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Any suggestion on installing WHS on 40GB HDD RRS feed

  • Question

  • I know that the requirement for the system disk is larger than 80GB which is true before pp1 where the DATA partition of the ysstem disk is for landing zone. Now the landing zone is gone, why it is still forced to have system disk be larger than 80GB?

    I would like to use my 40GB SSD HDD for system disk for less possibility of failing. In my experience, it is much harder to replace system disk in case that the data disk can't be recognized at server re-install time.

    Is there anyway I can use my 40GB HDD as system disk?   
    • Edited by Dcdyd Friday, May 22, 2009 2:12 PM
    Friday, May 22, 2009 2:12 PM

Answers

  • No, there is no way to use a disk smaller than about 65-70 (I don't recall the hard limit; it's been a while) GB as the system disk when you install Windows Home Server. The stated requirement is still for an 80 GB disk, which will really be approximately 74 gigabytes in size.

    It would probably be possible to install on a larger disk, then use a tool such as Ghost or Acronis TrueImage to move that to a smaller disk. It's not supported, and I don't recommend it, as I don't know what it would do to Windows Home Server. I don't think it's desirable anyway; Windows Home Server does use the system disk for more than just a landing zone.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Proposed as answer by Ken WarrenModerator Friday, May 22, 2009 3:05 PM
    • Marked as answer by Dcdyd Friday, May 22, 2009 7:46 PM
    Friday, May 22, 2009 3:05 PM
    Moderator
  • Yes. However, regarding the first part, the 54 GB that's left after creating the system partition on a minimum sized disk is still enough for about 13 million files. 

    As for the second part, it's absolutely true, though updates to Windows Home Server have changed how free space is presented to client computers. Now, total free space in the storage pool is presented rather than just free space on the system disk.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Dcdyd Friday, May 22, 2009 7:46 PM
    Friday, May 22, 2009 7:20 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • No, there is no way to use a disk smaller than about 65-70 (I don't recall the hard limit; it's been a while) GB as the system disk when you install Windows Home Server. The stated requirement is still for an 80 GB disk, which will really be approximately 74 gigabytes in size.

    It would probably be possible to install on a larger disk, then use a tool such as Ghost or Acronis TrueImage to move that to a smaller disk. It's not supported, and I don't recommend it, as I don't know what it would do to Windows Home Server. I don't think it's desirable anyway; Windows Home Server does use the system disk for more than just a landing zone.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Proposed as answer by Ken WarrenModerator Friday, May 22, 2009 3:05 PM
    • Marked as answer by Dcdyd Friday, May 22, 2009 7:46 PM
    Friday, May 22, 2009 3:05 PM
    Moderator
  • Does WHS put PC backups in the rest of the system disk or does it use two data hdds?

    Friday, May 22, 2009 3:36 PM
  • The answer to your question is "it depends". Windows Home Server won't use the system disk unless it has to for storage of backups, files in your shares, etc. But the tombstones that DE uses to keep track of files in the storage pool always live on the system disk, and if your other disks fill up it will eventually use the system disk for files as well.

    You should take a look at the documentation on the Windows Home Server Support page and the Drive Extender technical brief in particular.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, May 22, 2009 3:49 PM
    Moderator
  • The answer to your question is "it depends". Windows Home Server won't use the system disk unless it has to for storage of backups, files in your shares, etc.

    to complete, what Ken said, this will only be true, if you have installed at least Power Pack 1 before moving data to your Home Server.
    (And you will need at least two additional disks for the data, so that duplicated folders can be written to a second disk.)
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Friday, May 22, 2009 6:19 PM
    Moderator
  • THanks for the advice. Is below statement still true.


    The primary data partition in a home server should be as large as possible for two reasons: 

    ·         You want to provide sufficient space to grow the file table for all of the files that you will store on your home server.

    ·         Windows Vista® and other home computer operating systems check to see if there is adequate space on the primary data partition prior to starting a copy operation.

     

    Friday, May 22, 2009 6:35 PM
  • Yes. However, regarding the first part, the 54 GB that's left after creating the system partition on a minimum sized disk is still enough for about 13 million files. 

    As for the second part, it's absolutely true, though updates to Windows Home Server have changed how free space is presented to client computers. Now, total free space in the storage pool is presented rather than just free space on the system disk.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Dcdyd Friday, May 22, 2009 7:46 PM
    Friday, May 22, 2009 7:20 PM
    Moderator
  • Thank you very much for the answer, Ken.
    It is very helpful.
    Friday, May 22, 2009 7:48 PM