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The Perfect Monitor For Headless WHS? RRS feed

  • Question

  •  

    I just read about the 

    Samsung USB connected 940UX LCD monitor on "engadget"

    http://www.engadget.com/2007/10/04/samsung-ships-usb-connected-940ux-lcd-monitor       

      This is what engadget had to say about it

    "It's been a long time coming, but Samsung has finally loosed its 19-inch USB connected 940UX on the US public. Starting today, interested consumers can snatch the monitor up, which "leverages Samsung's proprietary UbiSync technology to allow multiple screens to connect via USB, rather than VGA, without the need for a graphics card or any special video hardware." Yes, that means that each screen boasts an onboard video card and embedded driver software, and yes, you can connect up to six screens to one PC -- provided you have that many open ports, of course. The pain? $379 a pop."

    Seems as monitor we can use if we had one of those WHS Boxes from HP or TranquilPC with oth a Monitor port.

    Thursday, October 4, 2007 5:09 PM

All replies

  • Looks cool, but A) does it have driver support for Windows 2003? And B) Why would you want it for your WHS machine, since the only time anyone will ever need to connect a monitor is when an enthusiast is installing (or reinstalling) on their own hardware? The HP and other OEM units omit the video port for a reason: it's not needed for Windows Home Server to serve all of it's functions in the home environment.

    I could see it as an additional monitor for use with a notebook or desktop PC, though.
    Thursday, October 4, 2007 6:49 PM
    Moderator
  • The HP and other OEM units omit the video port for a reason: it's not needed for Windows Home Server to serve all of its functions in the home environment.

     

    Which brings me to several related WHS questions I've long had that I'll ask here: is the assumption that these OEM boxes with hopelessly no video will never, ever, need O/S reinstallation or O/S upgrade or primary disk drive replacement? If they need any of those things, then what? Are there no BIOS settings that might need to be tweaked? (And how do you do that in a headless environment on a box that wasn't completely purpose built and DOES have them?)

     

    The headless model seems great for things like the NSLU2, but it seems more problematic for PC heritage systems that have things like BIOS settings. Console ports still exist in a lot of computer equipment for a reason.

    Thursday, October 4, 2007 9:55 PM
  •  Dick Watson wrote:

    The HP and other OEM units omit the video port for a reason: it's not needed for Windows Home Server to serve all of its functions in the home environment.

     

    Which brings me to several related WHS questions I've long had that I'll ask here: is the assumption that these OEM boxes with hopelessly no video will never, ever, need O/S reinstallation or O/S upgrade or primary disk drive replacement? If they need any of those things, then what? Are there no BIOS settings that might need to be tweaked? (And how do you do that in a headless environment on a box that wasn't completely purpose built and DOES have them?)

     

    The headless model seems great for things like the NSLU2, but it seems more problematic for PC heritage systems that have things like BIOS settings. Console ports still exist in a lot of computer equipment for a reason.

     

    Dick

     

    The very reason guys like you like to "look under the hood"  show the need for a Monitor like this and  for your concerns about recovery and the like ,we have to wait for the WHS OEM Hardware to see exactly how each manufacturer solves this issue.

     

    However WHS has a requirement for each manufacturer to provide a "recovery button" on the device. ( Ken I believe discussed this in one of his post) anyway take a look at how Tranquil PC approached the recovery of their WHS PC

     

    http://green-pcs.co.uk/2007/09/01/the-keys-to-success/

     

    You will see that recovery is possible without Monitor ,Mouse or keyboard and the goal is for al othe  interaction with the WHS be via the Console or RDP.

    Thursday, October 4, 2007 10:39 PM
  • There is a BIOS (maybe eventually there will be a move to EFI; I don't really know). I presume HP et al will configure it properly, just as you or I would with a home-built PC. There will be no tweakage with the HP MediaSmart Server. Smile

    As for system recovery, drive replacement, or OS upgrade: the OEM units are required to have a recovery button. If the server is booted while that button is pressed, it changes the boot order. That will allow the server to either boot from an external DVD-ROM or USB flash drive, or internal flash (as determined by the manufacturer). From that point, I think it's up to the OEM exactly how it works. It could run an unattended installation (server reinstallation flavor) from DVD or flash, or it could listen for instructions from another machine on your home network, thus running the reinstallation over your network. I can think of other options as well.
    Thursday, October 4, 2007 10:43 PM
    Moderator
  •  

    Thanks for the insight. Now I know. I'd hope someday that some scheme like these for booting/installing/configuring headless systems would become standardized to the point that any mobo/system of resonable complicance with "standards" can be used equally in headless system like WHS and in "regular" PCs.
    Friday, October 5, 2007 1:26 AM
  • I have to point out that the Tranquil PC solution only works for the situation where your OS is hosed up, but the hardware is fine. If your system drive fails, as far as I can tell (I don't have one of their WHS units sitting in front of me to try it) you still have to be able to do a server reinstallation to recover.

    Enthusiasts definitely need a monitor any time they're installing WHS. That's really the only time, though, and I have a very nice (=cheap, in this case) LCD that I use for that purpose. It's normally connected to my desktop as a second monitor for email, documents, spreadsheets, etc. when I need the extra real estate.
    Friday, October 5, 2007 2:29 AM
    Moderator
  • The monitor is nice but the $379 pricepoint is steep. You can buy a off the shelf 19" LCD for about $130-150 and use this USB to VGA adapter to connect via USB. The whole package would be about $230.00. For that matter you could use a much smaller 7" or 8" unit and permanently attach to your box for a built in look.

    Regards,

    Bryan
    Friday, October 5, 2007 6:13 PM
  •  BBlake wrote:
    The monitor is nice but the $379 pricepoint is steep. You can buy a off the shelf 19" LCD for about $130-150 and use this USB to VGA adapter to connect via USB. The whole package would be about $230.00. For that matter you could use a much smaller 7" or 8" unit and permanently attach to your box for a built in look.

    Regards,

    Bryan

     

    Bryan

     

    whre can I get one of those 8" Monitors and the USB to VGA  adapter.

    Friday, October 5, 2007 7:30 PM