locked
How does WHS distribute data when there are multiple drives? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I use an add on for WHS that gives me stats on the drives that make up the storage pool.  It shows me their temp, and how much of them is used.
    One thing I noticed was that 2 of my IDE 250GB drives were up over 90% of usage and other drives were barely touched.  Since these were my oldest drives, I removed them in the console so they were forced to move their data over to other drives, and then added them back once that was done.
    For some reason it seems that WHS has selected my 1 TB drive and a 400 GB drive to dump all the data to, again, leaving about 5 of my hard drives with next to no data on them.
    Is there a logic behind how WHS duplicates the data?  Would it not make more sense to spread it out vs using just a couple hard drives until they are almost full?
    Thanks. 
    Monday, February 2, 2009 7:27 PM

Answers

  • The algorithm that windows Home Server uses to determine what drive(s) to store files on favors using a drive that already has files, as long as there is sufficient room for the new file. The theory is that this tends to cluster files which are logically related (i.e. in the same folder) together on drives. This is desirable (if you agree with the theory) because it makes figuring out what files need to be replaced/restored easier. Instead of, for example, needing to replace a few media files each from a thousand CDs, you might need to replace all files from 100 CDs.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, February 2, 2009 9:04 PM
    Moderator
  • There is a lower limit on free space on a drive, yes. I think it's 10 GB, but could be wrong about that...
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, February 2, 2009 10:45 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • The algorithm that windows Home Server uses to determine what drive(s) to store files on favors using a drive that already has files, as long as there is sufficient room for the new file. The theory is that this tends to cluster files which are logically related (i.e. in the same folder) together on drives. This is desirable (if you agree with the theory) because it makes figuring out what files need to be replaced/restored easier. Instead of, for example, needing to replace a few media files each from a thousand CDs, you might need to replace all files from 100 CDs.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, February 2, 2009 9:04 PM
    Moderator
  • That makes sense Ken, my only problem is that it uses drives up over the 90% full which doesn't give me a warm fuzzy.
    I'm curious as to whether it would fill it to the limit if given the chance or at what point it goes to another drive.
    Monday, February 2, 2009 10:24 PM
  • There is a lower limit on free space on a drive, yes. I think it's 10 GB, but could be wrong about that...
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, February 2, 2009 10:45 PM
    Moderator