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Hard drives won't shut down / motherboard (drivers) not fully supported RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have the issues described below after setup and would appreciate any input as to
    solutions.

    None of the three installed hard drives power down.  I have "Server Balanced Processor
    Power and Performance" enabled in power schemes under power options
    properties with the following settings: HD's = 20 min & Monitor = 15 min. 


    The "PCI Simple Communications Controller" in Device Manager has a yellow exclamation point indicating that no driver is installed.  The only (winXP) driver available for this board (Intel DQ965GF) reports operating system not supported.  I expected MS to include driver support,
    especially for a recent mainstream desktop business board. 

     

    WHS also did not support the onboard audio or LAN on this board.  Luckily, Intel's
    latest drivers for XP worked for me. 


    Thanks,

     

     

    Sunday, November 11, 2007 2:19 AM

All replies

  • If Microsoft included every driver for every motherboard, add-in and chipset out there they would have to send a library full of DVD's.  The OEM version means that it is us to you to solve those problems if the included drivers do not work.

     

    If you are using a pre-built system (Dell, etc.) go to their website and find compatible drivers for Windows 2003 and install them.  Sometimes XP drivers will work, but not always.  If it is a system you built, you will have to track down the drivers via the motherboard vendor.

     

    As far as drives sleeping goes, this might not be possible.  WHS is constantly doing stuff in the background and from what I have experienced there is no "down time" for it to sleep.  This is especially true if you are using folder duplication enabled and have more than 2 hard drives installed. 

     

     

    Sunday, November 11, 2007 4:10 AM
  • My system is home built and based on the Intel board I listed.  My only point was that a current, mainstream board manufactured by Intel should be supported.  I've already e-mailed Intel's tech support about the problem but they have not replied as yet.  I'm not holding my breath.  They have only one driver listed (supports 2000, xp & Vista) and apparently it is not compatible with the Windows Server 2003 OS.  I find your comments on the drives not sleeping interesting, though.  As my first post stated, I'm using 3 drives, and yes, I am using DE.  I guess this makes sense, but if true, why isn't the choice to turn off the hard drive(s) in Power Options grayed out?  I expect better from MS after spending nearly $ 200.00 for an OS.  Previously, I used Win 2000 with the same three drives (one for system, the other two set up in a RAID configuration.  All three drives would power down!  Less noise, heat and therefore more longevity for the drives, right?

     

    Thanks,

    Monday, November 12, 2007 3:04 AM
  •  mikeyd55 wrote:
    but if true, why isn't the choice to turn off the hard drive(s) in Power Options grayed out?
      Because we're not supposed to use a lot of the tools available from the desktop, as they c  n break DE.  They're there, but....

    Remember - WHS isn't quite its own OS.  It's built off of SBS2k3.  So, the normal SBS2k3 tools are still there.  We just need to remember that we can't muck around with a lot of them. 

     

    As for drivers - that's Intel's fault, not MS.  Sucks, yes.  But, respectfully, you need to direct your ire at your hardware vendor, not your OS vendor.

    Monday, November 12, 2007 4:17 AM
  • Mikey, Windows Home Server is based on Windows Server 2003. You will find hardware that has been tested to support that OS in the Windows Server Catalog. Regarding included drivers, why should Microsoft write a driver for hardware that they didn't build, if the hardware manufacturer doesn't do so? I agree with your contention, in that I feel that Intel should support Windows Server 2003 with their drivers.

    As for the longevitiy of your drives, I would take a look at the research paper that Google published earlier this year. There are some interesting conclusions in it.
    Monday, November 12, 2007 4:26 AM
    Moderator
  • I did note the default web page on start-up, which recommends that changes not be made from the desktop, but I don't understand how - or why for that matter - one should have to worry about "breaking" the OS.   I guess I have a lot to learn about server OS's.  I do agree that Intel is ultimately responsible to produce the necessary drivers.

     

    Thanks, 

     

    Tuesday, November 13, 2007 1:05 AM
  •  

    Exclamation points in device manager are unfinished business for me.  I did contact Intel tech support but they've yet to respond.  Looks like I may have to consider a mb that has up front driver support for WS2003.

     

    I looked over the research paper, in particular the conclusion, but am still not convinced that spinning down the drives is not a good thing to do.  

     

    Thanks,  

    Tuesday, November 13, 2007 1:30 AM
  •  mikeyd55 wrote:

    I did note the default web page on start-up, which recommends that changes not be made from the desktop, but I don't understand how - or why for that matter - one should have to worry about "breaking" the OS.   I guess I have a lot to learn about server OS's.  I do agree that Intel is ultimately responsible to produce the necessary drivers.

     

    Thanks, 

     

    It's not that one needs to worry about breaking the OS as a whole.  Rather, it's making changes (from the desktop) that may affect the storage pool, mainly, that is the potential issue.

    Reason being is that, due to Drive Extender, WHS treats the storage drives (array might be a better term) a lot differently than SBS2k3 (which it's built off of) does.

     

    You can still do things from the desktop (such as install software; IP config should be safe; and, from what I've heard, changing IIS ports is OK, too.)
    FWIW, I've managed to get YAC (Caller ID broadcast) installed (and, configured as a service, no less!), as well as Windows Fax service (very cool.) 

    Tuesday, November 13, 2007 1:53 AM