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Re: VLK no longer in use by Issuer RRS feed

  • Question

  • Dan at IT Associates,

    Apparently I did not communicate this clearly the first time.  I have run the PK Updater tool again with all firewalls & other devices turned off.  When I enter the PK from my CoA and press next, the Updater tool responds with "The product key entered is not a valid key for this system.  Please check it for typing errors and try again."  I did check and there are no typing errors and tried again with the same result. 

    Let's rehash.  I have a WGA version of XP Pro for a year.  One day I turn on computer and suddenly it's not WGA.  The WGA Tool identifies the VLK for my PK has been discontinued, but the PK on my CoA is different than that identified by the system and the PK Updater tool gives the above quoted message.

    Is there a way for me to validate the PK on my CoA is valid since the Updater tool won't do this?  What do I do now?
    Saturday, December 29, 2007 5:42 AM

Answers

  • Another WGA Victim,

     

    You can "feel" for the presence of a label about 1/8" of an inch from the outer edge with a fingernail or other delicate object like a small pocketknife of even a straight pin.  The real live XP CDROM (and the super-counterfeits!) has the hologram embedded within the plastic (a patented method of disc manufacturing developed exclusively for MS as an antipiracy measure) of the CD while the very good counterfeits have the hologram affixed to the top surface of the CD as a label.  Go to this page http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/content.aspx?displaylang=en&pg=counterfeit and follow the Counterfeit Gallery links, then choose to see hi quality counterfeits of XP.

     

    A CD with both the "270" number and "for distribution with a new PC" has all the characteristics of a counterfeit, BUT!!!!!  only the Microsoft cryptographic lab can make the final determination.  A CD with "for distribution with a new PC" should have OEM as the last three characters in the PID= value in the setupp.ini file.

     

    I can't figure out however how a CD with a 270 number did an installation with a 640 number as yours has.  Was there an intervening installation?

     

    My suggestion would be to run the WGA program and follow the prompt that leads you to sending in a report for suspected counterfeit materials.  You'll be told how and where to send the actual materials you have along with info on where, from whom, and how you purchased the materials.  I understand it takes at least 30 days for you to get a response after they get the materials.  If you really do have counterfeits, you'll get a free copy of XP from Microsoft.

    Monday, December 31, 2007 12:26 AM
  • Hello,

     

     

    First we go back and determine why it failed.  If it is not counterfeit we should send the software back.  :-)

     

     

    Thank you,

     

    Stephen Holm, MS

    Friday, January 11, 2008 6:07 PM

All replies

  • Another WGA Victim,

     

     Can you verify that the CoA affixed to the computer is for XP Professional 1-2 CPU?  The reason for my asking is that the error message "The product key entered is not a valid key for this system.  Please check it for typing errors and try again." is displayed when the typed Product Key is either mistyped or when you enter a Product Key not meant for that "flavor" of XP, say, using an XP Home key when trying to install XP Pro.

     

    Also, put your XP Pro CDROM into the computer, navigate to the i386 folder on the CD, find the setupp.ini file, which is a small text file with two sections, each with only a couple of lines of text.  Please post the second section.

    Saturday, December 29, 2007 2:45 PM
  • The CoA label affixed to the PC identifies this as Windows XP Professional.  Here is the second line of data from the setupp.ini file: Pid=55274270

    This confuses me because when I loaded Windows it requires you to enter the PK from the COA, which I did.  Then I authorized it on the MS site and everything was fine.  Why does it now think the PK from the CoA doesn't match the system PK?
    Sunday, December 30, 2007 2:54 AM
  • Another,

     

    You have a very curious situation.

     

    The last three characters of the PID line you posted are indicative of what type of "bits" are on the CD.  Character sets "270" and "64x" (with x being any numberal between 0-9) indicate that the bits on Volume Licensing bits.  What that means is the CD is either a Genuine XP Pro Volume Licensing CD, or, it is a counterfeit CD.

     

    If the CD has the wording "NOT FOR RETAIL OR OEM DISTRIBUTION" imprinted in the hologram, or it has green silk screening as shown on this page http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/windows/quiz.aspx?method=quiz_vol&displaylang=en&acq=4 , then it is a Volume Licensing CD that you should not have been given when purchasing OEM software.

     

    If the CD has "FOR DISTRIBUTION ONLY WITH A NEW PC" imprinted in the hologram, then it might very well be a counterfeit CD, because those CD are supposed to have "OEM" as the last three characters in the PID value in the setupp.ini file.  Look CLOSELY at the CD with a magnifying glass to see if the hologram and inner band are actually embedded within the plastic of the CD or if they are applied to the exterior surfaces of the CD.

     

    Your CoA's PK is not the same as the PK being reported in the mgadiag report, correct?

     

    Sunday, December 30, 2007 4:03 AM
  • My CD hologram does state "For distribution with a new PC only."  I don't own a magnifying glass, so it's difficult to tell if the hologram and inner band are imbedded in the plastic or not.

    Correct.  My PK on the CoA does not match the PK identified by the mgadiag report.

    What next?
    Sunday, December 30, 2007 5:53 PM
  • Another WGA Victim,

     

    You can "feel" for the presence of a label about 1/8" of an inch from the outer edge with a fingernail or other delicate object like a small pocketknife of even a straight pin.  The real live XP CDROM (and the super-counterfeits!) has the hologram embedded within the plastic (a patented method of disc manufacturing developed exclusively for MS as an antipiracy measure) of the CD while the very good counterfeits have the hologram affixed to the top surface of the CD as a label.  Go to this page http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/content.aspx?displaylang=en&pg=counterfeit and follow the Counterfeit Gallery links, then choose to see hi quality counterfeits of XP.

     

    A CD with both the "270" number and "for distribution with a new PC" has all the characteristics of a counterfeit, BUT!!!!!  only the Microsoft cryptographic lab can make the final determination.  A CD with "for distribution with a new PC" should have OEM as the last three characters in the PID= value in the setupp.ini file.

     

    I can't figure out however how a CD with a 270 number did an installation with a 640 number as yours has.  Was there an intervening installation?

     

    My suggestion would be to run the WGA program and follow the prompt that leads you to sending in a report for suspected counterfeit materials.  You'll be told how and where to send the actual materials you have along with info on where, from whom, and how you purchased the materials.  I understand it takes at least 30 days for you to get a response after they get the materials.  If you really do have counterfeits, you'll get a free copy of XP from Microsoft.

    Monday, December 31, 2007 12:26 AM
  • What happens if I submit all of this and the Lab determines it's NOT counterfeit?
    Wednesday, January 2, 2008 3:34 AM
  • Bumping thread....

     

    Hoping Stephen Holm of Microsoft can help us with this answer, as it is a very good question...

     

    Friday, January 11, 2008 1:37 AM
  • Hello,

     

     

    First we go back and determine why it failed.  If it is not counterfeit we should send the software back.  :-)

     

     

    Thank you,

     

    Stephen Holm, MS

    Friday, January 11, 2008 6:07 PM
  • Dan,

     

    Very good question :-). I followed up and posted back to the customer in the thread :-)

     

     

    stephen MS

    Friday, January 11, 2008 6:08 PM