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  • Question

  • This may be a silly question on Microsoft's own forum, but apart from the Self-Paced Training Kit what study materials would people recommend?
    Tuesday, December 14, 2010 2:56 AM

Answers

  • Much depends upon how you learn, and how well you have a grasp of the materials.  You can look into computer based training (CBT Nuggets, Trainsignal, or TestOut), or additional test questions from Transcender and such.

    FWIW, there is no "best" method to study.  It all depends upon your style of learning.  

    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Sunday, January 9, 2011 9:05 PM
    Tuesday, December 14, 2010 3:14 AM
    Answerer
  • Hi,

    You have certainly started at the right place by getting the training kit.

    I find the following helps a lot in all Microsoft exams I sit; -

    Focus on the practice exam test. I typically put it in custom mode, so I can take as long as I need to answer the questions. I start attempting the questions by referring to the course material. This helps me focus on revising on my weakest areas. After a while I find that I am able to attempt the practice exam test and complete it within the time it would take me to sit the real exam. I also found it very helpful to read the chapter summaries into my MP3 player whilst working through the course material, when I reached the practice exam stage I read the correct answers to questions which I previously answered incorrectly into my MP3 player. I then end up revising for my exam by listening to my MP3 player whilst in traffic, waiting in queues, etc.

    Most people who sit these exams tend to be quite time poor because they are already in full time work and they have a family to look after for example. Microsoft exams, particularly the MCTS variety tend to be about loading as much stuff into your memory as you can. I have also found that on the job experience is the best form of exam revision. This is to the extent that in some cases taking a cut in pay to gain a job which more accurately matches the content of the exam you are about to sit could prove to be financially prudent in the long term.

    I hope this helps,

    Kind Regards,

    Kieran.

     


    If you have found any of my posts helpful then please vote them as helpful. Kieran Wood MCTS BI, PGD SoftDev (Open), MBCS http://uk.linkedin.com/in/bileeds
    Tuesday, December 14, 2010 3:48 AM

All replies

  • Much depends upon how you learn, and how well you have a grasp of the materials.  You can look into computer based training (CBT Nuggets, Trainsignal, or TestOut), or additional test questions from Transcender and such.

    FWIW, there is no "best" method to study.  It all depends upon your style of learning.  

    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Sunday, January 9, 2011 9:05 PM
    Tuesday, December 14, 2010 3:14 AM
    Answerer
  • Hi,

    You have certainly started at the right place by getting the training kit.

    I find the following helps a lot in all Microsoft exams I sit; -

    Focus on the practice exam test. I typically put it in custom mode, so I can take as long as I need to answer the questions. I start attempting the questions by referring to the course material. This helps me focus on revising on my weakest areas. After a while I find that I am able to attempt the practice exam test and complete it within the time it would take me to sit the real exam. I also found it very helpful to read the chapter summaries into my MP3 player whilst working through the course material, when I reached the practice exam stage I read the correct answers to questions which I previously answered incorrectly into my MP3 player. I then end up revising for my exam by listening to my MP3 player whilst in traffic, waiting in queues, etc.

    Most people who sit these exams tend to be quite time poor because they are already in full time work and they have a family to look after for example. Microsoft exams, particularly the MCTS variety tend to be about loading as much stuff into your memory as you can. I have also found that on the job experience is the best form of exam revision. This is to the extent that in some cases taking a cut in pay to gain a job which more accurately matches the content of the exam you are about to sit could prove to be financially prudent in the long term.

    I hope this helps,

    Kind Regards,

    Kieran.

     


    If you have found any of my posts helpful then please vote them as helpful. Kieran Wood MCTS BI, PGD SoftDev (Open), MBCS http://uk.linkedin.com/in/bileeds
    Tuesday, December 14, 2010 3:48 AM