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Which book suits me the best? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am a student. I have registered a Dreamspark account recently and is able to download Microsoft Visual Studio Professional 2013.

    I have no experience of programming, and almost knew nothing about it, I know only some simple commands in Windows Command Prompt.

    Now, the problem is which book is best for me to learn Microsoft Visual C# 2013?

    Is a Microsoft Visual C# 2012 book same as the 2013's?

    I can't find a book about Microsoft Visual C# 2013 for beginners at Amazon.com.

    Can anyone help me out?

    I am intend to learn and create apps.

    Is there any book suits for me? If there is, please send me the websites.

    I really need some experts to lead me.

    Monday, January 13, 2014 10:02 AM

Answers

  • Hi, Learning-guy.

    Yes - you can actually use books for VS 2005 (Visual Studio 2005), VS 2008, VS 2010, VS 2012, and VS 2013. However, when you use books that are closer in version number to 2013 (VS 2012, for example), the screenshots will be more similar to VS 2013. As well, the latest books will discuss the latest libraries and patterns used with the newer versions of .NET.

    Because VS 2012 and VS 2013 are so similar a released only one year apart, going with a VS 2012 will be almost identical. I suspect a lot of authors and book publishers were caught off guard by such a fast release of the next version.

    To be honest, the most important concepts that you must learn have been there since it was released with VS 2002. These concepts include Solutions/Projects, Building, csc.exe, OOP (Object-Oriented Programming), CTS (Common Type System), Garbage collection, .NET assemblies, and much more.

    When considering a book, always look at the user comments on the US Amazon site. People are brutally honest if a book is great or should be ignored. Here are a few books you should consider. This list is not all the books you should consider - just some of them:

    As well, consider all the free online training at Microsoft Virtual Academy:
    http://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com

    Good luck!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson

    Monday, January 13, 2014 12:47 PM
    Answerer

All replies

  • Hi, Learning-guy.

    Yes - you can actually use books for VS 2005 (Visual Studio 2005), VS 2008, VS 2010, VS 2012, and VS 2013. However, when you use books that are closer in version number to 2013 (VS 2012, for example), the screenshots will be more similar to VS 2013. As well, the latest books will discuss the latest libraries and patterns used with the newer versions of .NET.

    Because VS 2012 and VS 2013 are so similar a released only one year apart, going with a VS 2012 will be almost identical. I suspect a lot of authors and book publishers were caught off guard by such a fast release of the next version.

    To be honest, the most important concepts that you must learn have been there since it was released with VS 2002. These concepts include Solutions/Projects, Building, csc.exe, OOP (Object-Oriented Programming), CTS (Common Type System), Garbage collection, .NET assemblies, and much more.

    When considering a book, always look at the user comments on the US Amazon site. People are brutally honest if a book is great or should be ignored. Here are a few books you should consider. This list is not all the books you should consider - just some of them:

    As well, consider all the free online training at Microsoft Virtual Academy:
    http://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com

    Good luck!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson

    Monday, January 13, 2014 12:47 PM
    Answerer
  • Thanks.

    By the way, are those 3 books enough to lead me through the beginner stage?

    • Edited by Learning-guy Wednesday, January 15, 2014 8:30 AM Adding content
    Wednesday, January 15, 2014 7:42 AM
  • It depends on what you mean by "beginner stage."

    So long as you are not referring to meeting the requirements of a specific certification exam or class, then yes. Any of these books will get you past the beginning stages of learning to program in C# and the .NET platform.

    If you thoroughly go all the way through even just one of these books, so long as you understood the content, you will be well on your way to take on advanced C# topics.

    Good luck!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson


    Wednesday, January 15, 2014 12:57 PM
    Answerer
  • Thanks a lot!

    Newbie

    Wednesday, January 15, 2014 2:43 PM