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Confused about Certification - Want to Pursue Career In IT Security. RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    Currently I am Microsoft Certified Professional (Passed 70-270 & 70-290),
    I am very confused about my future, In which Domain (Exchange Server or Security) should I continue my career.
    Please tell me about various opportunities in IT Security Industry.
    Should I Complete MCSE + Security Specialization.
    Monday, June 15, 2009 11:32 PM

Answers

  • You may consider one of the following:

    Option 1:

    MCSA Security on Windows Server 2003 – 5 Exams (You already have 2 of 5)

    Detail: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcsa.aspx#tab3

     

    Option 2:

    MCTS: Microsoft Forefront Client and Server – Configuration – 1 Exam

    Detail: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/exam.aspx?ID=70-557&locale=en-us

     

    MCTS: Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2006, Configuration - 1 Exam

    Detail: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/exam.aspx?ID=70-351&locale=en-us

    Hope this is helpful.


    Rubel Khan
    • Proposed as answer by Rubel Khan Tuesday, June 16, 2009 1:29 AM
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Friday, January 8, 2010 3:43 AM
    Tuesday, June 16, 2009 1:28 AM
  • There's one thing to bring up for Kalpesh - the MCSE is based on operating systems that are some seven years old.  Having skills in either security or Exchange can be beneficial.  However, my concern is that the MCSA/MCSE is beginning to become somewhat dated.  Microsofts "new" line of certifications focuses upon their current client and server OS's.  Add into that mix that the next version of Exchange is due out sometime in 2010.

    You might want to consider an alternate path of pursuing the MCITP - Server Administrator or Enterprise Administrator, and separately pursue the CompTIA Security+ and Exchange 2010 certification once it's released.  These would give you both the skills and certifications on the latest technology, and not something that seven-plus years old.

    Note to Shems - there is a plithora of material available on the internet.  Some of it free, but you need to consider you get whyat you pay for.  As to a specific direction in IT security, look at the CompTIA Security+ exam first off.  Then, possibily the Certified Ethical Hacker and other security related certifications.  A good search engine can help you find information on these.
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Friday, January 8, 2010 3:43 AM
    Monday, August 31, 2009 10:03 AM
    Answerer
  • A very good place to start with security would be Comptia's Security+ cert, this can also be used for the general MCSA as well as the MCSA: Security credential, so no loss there (plus you'll have a security cert).

    I would say complete your MCSA first of all, to have a more general view, then specialise.  Windows 2003 will still be around for a good few years to come.  Companies aren't rushing out to upgrade to the latest OS, whether it's for the server or the Client machine in this climate.  Besides you can do the upgrades to become the MCITP: SA afterwards.

    The reason why I say do general first is that you may decide not to pursue IT Security later, there are alot of different roles out there, yes security is one of them, but then again there's Exchange and Unified Comms, there's virtualisation, etc...  But then again general IT is the biggest area and there are more roles, especially from the news recently where companies are reducing their IT staff.  I believe that having your hand in many pockets, at least for the time being, is safer :)


    -Ken | http://ken.wagnerfamily.co.uk
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Friday, January 8, 2010 3:43 AM
    Tuesday, September 1, 2009 9:33 AM

All replies

  • You may consider one of the following:

    Option 1:

    MCSA Security on Windows Server 2003 – 5 Exams (You already have 2 of 5)

    Detail: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcsa.aspx#tab3

     

    Option 2:

    MCTS: Microsoft Forefront Client and Server – Configuration – 1 Exam

    Detail: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/exam.aspx?ID=70-557&locale=en-us

     

    MCTS: Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2006, Configuration - 1 Exam

    Detail: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/exam.aspx?ID=70-351&locale=en-us

    Hope this is helpful.


    Rubel Khan
    • Proposed as answer by Rubel Khan Tuesday, June 16, 2009 1:29 AM
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Friday, January 8, 2010 3:43 AM
    Tuesday, June 16, 2009 1:28 AM
  • Is there any online material, such as demo tests and textbooks, available ?
    I seem to have an aptitude and interest for IT security but I'm not sure where to begin.
    The costs for guided learning are too steap and finding what I need in the right order (!) takes a lot of time.
    I'm hoping someone can point me in the right direction.

    Thanks :)
    Creativity cannot be taught, but it can be learned.
    Sunday, August 30, 2009 9:47 PM
  • There's one thing to bring up for Kalpesh - the MCSE is based on operating systems that are some seven years old.  Having skills in either security or Exchange can be beneficial.  However, my concern is that the MCSA/MCSE is beginning to become somewhat dated.  Microsofts "new" line of certifications focuses upon their current client and server OS's.  Add into that mix that the next version of Exchange is due out sometime in 2010.

    You might want to consider an alternate path of pursuing the MCITP - Server Administrator or Enterprise Administrator, and separately pursue the CompTIA Security+ and Exchange 2010 certification once it's released.  These would give you both the skills and certifications on the latest technology, and not something that seven-plus years old.

    Note to Shems - there is a plithora of material available on the internet.  Some of it free, but you need to consider you get whyat you pay for.  As to a specific direction in IT security, look at the CompTIA Security+ exam first off.  Then, possibily the Certified Ethical Hacker and other security related certifications.  A good search engine can help you find information on these.
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Friday, January 8, 2010 3:43 AM
    Monday, August 31, 2009 10:03 AM
    Answerer


  • I think Charles is right, Microsoft has announced the release date for New Exchange that will be bundled up with Sharepoint 2010, And my advise would be- get involved into Sharepoint- basically its a future of application and administration. A lot of people when they deploy Exchange there is a increasing need of deploying Sharepoint. But skill set is limited because Exchange administrator/Security consultant can not install sharepoint on a large server farm or I should say professionally.

    MCTS Certification
    http://microsoftcertificationmcts.blogspot.com
    Tuesday, September 1, 2009 8:50 AM
  • A very good place to start with security would be Comptia's Security+ cert, this can also be used for the general MCSA as well as the MCSA: Security credential, so no loss there (plus you'll have a security cert).

    I would say complete your MCSA first of all, to have a more general view, then specialise.  Windows 2003 will still be around for a good few years to come.  Companies aren't rushing out to upgrade to the latest OS, whether it's for the server or the Client machine in this climate.  Besides you can do the upgrades to become the MCITP: SA afterwards.

    The reason why I say do general first is that you may decide not to pursue IT Security later, there are alot of different roles out there, yes security is one of them, but then again there's Exchange and Unified Comms, there's virtualisation, etc...  But then again general IT is the biggest area and there are more roles, especially from the news recently where companies are reducing their IT staff.  I believe that having your hand in many pockets, at least for the time being, is safer :)


    -Ken | http://ken.wagnerfamily.co.uk
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Friday, January 8, 2010 3:43 AM
    Tuesday, September 1, 2009 9:33 AM
  • I believe this subject needs more attention.
    Information is provided "AS IS" without any guaranty nor liability and, in no lesser extent, with devotion and care.
    Thursday, January 28, 2010 6:41 AM