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3 features that make WHS a no go for me RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm pretty sure that these have all been brought up before, but they deserve reitterating as they will stop me from buying a WHS box in the future.

     

    1. x64 support - Come on Microsoft you're supposed to be making this push towards 64-bit yet this won't back up any of the newer machines that people buy? Rediculous.

     

    2. Domain Support - Ok I realize that the average person is using the home addition, but think of this as an up sell opportunity. You could offer the single sign on and other great domain features to home users pretty easily. Just have the WHS connector software automatically add the computer to the domain and migrate/merge their user accounts onto the ones on the server. This would be a great additional feature for WHS that I can't believe you left out.

     

    3. External storage backup - Again this feature isn't for everyone but it's important to me. I have a NAS box and a Linux file server with a pretty massive amount of storage between them. It would be great if I could add SMB file shares into the storage pool. This one I can understand you leaving out, but it is a feature that will be needed since more and more people are buying extrernal networked hardrives (NASes).

     

    Like I said I know these have come up before but these a make or break features for me to use this. So far this product is a really good idea, you've just got a bit more to do to really make this a killer product.

     

    Oh and one nice to have feature: What about backing up my Xbox 360's hardrive? That way if something happens to it I don't loose all my saved games and such.

    Tuesday, June 19, 2007 1:57 PM

All replies

  • Evening,

     

    1. THEY ARE working on x64 support, it's just taking longer than expected.

    2. That could well eat into the SBS type market, but could well make it into future builds.

    3. It's easy to use a NAS box, I use one to act as backup for the WHS and use a freeware program to copy from there to the server as required.

     

    Don't forget this will be version One of a long-term product; the ideas sheet the WHS team have shown, lists lots of things that they would like to see included, but time precludes it.

     

    Colin

    Tuesday, June 19, 2007 4:51 PM
  • I realize that this is only the first version. That's why I pointed out the three features I would want before I purchased this.

     

    As for eating into the SBS market... I really don't think so. The appeal of SBS isn't so much the domain controller as the integrated excahnge server and all the other little extras that set SBS apart from regular W2k3.

    Wednesday, June 20, 2007 1:41 PM
  • Domain Support:

     

    I just don't see this one at all... WHS is designed/marketed for a HOME environment, where there isn't currently, typically, a Domain created or active.  And you've already got single sign-on for WHS, since you have to match username/password between the PCs and WHS server.  Since a home environment wouldn't have additional authentication based resources on it, there's no need for further authentication replication.

     

    What "great domain features" do you think are relevant/needed/wanted for the AVERAGE user?  Remember, this product is not marketed to the Power User/IT Professional.  Hell, I am an IT professional, and I don't run a domain at home!

     

    As to the External Storage Backup idea.  I can see both sides to this one...  I had external NAS boxes before WHS.  I decided to get rid of them, incorporating their hard drives into the WHS server, and migrating the data over, but I was able to sell the two NAS systems, minus drives, for the cost of the new WHS server hardware.  Why run both?  WHS is specifically designed to perform the backup as well as central storage needs.  The 2 types of devices are completely redundant.  Now, if you had the NAS devices already, I can understand not wanting to go through the hassle of integrating the physical drives; but if a user has WHS, then they probably wouldn't be purchasing any additional NAS solutions.

     

    I think the main problem with this idea, from the development teams point of view, is reliability...  How do you maintain reliable access to data on an external device?  Especially a device that you can't control or manage, and that's connected by a network connection (as opposed to an eSata/USB type external device).  Physical Drive failures should be a relatively rare occurance in day to day operations, but I could see a situation where that NAS box is unable to maintain reliable connectivity, due to network congestion, or flakey hardware/software/firmware.  Finally, even if you could maintain reliable connections, how does WHS verify the data was written correctly?  Short of doing a read/compare operation after the write completes?  Within the WHS server, this is accomplished through the OS/drivers.

    Wednesday, June 20, 2007 2:09 PM
  • The biggest advantage of doamining would be roaming profiles at home. Now if you want your docs to follow you at home you either need some kinda of remote syncing software or just keep everything on a share. The only reason that I have a w2k server box running on my network at home is to allow roaming profiles so that all my settings and documents follow me from computer to computer.

     

    Granted most people don't need this now, but as you get more and more computers in the home this would be a much bigger deal and it would simplify this mysterious thing called networking and document sharing that so many home users just don't have a clue about.

    Thursday, June 21, 2007 3:52 AM
  •  pboyd04 wrote:

    The biggest advantage of doamining would be roaming profiles at home. Now if you want your docs to follow you at home you either need some kinda of remote syncing software or just keep everything on a share. The only reason that I have a w2k server box running on my network at home is to allow roaming profiles so that all my settings and documents follow me from computer to computer.

    Granted most people don't need this now, but as you get more and more computers in the home this would be a much bigger deal and it would simplify this mysterious thing called networking and document sharing that so many home users just don't have a clue about.



    Have you checked out configuring a Groove folder with Office 2007.  That will do exactly what it is you want without a domain or anything.  I just found this little gem out and have been testing/using it quite a bit here lately.. works pretty well, assuming you haver Office 2007.
    Thursday, June 21, 2007 7:53 PM
  • @pboyd04 - If users point their MyDocs to their WHS share then their docs are available from any machine... and the shared folder speaks for itself Smile

     

    I do run a domain here, but WHS is outside it and there is no conflict - I use the same passwords for both.

     

    I also have a NAS box, which I had before WHS for backups and common media, so that acts as the common library for WiMP on my various machines for music, TV etc - and I'm keeping that going till WHS hits RTM, as we are still using a pre-release version.

    Thursday, June 21, 2007 10:24 PM