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Exams tend to freak me out RRS feed

  • Question

  • Ok I'm sure I'm not the only one that still gets a little buggered about exams, I mean I did just graduate high school last year and no I'm not going to go to school primarily because the US is just too expensive for that type of training and I'm hoping to do Certs. Any advice on which certs I should master first? I've been toying around with the idea of getting my CompTIA A+ and finding something to make me a MCP. I know with those two alone I'd be better off than I currently am. I'm accustomed to working on machines primarily because I'm a IT assistant at the company I work for and I don't mean to toot my own horn but I'm not doing too bad. We're running older stuff of course but I'm willing to learn and have a W7 at home on the laptop. Also any advice on if I should waste time learning a language or not. I'm currently working with XP s3 and 2003 servers, 55 computers and 2 servers. Thanks in advance!
    Cheers, Roger
    Wednesday, April 27, 2011 3:26 PM

Answers

  • The CompTIA programs will give you a good foundation on knowing/understanding/troubleshooting hardware.  I found the A+ to be somewhat helpful, but found that the Net+ to be extremely beneficial in understanding just how networks work.  Server+ is also a good foundational certification.

    As to your question on learning a language, I'm assuming you're referring to programming.  You seriously need to consider which direction to go (either being a hardware/client/server tech or software programmer/developer) and pick one.  Both are essential in the IT world, but have completely different paths.  For programming, having good math and logic skills is a must.  You can learn programming on you're own, but it is difficult.  College courses might be a better option.

    If you decide to pursue the hardware side, the best option (IMHO) would be the MCITP Server 2008 Enterprise Administrator.  Keep in mind that WinXP is quickly approaching the end of its lifecycle, and, truth be told, so is Server 2003.  Learning the latest technologies (i.e. Win7 and Server 2008 R2) is always the best choice.

    As to getting freaked out by the exams, if you have the right study materials, and are dilligent in your study efforts, you should do well.  There's no room for slackers.

    • Proposed as answer by MCPLEE Wednesday, April 27, 2011 7:58 PM
    • Marked as answer by Roger Tindall Wednesday, April 27, 2011 7:58 PM
    Wednesday, April 27, 2011 4:56 PM
    Answerer

All replies

  • The CompTIA programs will give you a good foundation on knowing/understanding/troubleshooting hardware.  I found the A+ to be somewhat helpful, but found that the Net+ to be extremely beneficial in understanding just how networks work.  Server+ is also a good foundational certification.

    As to your question on learning a language, I'm assuming you're referring to programming.  You seriously need to consider which direction to go (either being a hardware/client/server tech or software programmer/developer) and pick one.  Both are essential in the IT world, but have completely different paths.  For programming, having good math and logic skills is a must.  You can learn programming on you're own, but it is difficult.  College courses might be a better option.

    If you decide to pursue the hardware side, the best option (IMHO) would be the MCITP Server 2008 Enterprise Administrator.  Keep in mind that WinXP is quickly approaching the end of its lifecycle, and, truth be told, so is Server 2003.  Learning the latest technologies (i.e. Win7 and Server 2008 R2) is always the best choice.

    As to getting freaked out by the exams, if you have the right study materials, and are dilligent in your study efforts, you should do well.  There's no room for slackers.

    • Proposed as answer by MCPLEE Wednesday, April 27, 2011 7:58 PM
    • Marked as answer by Roger Tindall Wednesday, April 27, 2011 7:58 PM
    Wednesday, April 27, 2011 4:56 PM
    Answerer
  • Thanks a lot for the helpful tips. Looks like I need to hunker down and truly study... bummer :X but hey its gotta be done I suppose. Thanks a plenty!
    Cheers, Roger
    Wednesday, April 27, 2011 8:00 PM
  • I just wanted to add a little bit here...

    For learning a language, I suggest get out some books from the library of the language that you want to learn and finish all of the lab exercises in the book. Programming not only requires logic but also experience.

    Since you are not planning to get a degree/diploma in computer science/engineering or similar, you could start volunteer some of your time in offering free service in application/web development with different organizations (such as art schools, museums). Keep a portfolio and record of your work for your resume. This will increase your experience in the field and would increase your chance to be hired as a developer.

     


    MCPD - ASP.NET Developer 3.5
    Wednesday, April 27, 2011 8:05 PM
  • I just wanted to add a little bit here...

    For learning a language, I suggest get out some books from the library of the language that you want to learn and finish all of the lab exercises in the book. Programming not only requires logic but also experience.

    Since you are not planning to get a degree/diploma in computer science/engineering or similar, you could start volunteer some of your time in offering free service in application/web development with different organizations (such as art schools, museums). Keep a portfolio and record of your work for your resume. This will increase your experience in the field and would increase your chance to be hired as a developer.

     


    MCPD - ASP.NET Developer 3.5

    Now that is what I love to hear, it means I don't necessarily have to sit through all the boring parts. I'd be more interested in setting up a "CompSci" club at the local High School and try to teach them a little about computing nothing in too much detail unless they were of that capability any suggestions over that? Like I know I'm not certified but it would actually add to practice and what I did learn through studying I could just apply during the meetings and make sure that its really commited to memory. Of course I would need approvals and quite possibly a helping hand from someone who is certified but any thoughts about it possibly helping me and my certs I don't think I'd be good at programming. I'm great with math and logic however I think I would be bored with all the coding :(
    Cheers, Roger
    Wednesday, April 27, 2011 8:09 PM