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WHS Shuts Down Due To License Violation RRS feed

  • Question

  • Recently, while attempting to resolve my inability to get the WHS Connector function/feature to log on to my installation of WHS .. and just generally peaking around under the hood ... I enabled the License Logging service and joined the WHS system to a Domain.

    Shortly after doing so, I began having my WHS system unexpectedly logging me off and shutting itself down after about 1-2hrs, approximate.

    Naturally, PD was in order.

    While looking to eliminate HW or possible spware/trojan infection etc as the possible cause I eventually came to the conclusion that it was either:

    A) The enabling of License Logging or (clue was in the Event Log pointing to EULA violations)

    B)  The joining to the Domain triggered some sort of EULA violation response in WHS

     

    So, I disabled License Logging .... and after several reboots after 'unexpected shutdowns' I decided to re-install (repair) the WHS setup. Was also hoping to resolve another issue with the re-installation (Unable to get WHS Connector to function - still getting either Invalid Password or Network Problem ... depending on what configuration changes I make to the setup)

    So far, since the re-installation - License Logging disabled and not joined to any Domain) WHS appears to be stable once more.

    Sooner or later I'm going to rejoin my WHS to the Domain (without License Logging enabled) to see if joining a Domain played any part in the EULA violation messages.

    Question: any similar experience(s) regarding the EULA and WHS?

     

    Saturday, May 19, 2007 11:05 PM

Answers

  • Simon, WHS is built on top of Windows Server 2003 for SBS. Joining it to a domain, unless it's the PDC, is a violation of the EULA. The only way you can have it participate in a domain is if it is the primary domain controller, and promoting it to PDC could break the WHS security model in some pretty basic ways. It's also (per this post by Charlie Kindel) an unsupported scenario.

    So you will be unable to join it to a domain (with or without License Logging Service enabled) unless you make it your PDC, which opens it's own can of worms.
    Saturday, May 19, 2007 11:58 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Simon, WHS is built on top of Windows Server 2003 for SBS. Joining it to a domain, unless it's the PDC, is a violation of the EULA. The only way you can have it participate in a domain is if it is the primary domain controller, and promoting it to PDC could break the WHS security model in some pretty basic ways. It's also (per this post by Charlie Kindel) an unsupported scenario.

    So you will be unable to join it to a domain (with or without License Logging Service enabled) unless you make it your PDC, which opens it's own can of worms.
    Saturday, May 19, 2007 11:58 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Ken!

     

    That was quick! Thanks for the answer ... saves me having to re-install (or restore .. now that I've done an MSbackup of the current config) again!

    Would I be close in assuming that  it's part of the reason why I can't get the WHS Console to connect (Cannot Connect To Your Home Server. Check Your Network Connection ..... ) even though I'm connected and working on the WHS system via an RDP session?

    Sunday, May 20, 2007 12:24 AM
  • would changing the name of the default domain to one I currently use onj my network also be the explanation for why my WHS installation just shuts itself off (machine is on) but WHS becomes unresponsive and all icons on the clients go grey?
    Saturday, June 30, 2007 3:12 PM
  • It's a strong possibillity - using the domain name for the workgroup effectively adds it to the domain. I've left my WHS in the default "workgroup" workgroup and it co-exists fine along side my domain.

     

    I thought it might be a pain because it's outside the domain, but in fact it's fine - Vista sees it fine and with uPnP detection enabled on my XP MCE the WHS appears in the local network group (though in practice I don't use it, just the shortcuts on the desktop or the system tray icon).

    Sunday, July 1, 2007 12:17 AM
  •  Crash2975 wrote:

    It's a strong possibillity - using the domain name for the workgroup effectively adds it to the domain. I've left my WHS in the default "workgroup" workgroup and it co-exists fine along the workgroup.

    I thought it might be a pain because it's outside the domain, but in fact it's fine - Vista sees it fine and with uPnP detection enabled on my XP MCE the WHS appears in the local network group (though in practice I don't use it, just the shortcuts on the desktop or the system tray icon).



    Same here as Crash said, I run a domain for my local lan, I just put the WHS within the lan subnet (or you can use deferent subnet and make it trusted within your domain if you like).

    Everything working as it should, and the WHS on "workgroup" workgroup.

    My best.
    Sunday, July 1, 2007 12:31 AM
  • Good to hear it's working for you too. I think it's better if WHS is in the same subnet, as I think otherwise it would introduce unnecessary problems.
    Sunday, July 1, 2007 12:41 AM
  •  Crash2975 wrote:
    Good to hear it's working for you too. I think it's better if WHS is in the same subnet, as I think otherwise it would introduce unnecessary problems.


    Totally agree.

    My best.
    Sunday, July 1, 2007 12:44 AM
  • By default, WHS only accepts clients that are on the same subnet as the server itself. If you have multiple subnets in your house you would have to mess with the firewall settings to change that behavior.
    Sunday, July 1, 2007 5:00 AM
    Moderator