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Windows XP Issues / Invalid RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello, i bought an emachines back in 2005 with a version of Windows XP Home Edition. Eventually around '08 the mother board broke so i bought a new one and ever since then my version of XP is now invalid? Which i dont understand how i bought it back in 2005 now that its with a new mother board its invalid? It is still on the original hard drive that i had used with my emachines.

    Now very, very soon as in today my XP has one day to validate. I really do not want to pay $90 to buy something i have already purchased just because Microsoft say all the sudden its invalid because a piece of my computer broke. So can anyone help me to get my version working again, theres no reason i should have to buy this again.

    Thanks.
    Thursday, February 18, 2010 5:19 PM

Answers

  • To help us analyze and troubleshoot a non-genuine notification issue you may be experiencing, please download and run the Microsoft Genuine Advantage Diagnostics Tool

    Once you run the tool, click on the Continue button, then click on the Copy button and paste the report into your post, along with your question. 

    Thank you!


    Carey Frisch
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, February 25, 2010 10:44 PM
    Thursday, February 18, 2010 10:45 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • To help us analyze and troubleshoot a non-genuine notification issue you may be experiencing, please download and run the Microsoft Genuine Advantage Diagnostics Tool

    Once you run the tool, click on the Continue button, then click on the Copy button and paste the report into your post, along with your question. 

    Thank you!


    Carey Frisch
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, February 25, 2010 10:44 PM
    Thursday, February 18, 2010 10:45 PM
    Moderator
  • No reply from original poster.

    Closing thread as Answered

    Darin MS
    Thursday, February 25, 2010 10:43 PM
  • Hello, i bought an emachines back in 2005 with a version of Windows XP Home Edition. Eventually around '08 the mother board broke so i bought a new one and ever since then my version of XP is now invalid? Which i dont understand how i bought it back in 2005 now that its with a new mother board its invalid? It is still on the original hard drive that i had used with my emachines.

    Now very, very soon as in today my XP has one day to validate. I really do not want to pay $90 to buy something i have already purchased just because Microsoft say all the sudden its invalid because a piece of my computer broke. So can anyone help me to get my version working again, theres no reason i should have to buy this again.

    Thanks.

    Saturday, August 7, 2010 1:11 PM
  • "iftikhar147" wrote in message news:79f347d9-9359-4f08-b851-dcf386d37e8f...
    Hello, i bought an emachines back in 2005 with a version of Windows XP Home Edition. Eventually around '08 the mother board broke so i bought a new one and ever since then my version of XP is now invalid? Which i dont understand how i bought it back in 2005 now that its with a new mother board its invalid? It is still on the original hard drive that i had used with my emachines.

    Now very, very soon as in today my XP has one day to validate. I really do not want to pay $90 to buy something i have already purchased just because Microsoft say all the sudden its invalid because a piece of my computer broke. So can anyone help me to get my version working again, theres no reason i should have to buy this again.

    Thanks.


    OEM Licenses are locked to the machine on which they are first installed - when the machine dies, so does the license. Changing the motherboard invalidates the license, unless it's done by the manufacturer under warranty.
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, August 8, 2010 8:42 AM
    Moderator
  • OEM Licenses are locked to the machine on which they are first installed - when the machine dies, so does the license. Changing the motherboard invalidates the license, unless it's done by the manufacturer under warranty.

     

    Noel,

    that is incorrect. I have seen these claims before many times and became curious. Each Microsoft product includes an EULA -- End User License Agreement -- that document is a legal contract between the end user and Microsoft. It spells out the exact terms under which you can use the software and enumerates the rights and responsibilities you have as well as those on Microsoft's part. Essentially it is the contract between yourself and Microsoft for the software you purchased. Why do I bring this up and explain it? Because it's a legal contract, it spells out all the terms of the agreement with Microsoft. If you or Microsoft had a dispute and decided to use the legal system to resolve said dispute it would all go back to the EULA on what is stated and what is not.

     

    Nowhere in any Microsoft OEM EULA is the word "motherboard" mentioned, or is any other would that could be construed to mean the same. The same applies to any other word that could refer to any other part inside your computer. In fact there is absolutely no reference to any internal computer component in the EULA.  All the EULA states is that you can not transfer an OEM copy of Windows between computers. Repairing a broken computer does not require that you buy another copy of Windows. It doesn't "invalidate"  anything. If befumo's computer broke and the motherboard was replaced, he then has 1 working computer and 1 motherboard (a.ka. a broken pile of parts). How can you possibly have transfered a copy of Windows from a computer to a broken pile of parts? That is impossible.

     

    Warmest regards,

     

    Andreas Helge

     

    befumo.

     

    I see it all the time. The Socket 478 Intel motherboards in the eMachines and Gateway are known to die. I've fixed many systems myself infact I was surprised to find in 2010 socket 478 motherboards on store shelves! But anyways what is going on is when eMachines builds a computer they do what is called SLP (system locked preinstallation) activation. When eMachines sells a computer that is going to be bundled with a Windows license, they include special information in the BIOS which identifies it as such. This BIOS string, a special Windows CD Key (Which is used for all installations, e.g all eMachines with Windows XP Home have the same CD key if you use a key finder program) and some digital certificates are used in this scheme. Basically if all 3 items I mentioned match Windows does not need to do online or phone activation to be genuine. That is why when you had the original motherboard and you used the eMachines restore disc you could use it without any activation.

     

    Since you replaced the broken motherboard with one that was not from eMachines you broke the OEM SLP activation. Since the BIOS no longer matches the key is no longer valid on your computer (the one that every other eMachines computer came with.)

     

    All you need to do to remedy this situation is follow the prompts for online activation. You will recieve a message similar to "this key is not valid for activation" and it will prompt you to enter a new key. Simply enter the key on the side of your computer and continue the activation. If it continues to say that is is not valid for activation, then you need to phone in. Don't be alarmed this is because the SLP scheme I described you generally don't need to use the "real"  cd key which is the one on the sticker on the side/back of your PC. Due to this, Microsoft has disabled these keys for online activation so you just need to call in, tell them what happened (my pc broke and I changed the broken parts) and they will activate it for you without a hassle.

     

    All the best,

     

    Andreas

    Saturday, August 14, 2010 5:31 AM