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Justification alignment differ in Word 2010 and 2013 RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi Everyone,

    Is it Microsoft Word 2010 and 2013 have two different kind of justification behavior? Because when i create document in Word 2013 and open with 2010 it's contents are aligned improperly when i justification alignment apply for paragraph.

    Can any one provide suggestion for these

    Regards,

    Vijay R


    Vijay


    Thursday, March 31, 2016 10:42 AM

Answers

  • Hi Guys,

     

    I have manually tried to find out the calculations behind present in the Word 2013 Justification alignment and found some behaviors.

     

    Microsoft Word 2013 adjust some extra word by compressing the inter word spacing, this is well known behavior but question is when the MS Word fit extra word?

     

    While I testing some documents manually, MS Word do the below operations.

     

    When line have space for fitting next word

    Check Word width/2 > remaining width

    If this condition is satisfied then Microsoft Word reduce its Whitespaces width by 4.

    Then try to fit the splitted word in current line if it fits means, fit the word otherwise moved to next line.

     

    This behavior is matched more number of documents but I am not sure whether this is correct or not. Can anyone help to find the best solution regarding this?

     

    Regards,

    Vijay
    Friday, August 5, 2016 8:54 AM
  • Word 2010 and earlier have two kinds of justification - a Microsoft default and a WordPerfect emulation. Word 2013 has only one kind of justification - a Microsoft default that is different from the Microsoft default in Word 2010 and earlier. IIRC, Word 2013 will respect the justification that exists in a document created in Word 2010 and earlier. The reverse, however, does not apply - because Word 2010 & earlier were developed before the Word 2013 justification behaviour came into existence and, hence, lack the code to implement it.

    Cheers
    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

    Friday, April 1, 2016 3:57 AM
  • If you need the same justification, use a Word 2010 template. I'm not sure, but you may be able to create one in Word 2013 via File|Options|Advanced>Layout this Document as if created in>Microsoft Word 2010 - (or earlier); otherwise you'll need to create a suitable template in Word 2010 and use that. That will coerce Word 2013 into using the Word 2010 & earlier rules. As I said, Word 2010 cannot do Word 2013 justification - the rules differ and Word 2010 lacks the code. I believe Word 2010's 'WordPerfect' justification is closer to the Word 2013 default than the Word 2010 default. With a Word 2010 template, you can access the 'WordPerfect' justification rules via File|Options|Advanced>Layout Options>Do full justification the way WordPerfect 6.x for Windows does.

    Cheers
    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

    Friday, April 1, 2016 1:01 PM

All replies

  • My guess is that the two normal.dot templates are different. Any Word MVP here?

    Best regards, George

    Thursday, March 31, 2016 12:51 PM
  • Hi, Vijay_RM

    As per your description I tried to create a new document in word 2013 and then I add paragraph then make it justify.

    After that I open that document with word 2010 but my paragraph is showed as justified in word 2010 also. There is no change in formatting. Here I did not reproduce your issue.

    >> here I want to confirm with you that if you open a word document in 2010 then how your paragraph displayed. In Home Tab, in the Paragraph group, is it displayed as “Align Left” or “Justify”?

    >> Can you provide some details steps that can reproduce your issue because currently it is working fine on my side.

    Please visit the link below to get idea about which things are change when you open a word 2013 document in word 2010.

    Open a Word 2016 or 2013 document in an earlier version of Word

    Regards

    Deepak


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    Friday, April 1, 2016 2:32 AM
  • Word 2010 and earlier have two kinds of justification - a Microsoft default and a WordPerfect emulation. Word 2013 has only one kind of justification - a Microsoft default that is different from the Microsoft default in Word 2010 and earlier. IIRC, Word 2013 will respect the justification that exists in a document created in Word 2010 and earlier. The reverse, however, does not apply - because Word 2010 & earlier were developed before the Word 2013 justification behaviour came into existence and, hence, lack the code to implement it.

    Cheers
    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

    Friday, April 1, 2016 3:57 AM
  • Hi Deepak,

    Thanks for your reply.

    If you created a simple document and it may works fine in both 2010 and 2013.

    Do the following things.

    Insert the text with left alignment until text split to next line after that you apply the justify alignment for that paragraph.

    After applying justify alignment if your splitted word moves to first line then this document must raise different behavior in Word 2010. Try this you may reproduce the issue.

     Note: All words not moved to first line if we apply justify.

    Regards,

    Vijay R


    Vijay


    Friday, April 1, 2016 12:40 PM
  • Hi Paul,

    Thanks for your reply.

    I am facing, exactly what you said. But i need to know how Microsoft word 2013 fits the extra word comparatively Word 2010.

    I think inter word spacing was reduced in Word 2013. Can you please provide your suggestions?

    Regards,

    Vijay R


    Vijay

    Friday, April 1, 2016 12:43 PM
  • If you need the same justification, use a Word 2010 template. I'm not sure, but you may be able to create one in Word 2013 via File|Options|Advanced>Layout this Document as if created in>Microsoft Word 2010 - (or earlier); otherwise you'll need to create a suitable template in Word 2010 and use that. That will coerce Word 2013 into using the Word 2010 & earlier rules. As I said, Word 2010 cannot do Word 2013 justification - the rules differ and Word 2010 lacks the code. I believe Word 2010's 'WordPerfect' justification is closer to the Word 2013 default than the Word 2010 default. With a Word 2010 template, you can access the 'WordPerfect' justification rules via File|Options|Advanced>Layout Options>Do full justification the way WordPerfect 6.x for Windows does.

    Cheers
    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

    Friday, April 1, 2016 1:01 PM
  • Hi Paul,

    Thanks for your reply. 

    If i need all layout options as like Word 2013 and only justification alignment will behave just like Word 2010. Is there any possibilities for these?

    Because if i choose compatibility options it not perfect for all behavior.

    Thanks,

    Vijay R


    Vijay

    Friday, April 1, 2016 1:16 PM
  • No, that's not possible. Word 2010 and 2013 use different layout engines. That's why, for example, Word 2013 does not offer the same layout options as Word 2010.

    Cheers
    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

    Friday, April 1, 2016 1:26 PM
  • Hi Guys,

     

    I have manually tried to find out the calculations behind present in the Word 2013 Justification alignment and found some behaviors.

     

    Microsoft Word 2013 adjust some extra word by compressing the inter word spacing, this is well known behavior but question is when the MS Word fit extra word?

     

    While I testing some documents manually, MS Word do the below operations.

     

    When line have space for fitting next word

    Check Word width/2 > remaining width

    If this condition is satisfied then Microsoft Word reduce its Whitespaces width by 4.

    Then try to fit the splitted word in current line if it fits means, fit the word otherwise moved to next line.

     

    This behavior is matched more number of documents but I am not sure whether this is correct or not. Can anyone help to find the best solution regarding this?

     

    Regards,

    Vijay
    Friday, August 5, 2016 8:54 AM