack to make it all work.  That has nothing to do with volume licensing.  That is just plain sloppy maintenance.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Monday, May 21, 2012 6:40 PM
    Answerer
  • ... Volume licenses are not transferrable, even with the computer.

    ... you are not using a volume license.  You are using and OEM SLP license

    Colin, thank you.

    Based on the laptop's Windows XP Pro COA Prod ID #, Windows XP Pro was installed by the purchasing corporation using their volume Win XP Pro license Prod ID (not the same as what's on the COA) and Key combo.  This was done back in March, 2008, when Dell shipped the laptop new to the corporation.

    When the laptop changed ownership, regardless of what was on the laptop at the time, since yes volume licenses are not transferrable, even with the laptop, the only legal action available to the corporation would have been to remove any OS on the laptop (as I've recently learned).

    Yes, parenthetically, at this point I'm not using a volume license.

    Sometime in the past, a copy of Windows 7 Ultimate was installed using an Acer enterprise OEM SLP Product ID and self-activating Key, along with a BIOS hack to make the self-activating Key work without any required activation from MS.  So yes, at the moment the laptop has an (illegally) installed OEM SLP Win 7 Ultimate OS on it (to be fixed shortly).

    Best regards,

    Bill


    • Edited by a0128958 Monday, May 21, 2012 7:26 PM
    Monday, May 21, 2012 7:25 PM
  • What the company did was exercise "downgrade rights."  Even though Vista was the OS offered by the manufacturer the company had the right to install XP Pro instead.  Downgrade rights mean that the company still retains the right to reinstall the copy of Vista later.  What you can do is simply order the Vista recovery disks for your model Dell and reinstall.

    Having said that, I recommend just buying a retail full license copy of Windows 7 and be done with the whole thing.  Do a clean installation and the loader program will be gone and you should have no trouble.  Of course you need to make sure Dell has provided Windows 7 drivers for your Dell.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.


    Monday, May 21, 2012 7:47 PM
    Answerer
  • "Cbarnhorst" wrote in message news:c06d3af3-a761-499f-99f3-c571bfd74f38...

    What the company did was exercise "downgrade rights."  Even though Vista was the OS offered by the manufacturer the company had the right to install XP Pro instead.  Downgrade rights mean that the company still retains the right to reinstall the copy of Vista later.  What you can do is simply order the Vista recovery disks for your model Dell and reinstall.

    Having said that, I recommend just buying a retail full license copy of Windows 7 and be done with the whole thing.  Do a clean installation and the loader program will be gone and you should have no trouble.  Of course you need to make sure Dell has provided Windows 7 drivers for your Dell.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.


     
     
    No, Colin
    The COA sticker is for XP Pro - therefore the company actually UPgraded if they did install a Volume license.:)  - there's always the possibility that they simply ran with the OEM license.
     
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Tuesday, May 22, 2012 9:02 AM
    Moderator
  • The computer dates from 2010 so it shouldn't have an XP sticker at all.  XP was no longer an option for Dell.  Very confusing.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Tuesday, May 22, 2012 2:22 PM
    Answerer
  • Corporate purchases :)

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth


    Tuesday, May 22, 2012 4:56 PM
    Moderator
  • I realize that but XP was removed from OEM availability, even to corporations, two years after Vista RTMd

    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Tuesday, May 22, 2012 5:09 PM
    Answerer
  • "Cbarnhorst" wrote in message news:d6101b3e-328d-4afa-9be3-11410a2587ca...
    I realize that but XP was removed from OEM availability, even to corporations, two years after Vista RTMd

    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

     
    So someone updated the BIOS?

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Tuesday, May 22, 2012 5:20 PM
    Moderator
  • The Dell Latitude 630 was offered with either Vista or XP Pro so a BIOS update is certainly possible.  But it wasn't offered with Windows 7 and so somebody needs to explain how it is an OEM SLP copy of 7 is on the computer.  There is no possiblilty than a BIOS update would include Windows 7 SLIC codes.  Likely the IT dept. used an unauthorized recovery dvd and hacked it. 

    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.


    Tuesday, May 22, 2012 6:18 PM
    Answerer
  • ... Even though Vista was the OS offered by the manufacturer the company had the right to install XP Pro instead.  Downgrade rights mean that the company still retains the right to reinstall the copy of Vista later.  What you can do is simply order the Vista recovery disks for your model Dell and reinstall.

    Having said that, I recommend just buying a retail full license copy of Windows 7 and be done with the whole thing.  Do a clean installation and the loader program will be gone and you should have no trouble.  Of course you need to make sure Dell has provided Windows 7 drivers for your Dell.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.


    Thanks Colin.

    Didn't know installing Vista was an option.  Obviously though, not actually interested in doing this.  But interesting to know this.

    Working now to make sure there are Dell drivers for this Latitude D630 laptop.  I would think obviously there are since it seemed to operated just fine with the illegal Win 7 Ultimate OS.

    Best regards,

    Bill

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 5:56 PM
  • ... The COA sticker is for XP Pro - therefore the company actually UPgraded if they did install a Volume license.:)  - there's always the possibility that they simply ran with the OEM license.

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    I think I've done pretty well learning a lot here.  But I don't understand the above.  The laptop was purchased in Mar., 2008 by the corp.  And, there's a COA sticker on it, clearly labeled with 'Dell', 'Win XP Pro', a Product ID, and a Product Key.

    Back in early 2008, my observation was that many corps. were resisting the move to Vista, wanting to milk as much as possible out of using XP Pro.  I think it hasn't been until Win 7 that corp. initiated orders went along with accepting Win 7.

    Best regards,

    Bill

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 6:06 PM
  • The computer dates from 2010 so it shouldn't have an XP sticker at all.  XP was no longer an option for Dell.  Very confusing.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Actually, it was shipped, new, to the corp. in Mar. 2008.  At that time point, Win XP Pro makes sense, versus Vista, at least for large corps.

    Best regards,

    Bill

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 6:07 PM
  • The Dell Latitude 630 was offered with either Vista or XP Pro so a BIOS update is certainly possible.  But it wasn't offered with Windows 7 and so somebody needs to explain how it is an OEM SLP copy of 7 is on the computer.  There is no possiblilty than a BIOS update would include Windows 7 SLIC codes.  Likely the IT dept. used an unauthorized recovery dvd and hacked it. 

    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    I think, as I put in my summary earlier, Win 7 Ultimate was put on the laptop after a 3rd party obtained it from the corp., (my guess via salvage).

    I actually don't when it occurred.  It was not necessarily in 2010, as indicated by the date in the BIOS field in the WGA Diag report (as I originally had in my summary - I've since learned this 2010 date is simply the date the BIOS was made available by the computer manufacturer).

    I don't have enough smarts to figure out exactly how a commonly available Acer enterprise OEM SLP copy of Win 7 Ult was put onto the laptop.  From Noel's earlier comments, I'm assuming a BIOS overlay program is installed somewhere on the hard disk to make Win 7 licensing routines 'see' the correct self-activating Prod Key, or, the BIOS itself was manipulated in some manner to actually have the correct self-activating Prod Key in it (and hence my question if I need to do something to restore the BIOS before I wipe the hard disk clean and install a full retail copy of Win 7?)

    Best regards,

    Bill

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 6:20 PM
  • "a0128958" wrote in message news:28360ff3-635f-44b5-90cb-e72f07ecf591...
     
    I think I've done pretty well learning a lot here.  But I don't understand the above.  The laptop was purchased in Mar., 2008 by the corp.  And, there's a COA sticker on it, clearly labeled with 'Dell', 'Win XP Pro', a Product ID, and a Product Key.

    Back in early 2008, my observation was that many corps. were resisting the move to Vista, wanting to milk as much as possible out of using XP Pro.  I think it hasn't been until Win 7 that corp. initiated orders went along with accepting Win 7.

    Best regards,

    Bill

    Technically, a Volume license of XP Pro is an Upgrade from an OEM license for XP Pro :)
    Although they are almost identical, the Volume License confers certain support rights, and other stuff - quite apart from the fact that because it requires a clean install, it guarantees a clean system with none 0f the OEM fripperies.
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 6:43 PM
    Moderator
  • I think, as I put in my summary earlier, Win 7 Ultimate was put on the laptop after a 3rd party obtained it from the corp.,

    The problem is that it was copied from another computer and not purchased.  That is what the OEM SLP copy is, a copy from a newer box.  If it was done by an authorized refurbisher it would be an OEM System Builder type instead.  Whoever did it, they tried to cut corners and avoid purchasing a valid license.  You are correct that a file simulating an Acer Windows 7 SLIC table (called a "loader") is in use.  It is probably just a file and not a change to the BIOS, although hackers do that to.  If you are installing a retail copy of Windows it won't matter about the SLIC entry because only OEM SLP copies use it.  Retail copies don't care.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.


    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 6:53 PM
    Answerer
  • ... a Volume license of XP Pro is an Upgrade from an OEM license for XP Pro :)
    Although they are almost identical, the Volume License confers certain support rights, and other stuff ...

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Noel, I didn't know this.  Thanks!

    Best regards,

    Bill

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 7:16 PM
  • I think, as I put in my summary earlier, Win 7 Ultimate was put on the laptop after a 3rd party obtained it from the corp.,

    The problem is that it was copied from another computer and not purchased.  That is what the OEM SLP copy is, a copy from a newer box.  If it was done by an authorized refurbisher it would be an OEM System Builder type instead.  Whoever did it, they tried to cut corners and avoid purchasing a valid license.  You are correct that a file simulating an Acer Windows 7 SLIC table (called a "loader") is in use.  It is probably just a file and not a change to the BIOS, although hackers do that to.  If you are installing a retail copy of Windows it won't matter about the SLIC entry because only OEM SLP copies use it.  Retail copies don't care.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.


    Colin, very helpful!

    BTW, no arguement that what's on my laptop at the moment is illegal (and will be fixed, shortly).

    I appreciate the assistance learning the mechanism of how my current OS was put on the laptop. It's a technically interesting subject.

    I had no idea how easy it is to cheat with Win 7.  Go out to the Internet and find a commonly published OEM SLP Product ID number with its corresponding self-activating Key number, install a Win 7 copy using the Prod ID and Key combo, and then install a file, called a 'loader,' to simulate a BIOS SLIC table so that the Prod Key indeed self-actuates.  No mess, no fuss - wow!

    How would I go about finding the 'loader' file on my laptop?

    Thanks for the info that I don't have to worry about the BIOS being messed with since I'll be using a full retail Win 7 product.

    Best regards,

    Bill

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 10:44 PM
  • Hi Bill,

      Unfortunately, there are a number of different variations of Loaders. Microsoft periodically updates Windows to be able to recognize the signature of known Loaders (kind of like how a Anti-virus gets updated with new Virus signatures) so the people that make the loaders change the file names, install locations, and so on, in the hope of getting around the detection.

     However, unlike an Anti-virus program, when Windows detects a Loader, the Diagnostic Report gives an error code that basically means "loader found" but doesn't say which one it is (and many Loaders don't even have an "official" name, per say) so there is no way to know which variation is installed.

    Sorry I couldn't be more helpful,


    Darin MS



    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 10:59 PM
  • ... Microsoft periodically updates Windows to be able to recognize the signature of known Loaders (kind of like how a Anti-virus gets updated with new Virus signatures)

     Darin MS

    Thanks Darin.  This has been a very interesting technical subject for me.  Had no idea, until this learning event, on how much caution is needed these days when purchasing stuff used, particularly from auction sites.

    Looks like MS would have eventually caught up to my laptop, at some point when a SP or some other Win 7 update is pushed down to all computers running MS' update service.

    Best regards,

    Bill

    Thursday, May 24, 2012 4:22 AM