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Put WHS to sleep or keep it on - what is best for long term reliability? RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • What are the opinions on keeping a WHS running all the time vs letting it go to sleep if the goal is long term reliability?  From a usage perspective, I can put my WHS to sleep for about 12 hours a day and then keep it on when I am home and during part of the night as it does the daily backups, and other scheduled maintenance.  So my question is not a usage question or a philosophical question about how one should use a WHS, but more specifically thoughts on having electronic components power up and down every day vs just staying on.

    Also, a related question, if I leave it on, do the drives automatically spin down after a period of time?
    • Changed type kariya21Moderator Wednesday, January 6, 2010 3:50 AM not a technical question
    Wednesday, January 6, 2010 3:35 AM

All replies

  • What are the opinions on keeping a WHS running all the time vs letting it go to sleep if the goal is long term reliability?

    I personally leave mine on 24/7.  It's been running non-stop since September 2007.  However, I will say that I bought all new parts when I built mine since it was my intention to leave it on all the time and I didn't want to risk any type of failure due to old parts failing in the short term.

    From a usage perspective, I can put my WHS to sleep for about 12 hours a day and then keep it on when I am home and during part of the night as it does the daily backups, and other scheduled maintenance.  So my question is not a usage question or a philosophical question about how one should use a WHS, but more specifically thoughts on having electronic components power up and down every day vs just staying on.

    Also, a related question, if I leave it on, do the drives automatically spin down after a period of time?
    No.
    Wednesday, January 6, 2010 3:53 AM
    Moderator
  • I'm a 24/7 (my whole LAN, not just WHS) person too...

    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -- Thomas Paine
    Wednesday, January 6, 2010 7:24 AM
  • I use Lights Out to power off the server in times, in which I do not need it usually (night hours) to save some power.
    Less running means less heat to components, therefore they could last longer if they are sensitive to heat.
    Moving parts like cooler fans will accumulate dust and degrade over time while running, so for those it is definitively better to be shut off.
    Consumer grade disks are also not always specified to run 24/7 and therefore could fail earlier, on the other side I have seen server disks fail after a necessary power down.
    So it is more mentality than technical background and the fact, that taking the server down in unused times may save costs for electricity and is the better way from environmental point of view.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Wednesday, January 6, 2010 8:06 AM
    Moderator
  • Not sure if it is supported, but I've used Power Options in Control Panel to turn off hard drives after 10 minutes.  The only drawback is that it sometimes takes a few extra seconds for the drives to spin up when accessed from client computer Shared Folders Icon or the WHS Console.  Other than that, no ill effects noted.  My UPS software indicates about 110 watts at idle with all six drives spinning, with it dropping down to about 60 watts when idle and the drives spun down.  After another few minutes, it drops to around 49 watts.  Not quite sure where the other 11 watts is coming from, but it may be my AMD 3800 x2 25 watt model, dropping into power saving mode.  About the only time I completely power off the WHS is for the semi annual dust bunny cleaning or hardware replacement/maintenance.

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    BullDawg
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    "Olaf Engelke" <=?utf-8?B?T2xhZiBFbmdlbGtl?=> wrote in message news:34d43037-9524-44b d-a7af-064817f3ac79...
    I use Lights Out to power off the server in times, in which I do not need it usually (night hours) to save some power.
    Less running means less heat to components, therefore they could last longer if they are sensitive to heat.
    Moving parts like cooler fans will accumulate dust and degrade over time while running, so for those it is definitively better to be shut off.
    Consumer grade disks are also not always specified to run 24/7 and therefore could fail earlier, on the other side I have seen server disks fail after a necessary power down.
    So it is more mentality than technical background and the fact, that taking the server down in unused times may save costs for electricity and is the better way from environmental point of view.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    BullDawg
    Wednesday, January 6, 2010 11:15 AM
  • Not sure if it is supported, but I've used Power Options in Control Panel to turn off hard drives after 10 minutes.

    No, it's not supported (since it requires logging into the server desktop).

    The only drawback is that it sometimes takes a few extra seconds for the drives to spin up when accessed from client computer Shared Folders Icon or the WHS Console.  Other than that, no ill effects noted.  My UPS software indicates about 110 watts at idle with all six drives spinning, with it dropping down to about 60 watts when idle and the drives spun down.  After another few minutes, it drops to around 49 watts.  Not quite sure where the other 11 watts is coming from, but it may be my AMD 3800 x2 25 watt model, dropping into power saving mode.  About the only time I completely power off the WHS is for the semi annual dust bunny cleaning or hardware replacement/maintenance.

    --
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    BullDawg
    Associate Expert
    In God We Trust
    ______________
     
    Thursday, January 7, 2010 12:31 AM
    Moderator
  • No, it's not supported (since it requires logging into the server desktop).

    Unsupported doesn't mean it won't work.

    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -- Thomas Paine
    Thursday, January 7, 2010 1:08 AM
  • Unsupported doesn't mean it won't work. 
    True, but not only is it unsupported, it can cause problems with Windows Home Server. If a drive takes too long to spin back up (admittedly rare these days), it may drop out of the storage pool, which is it's own special learning experience for those who like to experiment.

    I highly recommend experimenting only with data you don't really care about, however...


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, January 7, 2010 3:26 AM
    Moderator
  • True, but not only is it unsupported, it can cause problems with Windows Home Server. If a drive takes too long to spin back up (admittedly rare these days), it may drop out of the storage pool, which is it's own special learning experience for those who like to experiment.

    I highly recommend experimenting only with data you don't really care about, however...
    I agree, more accurately; unsupported doesn't always mean not possible. Unsupported things may or may not work, some are just not tested, some will break WHS.

    I prefer not to spin down drives in any servers, personally, and WHS storage is pretty unique. Most WHS implementations don't use a lot of power while idle anyway.

    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -- Thomas Paine
    Thursday, January 7, 2010 6:34 AM
  • I don't log into the server, I use an Add-in called Program Launcher that launches Control Panel from the WHS Console.
     

    --
    ______________
    BullDawg
    Associate Expert
    In God We Trust
    ______________
     
    "kariya21" <=?utf-8?B?a2FyaXlhMjE=?=> wrote in message news:65725ba4-5dab-4e8 a-8650-96390ef56601...
    Not sure if it is supported, but I've used Power Options in Control Panel to turn off hard drives after 10 minutes.

    No, it's not supported (since it requires logging into the server desktop).

    The only drawback is that it sometimes takes a few extra seconds for the drives to spin up when accessed from client computer Shared Folders Icon or the WHS Console.  Other than that, no ill effects noted.  My UPS software indicates about 110 watts at idle with all six drives spinning, with it dropping down to about 60 watts when idle and the drives spun down.  After another few minutes, it drops to around 49 watts.  Not quite sure where the other 11 watts is coming from, but it may be my AMD 3800 x2 25 watt model, dropping into power saving mode.  About the only time I completely power off the WHS is for the semi annual dust bunny cleaning or hardware replacement/maintenance.

    --
    ______________
    BullDawg
    Associate Expert
    In God We Trust
    ______________
     
    < /HTML>
    BullDawg
    Thursday, January 7, 2010 12:50 PM