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What are the benefits of WHS over Server 2003? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Maybe I just don't get it, but from what I have seen the details of the value added by WHS seem to be primarily as a backup server.  I don't understand how it could be a robust media server without apparent support for RAID.  My primary file server is running Server 2003 64bit and serves up 2 TB of video and audio files over a RAID 5 filesystem with a hot spare.  As I underand it, I would have to break up the array to introduce it to WHS.  Is this correct?

    Sunday, July 1, 2007 11:52 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    You do not need to add the RAID to the WHS pool. (add drive option in whs console), as soon to add it, your array is gone, whs will format any add drive to it.

    I am planning this with new hardware and new install of RC:

    Giving WHS it own hard disk drivers (6 ports) within the RAID controller pass-throw (not adding to the array), and the rest ports (10 ports) will be normal share with RAID 6.

    So, pc's backup protected by WHS together with some share for pictures and music files.

    But many install whs on the raid array as well without problem, I am just want to be in the safe side.

    My best.




    Monday, July 2, 2007 1:20 AM
  • Stu, you don't have to break your array to add it to WHS, though you might want to do so anyway. If you don't break it it will appear like any other drive once you add the drivers for it. However, if you add the drivers during installation, WHS will format the array. You receive ample warning, both in the documentation and (repeatedly) on screen.

    If you add the drivers after the installation completes, then WHS will just see it like any other drive that's just been connected. Any data will be available, though you won't be able to share it easily through WHS.
    Monday, July 2, 2007 2:50 AM
    Moderator
  •  Ken Warren wrote:
    Stu, you don't have to break your array to add it to WHS, though you might want to do so anyway. If you don't break it it will appear like any other drive once you add the drivers for it. However, if you add the drivers during installation, WHS will format the array. You receive ample warning, both in the documentation and (repeatedly) on screen.

    If you add the drivers after the installation completes, then WHS will just see it like any other drive that's just been connected. Any data will be available, though you won't be able to share it easily through WHS.

     

    Hi Ken.

     

    Do you think there might be any future implimentation of easily adding additional drives like this for sharing over the network through WHS without having to actually include them in the WHS drive pool? That way data we want to put on the server that doesn't need duplication won't be taking up pool space.

     

    I'd rather keep my mp3,s and videos on a separate raid setup, and have all critical data in the pool space along with duplication as an option on backups. When you start getting terrabytes of music and videos I think raid 5 is a more efficient use of space then duplicating everything for redundancy.

     

    Thanks

     

    gib

    Monday, July 2, 2007 11:38 AM
  • You can share the data on a non-pool drive now. You just create a share, add users and groups as required, and hey presto! your data is shared. Smile Just realize that WHS won't manage the shares for you, you won't be able to turn on duplication, and if you forget that this drive contains important data, you could add it to the storage pool and lose everything on it. (You're quite right, I think it's a bad idea to have a non-pool disk attached to WHS for very long...)

    As for what to duplicate vs what not to, I prioritize things. Some types of data are going to get duplication turned on, because they are difficult or impossible to recover otherwise. Family photos, downloaded software purchases (if I don't know if I'll be able to download the software again if I need to), important documents like tax, financial, and medical records all fall into this category. For media, as long as I still have the CD/DVD/vinyl I don't see the point in duplicating the rips. I can always recreate them (yes, it could take a while, especially for the vinyl). And I still have all my media.
    Tuesday, July 3, 2007 2:08 AM
    Moderator