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SSD 64-bit client restore questions RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have WHS and a Windows 7 64-bit client PC with 128Gb SSD.  I need to replace the SSD with a 256GB 6GB/s connection without sacrificing an alignment speed loss.

     If I do a new install of Windows 7 to the new SSD and then, having loaded the Connector, restore the full backup from WHS am I likely to encounter any problems (licensing or driver wise)?  I then plan to wipe the old SSD, upgrade it's firmware and install a new Windows 7 O/S on it.

     MS FAQ's don't directly address this scenario which needs to be followed (I believe) if I am not to sacrifice the higher speed available with my 6GB Mobo SATA connector.

     

    Many thanks

    Friday, November 19, 2010 8:14 PM

Answers

  • I'm not going to touch the licensing questions. Please contact your software vendors for support.

    For restoring, you can't restore to a running OS. To restore the system partition, you need to do it from an environment other than the OS on the partition. The Restore CD is the supported way to do so, but it's a 32 bit environment, which makes restoring a 64 bit computer a little painful. If you have the connector installed somewhere else, the unsupported way to restore is to connect your disk to that other computer, then on that computer, run C:\Program Files\Windows Home Server\ClientRestoreWizard.exe. It's the same program the restore CD uses, just hosted in a full Windows environment.

    As for alignment, again, I'm not going to touch it. If you need to do something special to properly align sectors on your disk, you presumably already have all the information you need. I have none of the information and none of the hardware, and in the end it's not a Windows Home Server issue, it's a hardware issue that you have that just happens to possibly impact a Windows Home Server restore.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Saturday, November 20, 2010 8:39 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • You can find the basic information you need in the Console help files; you want to restore a home computer. Please read up on that process.

    What you won't find there is that the Home Computer Restore CD is 32 bit, not 64 bit, so you will have to obtain 32 bit drivers for your network interface and possibly for your hard disk controller as well. The best source for those drivers will be your motherboard (or computer if you have an OEM computer) manufacturer. You may need to activate after restoring, or you may not. It's hard to say.

    As for alignment, we can't help you with that.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Saturday, November 20, 2010 3:23 AM
    Moderator
  • Ken, thank you for responding so quickly.  If I begin by setting up the new SSD with a new Windows 64-bit installation and then add the WHS connector the use of 32-bit drivers becomes irrelevant doesn't it?  My goal is to sort the SSD alignment issues by using the Windows 7 installation process to address alignment.  I guess what I'm asking is:

    1. If I approach the problem as I suggest will the restore process overwrite the new OS and negate the alignment operations undertaken by the new install or can I selectively ask it to ignore it but restore the registry settings for software installations.

    2. Is licensed software going to accept  the replacement disk with just minimal license refresh (probably a more difficult question to answer since I use AutoCAD Architecture, CS5 and quite a lot of expensive business software).

    From reading on the web it seems that none of the clone software (Acronis, Paragon, Norton) fully address alignment.  I used Paragon 6-months ago with my 6Gb/s SATA mobo and ended up with a slower W7 performance score than the old 3Gb/s install.  Consequently I went back to the old 128Gb SSD and now have to uninstall software to allow room for updates.

     

    Saturday, November 20, 2010 4:05 PM
  • I'm not going to touch the licensing questions. Please contact your software vendors for support.

    For restoring, you can't restore to a running OS. To restore the system partition, you need to do it from an environment other than the OS on the partition. The Restore CD is the supported way to do so, but it's a 32 bit environment, which makes restoring a 64 bit computer a little painful. If you have the connector installed somewhere else, the unsupported way to restore is to connect your disk to that other computer, then on that computer, run C:\Program Files\Windows Home Server\ClientRestoreWizard.exe. It's the same program the restore CD uses, just hosted in a full Windows environment.

    As for alignment, again, I'm not going to touch it. If you need to do something special to properly align sectors on your disk, you presumably already have all the information you need. I have none of the information and none of the hardware, and in the end it's not a Windows Home Server issue, it's a hardware issue that you have that just happens to possibly impact a Windows Home Server restore.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Saturday, November 20, 2010 8:39 PM
    Moderator