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Restore Failure RRS feed

  • Question

  • My oldest laptop is an IBM T20 - anemic by modern standards but I keep it running (XP Pro) and up-to-date.  Why?  Well, it's handy when enjoying a long soak in the tub, and if I were to get it drenched it wouldn't be a great financial loss.

    I recently found that I couldn't do Windows updates or MSE updates, tracked it down to a defective disk structure on the C: drive, and repair attempts with CHKDSK partially clobbered Windows.  I decided to just do a full restore from WHS from a time prior to the flaky behavior.

    The restore reported that it couldn't find any network drivers for the Intel PRO/100 wired drivers.  It could deal with the wireless card, but there doesn't seem to be any way to provide the WPA information so I think I'm limited to wired connections.

    Attempts to find drivers on the web to put on a thumb drive were for naught - everything I found was in the form of an EXE file that actually installed the drivers; there was no facility to dump them to a folder. 

    Then I decided to read what WHS was actually telling me, and it suggested that there would be a recovery drivers folder within the Windows directory, and that this folder could be copied to the thumb drive.  How reasonable and intelligent!  So I did that.

    To my surprise, while the drivers do, in fact, get picked up correctly when prompting the recovery process, they don't seem to work correctly.  I either blue screen quite early after recovery starts, or the recovery goes for a while, with the progress bar maybe 20% done, and then things just hang in perpetuity.  At this point, due to the partial recovery, there's no NTLDR.SYS and the machine is non-bootable.  I've tried enough times to think this is not a sporadic problem.

    I've got a cheap USB nic on order, and perhaps that will be the ultimate solution, but I'm curious if someone has a feel for what may have failed in what I thought would be a routine restorative process.  It's no big deal to reinstall WinXP from scratch, but I'd obviously prefer to just drop in a WHS backup image.

    Art

     

    Friday, August 13, 2010 10:59 PM

All replies

  • Thank you - In the absence of any other suggestions, I'm going to try the USB first, just because it's so easy, and if its drivers are similarly unrecognized I'll give this a try.

    Apologies for asking something that turns out to be in the FAQ.

    Art

     

     

    Saturday, August 14, 2010 3:41 AM
  • Thank you - In the absence of any other suggestions, I'm going to try the USB first, just because it's so easy, and if its drivers are similarly unrecognized I'll give this a try.

    Apologies for asking something that turns out to be in the FAQ.

    Art

    Also, in case you're using a RealTek NIC, you might want to check out this FAQ post as well.
    Saturday, August 14, 2010 4:01 AM
    Moderator
  • in case you're using a RealTek NIC

    Or even if it's not a RealTek one.
     -- .
    .
    .
    .

    "kariya21 [MVP]" wrote in message news:9d9ec3d1-bf8a-4d9c-a030-d752dc717b4b@communitybridge.codeplex.com...

    Thank you - In the absence of any other suggestions, I'm going to try the USB first, just because it's so easy, and if its drivers are similarly unrecognized I'll give this a try.

    Apologies for asking something that turns out to be in the FAQ.

    Art

    Also, in case you're using a RealTek NIC, you might want to check out this <http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/whsfaq/thread/b14e3cf2-7b02-4569-8c26-c75b7a58d6e7> FAQ post as well.


    Have a nice day!
    Saturday, August 14, 2010 5:01 AM
  • Decided not to wait for the USB nic to arrive, and gave the ClientRestoreWizard a shot.  It's so easy to pull drives from IBM / Lenovo laptops, so why wait?  I stuck it in a USB enclosure an attached that to a much newer Lenovo laptop.

    The wizard was easy to use, and it took about 35 minutes to restore the massive 20 gig C: partition - the only partition on that drive.  Afterwards, I could see that the disk was readable and had the various folders that I expected.

    Unfortunately, upon putting it back into the T20, it wouldn't boot - just got a flashing cursor rather than the expected XP bootup sequence.

    I booted off an XP CD, went to the repair console, and confirmed that the disk could be routinely interrogated.  I tried FIXBOOT and FIXMBR without success.  The latter always reported a non-standard MBR and warned me about possible loss of partitions if I were to proceed.  Several instances of that command, allowing it to proceed, never remedied that issue.

    This is exactly the same symptomology as I reported a few months ago, when I couldn't restore my main desktop.  I ultimately reinstalled Windows 7 and all my application, and retrieved the data with WHS.  Interestingly, on that desktop, I had need a few weeks later to purchase another disk, and on a whim I stuck it into the desktop, did a full restore, and the resultant disk booted up just fine, although I had no need for it.

    Could I be missing something obvious?  Is restoring the C: partition alleged to be sufficient for a restore operation, or is there some more-global structure that I should be restoring?

    Art

    Sunday, August 15, 2010 3:14 AM
  • Unfortunately, upon putting it back into the T20, it wouldn't boot - just got a flashing cursor rather than the expected XP bootup sequence.

    I booted off an XP CD, went to the repair console, and confirmed that the disk could be routinely interrogated.  I tried FIXBOOT and FIXMBR without success.  The latter always reported a non-standard MBR and warned me about possible loss of partitions if I were to proceed.  Several instances of that command, allowing it to proceed, never remedied that issue.

    My guess would be that the original T20 system disk contained a hidden boot partition, a custom boot sector or maybe both. OEM Manufacturs like IBM use these solutions to enable system diagnostics or a factory restore. The hidden partition was not backed up (i.e. not restored) and/or the customized boot sector could not be properly restored by WHS. As a result of this the system can not properly boot. Fixing the MBR (means writing a standard master boot record) will not always resolve these kind of problems.

    I think the best way out (if at all possible) would be trying to do a full "repair" of the OS installation using the orignal IBM/XP installation CD.
    For this you boot from the XP CD, select ENTER ("setup Windows XP now): setup should then list your current installation. Selet it and choose "R" for repairing...
    Not sure if you allready tried this?

    - Theo.


    No home server like Home Server
    Sunday, August 15, 2010 11:56 AM
    Moderator
  • As reasonable as that theory sounds, I believe it isn't the case - this was an upgraded system disk (7200 RPM) that I had done the XP installation from scratch.
    Sunday, August 15, 2010 1:28 PM
  • Hi,

    (*silence*)
    Did you by any chance use an external disk managing tool (e.g. Acronis, Ghost) for formatting and/or partitioning that might have altered the disk in a way that WHS can not properly handle?

    - Theo.


    No home server like Home Server
    Sunday, August 15, 2010 9:02 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi,

    (*silence*)
    Did you by any chance use an external disk managing tool (e.g. Acronis, Ghost) for formatting and/or partitioning that might have altered the disk in a way that WHS can not properly handle?

    - Theo.


    No home server like Home Server


    Negative - don't own any programs of that nature.

    The situation has gotten a lot more serious.  I had need to restore a single file from on of the other machine's backups; I accidentally deleted part of that .htm file.  Now, from all my machines, when I open the WHS console to open a backup so as to restore the file, the "Backup Details" screen for the T20 opens up.  I can't close or get rid of it, even after opening the T20 backup that I don't particularly need.  I'm really in a bind right now.

    Art

    Monday, August 16, 2010 3:45 AM
  • The situation has gotten a lot more serious.  I had need to restore a single file from on of the other machine's backups; I accidentally deleted part of that .htm file.  Now, from all my machines, when I open the WHS console to open a backup so as to restore the file, the "Backup Details" screen for the T20 opens up.  I can't close or get rid of it, even after opening the T20 backup that I don't particularly need.  I'm really in a bind right now.

    Art

    I'll answer my own question - rebooting the WHS machine made that one go away.   Back to the much-less-serious T20 issue.  Maybe I'll try a full format of the disk, as there's nothing to lose.

    Art

    Monday, August 16, 2010 4:19 AM