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Colly Lord's issue RRS feed

  • Question

  • I've recently been getting the same not genuine message on my Windows 7 64 bit Home Premium. When directed to the validation site, I instead am prompted to download and install Microsoft Security Essentials.  I could not locate (by searching) any links to the older MS site that would download the GenuineCheck.exe file.  THIS page http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/validate/?displaylang=en takes me to the Validation process and downloads legitcheck.hta, which after running, again takes me to the download page for Microsoft Security Essentials - without validating my Windows yet. I FINALLY located the page (completely by accident, while looking for the WinHlp32.exe utility for Windows 7) that would download the GenuineCheck.exe file here

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/ExeValidation.aspx?familyid=258aa5ec-e3d9-4228-8844-008e02b32a2c

    THAT page and the GenuineCheck.exe utility worked without redirecting me to the MSE download page.

    As GenuineCheck.exe said my windows was valid, I wondered why I kept getting the notice.  Re-validating windows would get rid of it, but it keeps coming back after the PC has been up several hours.  I finally found that all I need to do when the message appears, is go to Start, right-click-on-Computer, and select Properties, then scroll down to the Windows Activation and see that my windows is indeed, Activated and shows that Windows IS activated with a 20-digit key that shows OEM in the second segment. When I do this, the not genuine message immediately disappears - until the next day or the day after.  It also goes away when I simply reboot.

    Perhaps my problem is caused by the fact that Best Buy imaged my hard drive from a network install image in their GeekSquad shop at the store, and the OEM key is maybe theirs, and is NOT the same 25-digit Product Key that appears on the Dell sticker on top of the PC. Or are the Activation Key and the Product Key different keys?

    What I find suspicious is that I have a genuine, valid, activated Windows on my PC and yet the message keeps returning, AND the instructions keep leading me to a (genuinely Microsoft) web site that wants me to download and install MSE.  It really is Microsoft's Security Essentials and not a bogus site or product, but I'm not installing it because I already have Webroot Internet Security Essentials installed and protecting my PC. This makes it seem to me that Microsoft is spamming my machine with spurious messages in an attempt to get me to install their MSE product.

    If you have the same issues and want to test with GenuineCheck.exe utility, the second link in this post will get you to it, OR, you can search Microsoft for the WinHlp32.exe download and it will lead you to GenuineCheck before it lets you download the WinHlp32.exe utility anyway.

    If you have the 'not genuine' message appear on a valid and activated issue of Windows, and want to try the simplest method to get rid of it (temporarily), either reboot, or check the Computer Properties and see if it goes away just for being rebooted or looked at, like mine does.

    I really would like to know why it keeps coming back though, and how to get rid of it permanently (without hacking my system to remove WGA as some sites suggest.  I want to KEEP my system legal.)

    *EDIT*:

    Aha!  I just found this in Darin's post above:

    "  The problem is that the key currently being used in the PC is known as a OEM SLP key which are only used in Windows that come pre-installed in a PC from a Large Manufacturer. The key works by interacting with a OEM Bios Flag only found on the motherboard of a PC from a Large Manufacturer.

     So if your PC was manufactured by a Large Manufacturer, then to resolve your issue, you just need to change the Product key to the one listed on the CoA sticker."

    I shall try changing my key to the one on the COA sticker and see if that solves the problem.  I expect it will (or else I may never be able to reboot again - lol)  I think  I will call and ask the Best Buy Geek Squad first, if that's what I should do.

     

     

     

     


    All 'computer errors' can be traced back to human mistakes.
    Saturday, January 22, 2011 1:54 AM

Answers

  • It appears the Original Poster has edited his/her original post with the resolution. 

    NOTE: Due to forum mechanics, I am unable to mark the original post as the Answer so I am marking this post as the answer, instead.


    Darin MS
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, January 25, 2011 8:30 PM
    Tuesday, January 25, 2011 8:28 PM

All replies

  • "Colly Lord" wrote in message news:175cfbed-1b5f-40d0-95ad-dcc3882d907d...

    I've recently been getting the same not genuine message on my Windows 7 64 bit Home Premium. When directed to the validation site, I instead am prompted to download and install Microsoft Security Essentials.  I could not locate (by searching) any links to the older MS site that would download the GenuineCheck.exe file.  Please repost your problem in YOUR OWN, NEW thread - together with an MGADiag report

    To properly analyse and solve problems with Activation and Validation, we need to see a full copy of the report produced by the MGADiag tool (download and save to desktop - http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012 )
    Once saved, run the tool.
    Click on the Continue button, which will produce the report.
    To copy the report to your response, click on the Copy button in the tool (ignore any error messages at this point), and then paste (using either r-click/Paste, or Ctrl+V ) into your response.
     
    The page
    www.micrsofot.genuine.validate should immediately attempt to validate your machine - (you should see a message along the lines of 'Validating - do not move away from this page' until the process is complete, followed by 'thank you for using genuine Windows' and an offer of MSE and Windows Live)

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Saturday, January 22, 2011 8:19 AM
    Moderator
  • It appears the Original Poster has edited his/her original post with the resolution. 

    NOTE: Due to forum mechanics, I am unable to mark the original post as the Answer so I am marking this post as the answer, instead.


    Darin MS
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, January 25, 2011 8:30 PM
    Tuesday, January 25, 2011 8:28 PM
  • "Darin Smith MS" wrote in message news:faa94163-0371-4dab-aecf-b3992a5bc165...

    It appears the Original Poster has edited his/her original post with the resolution. 

    NOTE: Due to forum mechanics, I am unable to mark the original post as the Answer so I am marking this post as the answer, instead.


    Darin MS

    Oh, how I hate Forums, and their potential for unforeseen brickbats! (now I'll have to actually log in to see the 'fix'.
    :)
     
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Tuesday, January 25, 2011 9:24 PM
    Moderator
  • The page
    www.micrsofot.genuine.validate should immediately attempt to validate your machine - (you should see a message along the lines of 'Validating - do not move away from this page' until the process is complete, followed by 'thank you for using genuine Windows' and an offer of MSE and Windows Live)

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    I believe you meant to type http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/validate/  as the link provided doesn't really go anywhere.  The corrected link DOES give a window saying 'Validating - do not move away from this page' and THEN goes immediately to (as I said before) a page inviting me to download and install Microsoft Security Essentials - without ever telling me if Windows was validated or not.  I will attempt the suggested MGADiag tool and see what Microsoft says after analyzing the results. 

    By the way, I have now done the 'change product key' and put in the longer key shown on my COA sticker.  Oddly enough, although I put in the longer key, the properties page now shows a different, but still short, OEM key.  Belarc's Advisor reveals that my PC has both OEM keys (I have no idea how it managed that) and Belarc's Adviser also shows the new longer product key in parentheses on the same line after the new short OEM key - as though they are associated, which I believe is the case.

    My Windows 7 STILL gets the not genuine message (re-)appearing in the lower right corner (after a random number of hours up-time), but all I do is look at Computer Properties and it immediately goes away.  Checking computer properties is NOT a fix, so it is NOT an answer.  Changing the product key to the COA product key did NOT fix the problem so it was NOT the final solution either.  I am still looking for another way to fix it, but for now am content to know that it at least IS a valid, genuine installation of Windows, even if it has its doubts.

    I can make the not genuine message go away, but I can't make it STAY away.

    Still looking for a permanent solution.


    retired systems engineer
    Friday, January 28, 2011 3:15 PM
  • The MGADiag results are posted below.  I saw the error code 0x80070002 and 'File exists: No' message and Google searched that error code.

    I tried the solution listed here: http://www.brighthub.com/computing/windows-platform/articles/9194.aspx but when I start services.msc , there is no process named Automatic Updates, although there is a process named Windows Update.  It seems this error message and problem has been around since Windows XP and Vista, too.  When I go to troubleshoot Windows Update, using Windows 7's troubleshooter, it reports that no trouble is found (in denial of the 0x80070002 error message?)  Also, when I download and install and run the MRT (Malicious software removal tool) it reports there are no infections found. When I open the "Action Center" from the little flag in the system tray, then click on Windows Update, it reports that Windows is up to date (no problem appears there.)  Google search for 0x80070002 finds about 273,000 hits in 0.15 seconds.  This appears to be a common problem with many solutions offered, none of which seems to actually work in my case (and possibly in many other cases as well.)

    My windows is valid and genuine.

    My updates appear to be getting downloaded and installed just fine.

    When computer properties is checked, my Windows shows it's validated.

    After several hours (even of sitting idle, doing nothing), Windows decides it may not be genuine and issues the not valid message.

    When computer properties is checked again, my Windows again shows it's validated.

    Could the problem be simply that I'm running Windows?

     

    Here's the MGADiag result:

     

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 0
    Cached Online Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-9CMWV-PH8TB-76BKB
    Windows Product Key Hash: tbSaAB5atvFZV0QNF00dnuB7XMw=
    Windows Product ID: 00359-OEM-9802144-05494
    Windows Product ID Type: 8
    Windows License Type: COA SLP
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003
    ID: {4BAB4F2A-3D3A-4653-901D-085EE499D4AE}(3)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Product Name: Windows 7 Home Premium
    Architecture: 0x00000009
    Build lab: 7600.win7_gdr.100618-1621
    TTS Error:
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Vista WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109 N/A
    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: 025D1FF3-364-80041010_025D1FF3-229-80041010_025D1FF3-230-1_025D1FF3-517-80040154_025D1FF3-237-80040154_025D1FF3-238-2_025D1FF3-244-80070002_025D1FF3-258-3

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files (x86)\Mozilla Firefox\firefox.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{4BAB4F2A-3D3A-4653-901D-085EE499D4AE}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003</OS><Architecture>x64</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-76BKB</PKey><PID>00359-OEM-9802144-05494</PID><PIDType>8</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-1035961122-1356570870-2388303017</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Model>Inspiron 560  </Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>A00    </Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="6"/><Date>20091006000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>0EBB3607018400F8</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Pacific Standard Time(GMT-08:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM><OEMID>DELL  </OEMID><OEMTableID>ECS    </OEMTableID></OEM><GANotification/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/><Applications/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Spsys.log Content: 0x80070002

    Licensing Data-->
    Software licensing service version: 6.1.7600.16385

    Name: Windows(R) 7, HomePremium edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, OEM_COA_SLP channel
    Activation ID: 5e017a8a-f3f9-4167-b1bd-ba3e236a4d8f
    Application ID: 55c92734-d682-4d71-983e-d6ec3f16059f
    Extended PID: 00359-00196-021-405494-02-1033-7600.0000-0212011
    Installation ID: 019052963292834570370944960285695344143352828743697190
    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88338
    Machine Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88339
    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88341
    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340
    Partial Product Key: 76BKB
    License Status: Licensed
    Remaining Windows rearm count: 3
    Trusted time: 1/28/2011 7:22:50 AM

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    HrOffline: 0x00000000
    HrOnline: 0x00000000
    HealthStatus: 0x0000000000000000
    Event Time Stamp: 1:28:2011 07:00
    ActiveX: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    Admin Service: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    HealthStatus Bitmask Output:


    HWID Data-->
    HWID Hash Current: MgAAAAIAAQABAAEAAQABAAAAAwABAAEAln1UA+OciECCwO4zPF2N70K38GoU5yx1Rso=

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes
    Windows marker version: 0x20001
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: yes
    BIOS Information:
      ACPI Table Name    OEMID Value    OEMTableID Value
      APIC            100609        APIC1338
      FACP            100609        FACP1338
      HPET            100609        OEMHPET
      MCFG            100609        OEMMCFG
      SLIC            DELL          ECS   
      OEMB            100609        OEMB1338
      GSCI            100609        GMCHSCI
      SSDT            DpgPmm        CpuPm


    retired systems engineer
    Friday, January 28, 2011 3:55 PM
  • The page
    www.micrsofot.genuine.validate should immediately attempt to validate your machine - (you should see a message along the lines of 'Validating - do not move away from this page' until the process is complete, followed by 'thank you for using genuine Windows' and an offer of MSE and Windows Live)

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    I believe you meant to type http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/validate/  as the link provided doesn't really go anywhere.  The corrected link DOES give a window saying 'Validating - do not move away from this page' and THEN goes immediately to (as I said before) a page inviting me to download and install Microsoft Security Essentials - without ever telling me if Windows was validated or not.  I will attempt the suggested MGADiag tool and see what Microsoft says after analyzing the results. 

    By the way, I have now done the 'change product key' and put in the longer key shown on my COA sticker.  Oddly enough, although I put in the longer key, the properties page now shows a different, but still short, OEM key.  Belarc's Advisor reveals that my PC has both OEM keys (I have no idea how it managed that) and Belarc's Adviser also shows the new longer product key in parentheses on the same line after the new short OEM key - as though they are associated, which I believe is the case.

    My Windows 7 STILL gets the not genuine message (re-)appearing in the lower right corner (after a random number of hours up-time), but all I do is look at Computer Properties and it immediately goes away.  Checking computer properties is NOT a fix, so it is NOT an answer.  Changing the product key to the COA product key did NOT fix the problem so it was NOT the final solution either.  I am still looking for another way to fix it, but for now am content to know that it at least IS a valid, genuine installation of Windows, even if it has its doubts.

    I can make the not genuine message go away, but I can't make it STAY away.

    Still looking for a permanent solution.


    retired systems engineer

    Whoops!
    Sorry about that - fumble-fingers strike again.
     
    The fact that it's inviting you to download MSE means that it passed validation - read the part above, in green, where it says 'Welcome to Windows! Because Windows installed on your PC is genuine, enjoy the security, reliability and protection it provides."
     
    The Properties page does NOT show a Key - it shows a Product ID (as indicated on the page) - it is always 20 characters, not the 25 of the Key.
     
    There is obviously some piece of software preventing proper self-checking of the activation system on your PC - probably the anti-virus, or malware (or perhaps even that strange BIOS you have!)
     
    Please wait until the next time you get a non-genuine message, then create another MGADiag report without doing anything else, and paste it into Notepad - then bring up the System Properties page, to clear the error (unless MGADiag has already done that - it may), and run another report. Paste that into Notepad as well - then post both reports in your reply. We may be able to see something then.
     
    (Why do you appear to be changing your nick every time you post?)
     
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Friday, January 28, 2011 3:56 PM
    Moderator
  • Worse yet, what will they do if there turns out to be no real answer to this? The question may remain open until Windows 8 comes out with a fix - although given that the problem occurs in XP, Vista, and Windows 7, I wouldn't hold my breath.

    Suggestion to Microsoft: They should retire the error code 0x80070002 from usage and instead issue a message that 'this error code has been retired, so you cannot possibly be having this problem."


    retired systems engineer  (Murphy was right)
    Friday, January 28, 2011 4:01 PM
  • There is nothing obviously wrong with your report - it may be that you created it while the system was not actually showing the non-genuine flag, or it may be that the very act of creating the report clears the error, if it's as volatile as you suggest.

    The 80070002 messages are generic - and in most cases in htese reports can be read as meaning 'n/a'

    What they actually mean it File Not Found - but in the majority f cases in the report, it's becuase the operating system isn't the relevant one, or the software isn't installed. they do NOT mean that there are a large number of problems - and in fact in your case none of them mean anything significant.

     


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Friday, January 28, 2011 4:06 PM
    Moderator
  • This post MIGHT be the answer.  I will let you know after a day or two if the 'not genuine' message stays away.

    I suspected that the message might be getting issued because of some communication failure or blockage with Microsoft's validation servers.

    I ran the command "slmgr.vbs /dlv" for detailed license status information.  Then I tested ALL of the links provided in the result (which, by the way, said that my Windows was genuine and validated.)

    These were the links I tested by cutting and pasting the URLs into my browser:

    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88338
    Machine Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88339
    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88341
    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340

    AHA! The first 3 worked ok, but the last one did not have a certificate and was marked as untrusted!  I worked through the warnings and installed the certificate (Microsoft really SHOULD provide a certificate for this site that doesn't generate so many complaints about it's validity while being installed) and now all four links work without being blocked.  PERHAPS this will allow Windows to perform its frequent, periodic validity self-tests without complaining that it isn't genuine any more.

    I'll let you know later this weekend if the message quits reappearing.  It'll take a few days before I'll feel comfortable that the problem is fixed.

     


    retired systems engineer
    • Proposed as answer by Colly Friday, January 28, 2011 4:25 PM
    Friday, January 28, 2011 4:22 PM
  • This post MIGHT be the answer.  I will let you know after a day or two if the 'not genuine' message stays away.

    I suspected that the message might be getting issued because of some communication failure or blockage with Microsoft's validation servers.

    I ran the command "slmgr.vbs /dlv" for detailed license status information.  Then I tested ALL of the links provided in the result (which, by the way, said that my Windows was genuine and validated.)

    These were the links I tested by cutting and pasting the URLs into my browser:

    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88338
    Machine Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88339
    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88341
    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340

    AHA! The first 3 worked ok, but the last one did not have a certificate and was marked as untrusted!  I worked through the warnings and installed the certificate (Microsoft really SHOULD provide a certificate for this site that doesn't generate so many complaints about it's validity while being installed) and now all four links work without being blocked.  PERHAPS this will allow Windows to perform its frequent, periodic validity self-tests without complaining that it isn't genuine any more.

    I'll let you know later this weekend if the message quits reappearing.  It'll take a few days before I'll feel comfortable that the problem is fixed.

     


    retired systems engineer

    I doubt that that is the source of your problem - but I'd love to be proved wrong!
    FWIW, on my OEM machine, I get redirected to the MS search engine if I use that link from my report.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Friday, January 28, 2011 4:37 PM
    Moderator
  • FWIW, on my OEM machine, I get redirected to the MS search engine if I use that link from my report.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    If by 'that link" you mean www.micrsofot.genuine.validate , yup, it goes to my search engine too. They simply cannot read 'typoese'.  The transposed s and o and the missing .com and slashes kind of confused the browser as to where it was supposed to really go.  Computers are soooooo literal sometimes, one just has to maintain a sense of humor. Life is too short to sweat the small stuff, and in the end, it's really ALL small stuff.

    http://www.accuracyproject.org/odetospellchecker.html

    http://www.murphys-laws.com/murphy/murphy-computer.html

    :)

    Deep thoughts: Computers cause and maintain the job security for millions of tech support people.  And people first feared that computers would replace people in jobs.  Imagine that!


    retired systems engineer
    Friday, January 28, 2011 4:50 PM
  • FWIW, on my OEM machine, I get redirected to the MS search engine if I use that link from my report.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    If by 'that link" you mean www.micrsofot.genuine.validate , yup, it goes to my search engine too. 


    retired systems engineer


    No - I mean the certificates link - that's why I quoted that message :)

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Friday, January 28, 2011 4:58 PM
    Moderator
  • "Colly" wrote in message news:13a6eb05-8b83-45ab-af27-dd786218d693 ...
    FWIW, on my OEM machine, I get redirected to the MS search engine if I use that link from my report.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    If by 'that link" you mean www.micrsofot.genuine.validate , yup, it goes to my search engine too. 


    retired systems engineer

     


    No - I mean the certificates link - that's why I quoted that message :)

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    That is odd.  You shouldn't (be getting sent to the search engine.)

    When I cut & paste the (Product Key Certificate URL) link http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340 , it goes to a page that does something then changes the URL in the address bar to https://activation.sls.microsoft.com/slpkc/SLCertifyProduct.asmx and a displays the message:

    PkcService

    The following operations are supported. For a formal definition, please review the Service Description .

    ...  But on my machine, it didn't go there at first until after I resolved the certificate and untrusted status issues, so the PkcService, whatever that is, was likely getting blocked by my security not allowing untrusted external "https" connections without certificates - which is as things should be, if a PC is properly secured.

    About the properties page.  Yup, I finally realized it only ever shows a Product ID, not the Product Key. Belarc's Advisor shows everything and all the installed products' keys and IDs.

    About the nickname: I have both a Hotmail address and an MSN address and I forgot which one I'd logged into the forum with first time and had checked the other one's email more recently, so Windows Live remembered the last one I'd logged in with (checking email) and used that one.  It just happened I had a 50/50 chance of choosing the wrong Windows Live email (since I didn't remember which one I'd used to post the original question.  Colly or Colly Lord, it's still me.  :)

     

    If my not genuine message reappears, I will run the diagnostic while the message is showing and post it again.


    retired systems engineer
    Friday, January 28, 2011 7:32 PM
  • "Colly" wrote in message news:13a6eb05-8b83-45ab-af27-dd786218d693 ...
    FWIW, on my OEM machine, I get redirected to the MS search engine if I use that link from my report.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    If by 'that link" you mean www.micrsofot.genuine.validate , yup, it goes to my search engine too. 


    retired systems engineer

     


    No - I mean the certificates link - that's why I quoted that message :)

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    That is odd.  You shouldn't (be getting sent to the search engine.)

    When I cut & paste the (Product Key Certificate URL) link http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340 , it goes to a page that does something then changes the URL in the address bar to https://activation.sls.microsoft.com/slpkc/SLCertifyProduct.asmx and a displays the message:

    PkcService

    The following operations are supported. For a formal definition, please review the Service Description .

    ...  But on my machine, it didn't go there at first until after I resolved the certificate and untrusted status issues, so the PkcService, whatever that is, was likely getting blocked by my security not allowing untrusted external "https" connections without certificates - which is as things should be, if a PC is properly secured.

    About the properties page.  Yup, I finally realized it only ever shows a Product ID, not the Product Key. Belarc's Advisor shows everything and all the installed products' keys and IDs.

    About the nickname: I have both a Hotmail address and an MSN address and I forgot which one I'd logged into the forum with first time and had checked the other one's email more recently, so Windows Live remembered the last one I'd logged in with (checking email) and used that one.  It just happened I had a 50/50 chance of choosing the wrong Windows Live email (since I didn't remember which one I'd used to post the original question.  Colly or Colly Lord, it's still me.  :)

     

    If my not genuine message reappears, I will run the diagnostic while the message is showing and post it again.


    retired systems engineer

    It sounds as if you haven't been updating the Root Certificates - my system has always gone that way direct for the first three certificates, and thinking about it, I would expect the fourth to fail as it's
    the Product Key certificate which is probably vendor-specific in OEM_SLP keys, which mine is still using. Unfortunately I don't have an OEM_COA install anywhere handy to compare the output with (except in these groups - and I'd rather do it from the same machine as the link was generated from)
     
    Incidentally, your link resolves easily for me.
     
     
     
     
    .
     

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    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Friday, January 28, 2011 10:36 PM
    Moderator
  • Thank you.  I have now manually updated the root certificates using the information from article KB931125.

    So, in the end,

    - I have changed my product ID from the one that Geek Squad had installed on the PC to the one on the CoA label.

    --   (note: oddly, the 'change product key' link did NOT appear in my computer properties screen until AFTER I had accomplished this using command line instructions to change the product key.)

    - I have tested and installed missing certificate(s) for the URLs listed by the "slmgr.vbs /dlv" command.

    --  (note: error code 0x080070002 nowhere suggests that there might be a missing root certificate)

    - and I have manually updated the root certificates using the information from the knowledge base article KB931125.

    --  (note: who knows why Windows Update did not take care of this on its own?  Shouldn't it?  But then, how could it if it were perhaps missing the certificate it needed in order to accomplish the update? catch-22 )

    Here's hoping I never see the 'not genuine' message again.

    Thanks for helping figure this mess out.  :)

    - Colly

     

    ...and, no, I won't let the ba****rds grind me down  (from the Latin of Noel's signature)

     


    retired systems engineer
    • Proposed as answer by Colly Saturday, January 29, 2011 1:12 AM
    Saturday, January 29, 2011 1:12 AM
  • Thank you.  I have now manually updated the root certificates using the information from article KB931125.

    So, in the end,

    - I have changed my product ID from the one that Geek Squad had installed on the PC to the one on the CoA label.

    --   (note: oddly, the 'change product key' link did NOT appear in my computer properties screen until AFTER I had accomplished this using command line instructions to change the product key.)

    - I have tested and installed missing certificate(s) for the URLs listed by the "slmgr.vbs /dlv" command.

    --  (note: error code 0x080070002 nowhere suggests that there might be a missing root certificate)

    - and I have manually updated the root certificates using the information from the knowledge base article KB931125.

    --  (note: who knows why Windows Update did not take care of this on its own?  Shouldn't it?  But then, how could it if it were perhaps missing the certificate it needed in order to accomplish the update? catch-22 )

    Here's hoping I never see the 'not genuine' message again.

    Thanks for helping figure this mess out.  :)

    - Colly

     

    ...and, no, I won't let the ba****rds grind me down  (from the Latin of Noel's signature)

     


    retired systems engineer

    I've said before - the 80070002 messages are just 'file not found' messages, and ALL the ones in your report are perfectly standard for a Win7 report.
    MGADiag is designed to work in an offline system, and cannot therefore check anything outside what's installed on the computer - and certificates have to be checked online.
     
    The Root Certificates are (for reasons known only to MS) not considered 'Important', or 'Critical', and are not therefore offered through Automatic Updates. If you had gone to Windows Updates, you'd have seen them listed under 'Optional' updates.
     
    The fact that the Change Product Key link didn't appear in your Properties page until after you'd already updated it suggest that something in the licensing system was broken beforehand, and installing a new Key fixed the problem - which would indicate the fault was in the Licensing Store. It's a shame you never ran the MGADiag tool before the change - we might have some idea what could be causing he volatility.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Saturday, January 29, 2011 2:46 AM
    Moderator