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CRM 2011 storage capacity planning / sizing RRS feed

  • Question

  • How much database storage space does a fresh install of CRM 2011 take?

    If I have 1,000,000 contacts and 20,000 groups and 300 Users in my CRM 2011 system, how much storage space in CRM database will it take?  With maybe a few custom fields on entities and a few workflows.

    Then, for every campaign we do (every contact receives either an electronic communication (we store the URL to the email) or a hardcopy letter (we store template and data), approximately how much additional storage space can we expect CRM to use?

    (Lastly, there's this 'Storage and SQL Server capacity planning and configuration (SharePoint Server 2010)' on technet and a SharePoint 2010 Sizer application from HP.  Is there anything similar for CRM (from Microsoft)?)


    Tuesday, August 9, 2011 8:07 PM

Answers

  • Thanks Brian, it's definitely something that the MVPs would like the CRM community to add to on the CRM wiki on TechNet. I'll see what I can do in between projects with regards to database sizing.

    Neil Benson, CRM Addict and MVP at Customery Ltd. You can reach me on LinkedIn or Twitter. Join over 10,000 other CRM professionals on the Microsoft Dynamics CRM group on LinkedIn.

    • Marked as answer by Jim Glass Jr Friday, August 12, 2011 6:32 PM
    Thursday, August 11, 2011 8:07 PM
    Moderator
  • As Neil says, it's the ancilliary data, rather than the main entities, that can have the biggest effect, with tracked emails and their attachments typically causing the greatest growth. From my experience, heavy CRM users (i.e. who use it as their main business application every day, and track all relevant email) can generate up to 1GB of data per user per year. Users who don't create activities or track emails, but just edit the occasional record, generate hardly any data (unless you have heavy auditing).

    So again, it depends, but the time factor is important, as data accumulates broadly linearly over time, so your database may be 100 Gb after one year, but 200 GB after another year with the same user base


    Microsoft CRM MVP - http://mscrmuk.blogspot.com  http://www.excitation.co.uk
     
    • Marked as answer by Jim Glass Jr Friday, August 12, 2011 6:32 PM
    Friday, August 12, 2011 5:14 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi Brian, unfortunately there is no guidance available from Microsoft. In real life, given the parameters you have mentioned, no one would be able to accurately estimate the size of the database. The database size will be affected by a lot of factors that you haven't mentioned -- e.g. auditing, activities, attachments, workflows, etc.

    I'd estimate that your database could be somewhere between 1GB and 100GB -- I know that's not much use, but that's my point -- it's really difficult to provide any kind of accurate estimate.


    Neil Benson, CRM Addict and MVP at Customery Ltd. You can reach me on LinkedIn or Twitter. Join over 10,000 other CRM professionals on the Microsoft Dynamics CRM group on LinkedIn.

    Thursday, August 11, 2011 12:36 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks, Neil.

    SharePoint 2010 has some guidance in this area.  It would be nice for the CRM 2011 team to take a stab at something similar, too.

    Thursday, August 11, 2011 6:57 PM
  • Thanks Brian, it's definitely something that the MVPs would like the CRM community to add to on the CRM wiki on TechNet. I'll see what I can do in between projects with regards to database sizing.

    Neil Benson, CRM Addict and MVP at Customery Ltd. You can reach me on LinkedIn or Twitter. Join over 10,000 other CRM professionals on the Microsoft Dynamics CRM group on LinkedIn.

    • Marked as answer by Jim Glass Jr Friday, August 12, 2011 6:32 PM
    Thursday, August 11, 2011 8:07 PM
    Moderator
  • As Neil says, it's the ancilliary data, rather than the main entities, that can have the biggest effect, with tracked emails and their attachments typically causing the greatest growth. From my experience, heavy CRM users (i.e. who use it as their main business application every day, and track all relevant email) can generate up to 1GB of data per user per year. Users who don't create activities or track emails, but just edit the occasional record, generate hardly any data (unless you have heavy auditing).

    So again, it depends, but the time factor is important, as data accumulates broadly linearly over time, so your database may be 100 Gb after one year, but 200 GB after another year with the same user base


    Microsoft CRM MVP - http://mscrmuk.blogspot.com  http://www.excitation.co.uk
     
    • Marked as answer by Jim Glass Jr Friday, August 12, 2011 6:32 PM
    Friday, August 12, 2011 5:14 AM
    Moderator