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Does WGA causes harm to your computer and causes it to crash RRS feed

  • Question

  • Evening to all,

    My question to all members is does installing WGA offered through update is safe for your system or not at the cost of accepting the windows updates.

    I have reasons to believe in this.
    WGA was installed on my system and it passed validation etc. etc. showed the system as genuine.

    then one day i installed a internal PCI modem into my computer ,since there was misalignment between motherboard and system cabinet the card was mechanically stressed and become loose or so when i started the system first thing it asked me to reactivate the windows which was not sucessful as i could not do it over broadband modem , No question of using recently installed DialUp modem.

    i tried to use phone option but wizard was not generating phone no.

    after trying a lot i went for reinstallation.

    To be specific my qustion is if WGA tray is spyware and collects system information I am least bothered as i have already opted in  in many data collection program of Ms and other vendors.

    My qustion is if it collects system info thats ok but if it interfere with system programs then its a serious issue , As i am tired of reinstalling windows then downloading updates then restoring backup of my personal files.

    Consider my case inserting a internal modem should not cause windows to reactivate as no substantial change in hardware has occured i think this was due to excessive checks by WGA tool

    Thanks in advance

    Adi

    A K
    Thursday, September 11, 2008 4:54 PM

Answers

  • Adi10,

    Thank you for visiting the Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) program forum. There is a broad scope of information I'd like to pass along to you.

    First visit the following link to learn about WGA Software. See below:

    http://www.microsoft.com/genuine

    Second, I'd like to give you some information about how software licensing works. See the following:

    Thank you for visiting the Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) program forum.  The purpose of this forum is the support of the WGA program.  Your question is off topic as well as outside my area of knowledge. I would like to provide some information which may help. There are two types of licenses for XP that consumers will encounter. Retail (aka the full version product), and OEM (original equipment manufacturer product).

    Retail licenses may be moved from one computer to another, as long as the license is activated on one computer at a time and as long as the previous installation of the license is removed from the previously licensed computer.

    OEM licenses for XP are tied to the first computer onto which they are installed and the license is not permitted to be moved on any other computer.  For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is really just a collection of parts, Microsoft has established that the motherboard is the base or "defining" component, and the OEM license is permanently tied to the motherboard.

    There is one exception. If a motherboard becomes defective, you are permitted to change it and reinstall your OEM XP license to it.  You should replace it with an identical board or the manufacturer's designated replacement. OEM licenses obtained thru a major manufacturer that uses SLP technology set the recovery or repair CD to look for certain bits in the BIOS of the official manufacturer's motherboards.  If such bits are not found, as they would not be if you replaced the defective board with one not from the original computer manufacturer, then the CD will refuse to install XP. The correct thing to do in these cases is to install XP using a genuine system builder/OEM Microsoft Windows XP CD-ROM, which does not have the SLP technology.  When installing, be sure to use the Product Key on the Certificate of Authenticity affixed to the computer, and NOT the Product Key that came with the CD-ROM. (Note that retail and Volume License CDs will NOT accept OEM product keys, returning an "invalid product key" error.)  Finally, when installation is complete, do a Telephonic Activation because the OEM PK on the COA will not be accepted by the automated online activation system.  If the automated telephone system also refuses activation, choose the option to speak with an activation rep and explain that you are replacing a defective motherboard and cannot use the manufacturer-supplied recovery CD-ROM.

    One does not "lose their license" for XP if the motherboard becomes defective and has to be replaced.  If the computer owner chooses to use, or because of availability is forced to use, a board that is not a direct or identical replacement, there has to be a mechanism to accommodate these circumstances, and that is why a telephonic activation is authorized.

    Note that if the computer owner decides to replace the motherboard for performance reasons or to add features or new technology, the defective exception is NOT applicable and a new license for XP is required to be purchased. A clean installation destroys all data on the hard disk, so be sure to back up any valuable email, pictures, docs, music, etc that you cannot afford to lose.

    Additional Information:

    For licensing questions, please call 1-800-426-9400 (select option 4), Monday through Friday, 6:00 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. (PST) to speak directly to a Microsoft licensing specialist.

    Volume licensing customers can use the Microsoft Volume Licensing site to find contact information in their locations. See the following link:

    http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/default.mspx  


    And thirdly, a bit about hardware shift and Personally Identifiable Information.  If you change out a lot of hardware that is plugged into your motherboard, you will eventually be prompted to activate. Remember, if you ware within the terms of your EULA or End User License Agreement, you can telelphone activate and speak to a live representative for assistance. And PII. Windows Genuine Advantage software does not collect any Personally Identifiable Information. It does how ever verify your license types, and your bios/motherboard information, to ensure your EULA's are properly within terms. For more information, see the Genuine Advantage website at the beginning of this response.

    Thank you for visiting us in the WGA program forums.

    Rick, MS


    • Marked as answer by RickImAPC Thursday, September 11, 2008 5:57 PM
    Thursday, September 11, 2008 5:57 PM

All replies

  • Adi10,

    Thank you for visiting the Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) program forum. There is a broad scope of information I'd like to pass along to you.

    First visit the following link to learn about WGA Software. See below:

    http://www.microsoft.com/genuine

    Second, I'd like to give you some information about how software licensing works. See the following:

    Thank you for visiting the Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) program forum.  The purpose of this forum is the support of the WGA program.  Your question is off topic as well as outside my area of knowledge. I would like to provide some information which may help. There are two types of licenses for XP that consumers will encounter. Retail (aka the full version product), and OEM (original equipment manufacturer product).

    Retail licenses may be moved from one computer to another, as long as the license is activated on one computer at a time and as long as the previous installation of the license is removed from the previously licensed computer.

    OEM licenses for XP are tied to the first computer onto which they are installed and the license is not permitted to be moved on any other computer.  For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is really just a collection of parts, Microsoft has established that the motherboard is the base or "defining" component, and the OEM license is permanently tied to the motherboard.

    There is one exception. If a motherboard becomes defective, you are permitted to change it and reinstall your OEM XP license to it.  You should replace it with an identical board or the manufacturer's designated replacement. OEM licenses obtained thru a major manufacturer that uses SLP technology set the recovery or repair CD to look for certain bits in the BIOS of the official manufacturer's motherboards.  If such bits are not found, as they would not be if you replaced the defective board with one not from the original computer manufacturer, then the CD will refuse to install XP. The correct thing to do in these cases is to install XP using a genuine system builder/OEM Microsoft Windows XP CD-ROM, which does not have the SLP technology.  When installing, be sure to use the Product Key on the Certificate of Authenticity affixed to the computer, and NOT the Product Key that came with the CD-ROM. (Note that retail and Volume License CDs will NOT accept OEM product keys, returning an "invalid product key" error.)  Finally, when installation is complete, do a Telephonic Activation because the OEM PK on the COA will not be accepted by the automated online activation system.  If the automated telephone system also refuses activation, choose the option to speak with an activation rep and explain that you are replacing a defective motherboard and cannot use the manufacturer-supplied recovery CD-ROM.

    One does not "lose their license" for XP if the motherboard becomes defective and has to be replaced.  If the computer owner chooses to use, or because of availability is forced to use, a board that is not a direct or identical replacement, there has to be a mechanism to accommodate these circumstances, and that is why a telephonic activation is authorized.

    Note that if the computer owner decides to replace the motherboard for performance reasons or to add features or new technology, the defective exception is NOT applicable and a new license for XP is required to be purchased. A clean installation destroys all data on the hard disk, so be sure to back up any valuable email, pictures, docs, music, etc that you cannot afford to lose.

    Additional Information:

    For licensing questions, please call 1-800-426-9400 (select option 4), Monday through Friday, 6:00 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. (PST) to speak directly to a Microsoft licensing specialist.

    Volume licensing customers can use the Microsoft Volume Licensing site to find contact information in their locations. See the following link:

    http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/default.mspx  


    And thirdly, a bit about hardware shift and Personally Identifiable Information.  If you change out a lot of hardware that is plugged into your motherboard, you will eventually be prompted to activate. Remember, if you ware within the terms of your EULA or End User License Agreement, you can telelphone activate and speak to a live representative for assistance. And PII. Windows Genuine Advantage software does not collect any Personally Identifiable Information. It does how ever verify your license types, and your bios/motherboard information, to ensure your EULA's are properly within terms. For more information, see the Genuine Advantage website at the beginning of this response.

    Thank you for visiting us in the WGA program forums.

    Rick, MS


    • Marked as answer by RickImAPC Thursday, September 11, 2008 5:57 PM
    Thursday, September 11, 2008 5:57 PM
  • Thank you rick for clarifying.

    Regards

    Adi

    A K
    Friday, September 12, 2008 10:51 AM
  • You're welcome.

    Make it a great day!

    Rick, MS
    Friday, September 12, 2008 3:10 PM