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How Do You Know Available Hard Drive Capacity In Multiple Hard Drive WHS Set Up? RRS feed

  • Question

  • If you can add hard drives of any size to WHS and all of the capacity of these hard drives is used, how does one know how much capacity is available especially since duplicate files are kept on separate drives. The installation instructions say that when a new hard drive is added, storage space is added proportionally.

    What does this mean exactly? Can anyone give an example?

     

    For example, if you duplicate all your files and you have a 300GB and an 800GB hard drive and the 300GB hard drive is full, presumably all of the files that you want duplicated will be duplicated on the 800GB file. This leaves 500GB of unused space since there is no more room to duplicate files.   Does this mean that in this set up you have 300GB of usable capacity? If you come from the world of RAID, the extended drive concept is a little bit difficult to get your head around!

     

    If anyone can explain using the above example, I would appreciate it.

     

    Thanks,

     

    Sunday, January 20, 2008 9:03 AM

Answers

  • In your example, you have no more space for duplicated files. If you were to create another file in a share flagged for duplication, you'd start to see network health warnings saying that duplication was failing. You still have space for files that aren't duplicated, however.

    Does that answer your question?
    Sunday, January 20, 2008 2:32 PM
    Moderator
  • Hey Regis. I'm an infrastructure guy too, and Drive Extender is an odd concept to get your head around. Once you do, you'll wish Veritas, EMC, NetApp et al offered it too Smile

     

    Have a read through http://download.microsoft.com/download/2/F/C/2FC09C20-587F-4F16-AA33-C6C4C75FB3DD/Windows_Home_Server_Drive_Extender.pdf

     

    Basically - it's not like RAID where each disk in the array is only used up to the capacity of the smallest disk. Duplication only duplicates the file on two disks, and the rest of the space available on those disks can be used for anything else.

     

    If you've already got duplication enabled for your folders and you add a 500 GB disk, that's 500 GB of extra space, regardless of what the rest of your disks are. Think of it as JBOD, with directory-level mirroring.

     

    Sunday, January 20, 2008 6:36 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • In your example, you have no more space for duplicated files. If you were to create another file in a share flagged for duplication, you'd start to see network health warnings saying that duplication was failing. You still have space for files that aren't duplicated, however.

    Does that answer your question?
    Sunday, January 20, 2008 2:32 PM
    Moderator
  • Hey Regis. I'm an infrastructure guy too, and Drive Extender is an odd concept to get your head around. Once you do, you'll wish Veritas, EMC, NetApp et al offered it too Smile

     

    Have a read through http://download.microsoft.com/download/2/F/C/2FC09C20-587F-4F16-AA33-C6C4C75FB3DD/Windows_Home_Server_Drive_Extender.pdf

     

    Basically - it's not like RAID where each disk in the array is only used up to the capacity of the smallest disk. Duplication only duplicates the file on two disks, and the rest of the space available on those disks can be used for anything else.

     

    If you've already got duplication enabled for your folders and you add a 500 GB disk, that's 500 GB of extra space, regardless of what the rest of your disks are. Think of it as JBOD, with directory-level mirroring.

     

    Sunday, January 20, 2008 6:36 PM
    Moderator
  • I understand. Got it thanks idolatry.

     

    Monday, January 21, 2008 8:43 PM