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how to replace Primary OS disk without losing data stored on it? RRS feed

  • Question

  • First, let me make sure I understand what I'm asking. I've read a ton from this forum as well as others, so I may have my information wrong.
    The thread here helps me understand what I think I need to do: http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/whssoftware/thread/d2361600-a4d6-4b9b-ac72-91d62d8ed71e

    From that thread, I understand:
    • If your primary drive dies, replace it with another and insert the install DVD. You SHOULD get the Reinstallation option. If so, select that and come back in a few days after it has finished rebuilding the tombstones. After that, all your additional drives (and the data contained on them) should be exactly as you left them, still part of the storage pool.
    • If you DO NOT get the Reinstallation option...you're basically screwed. You'll have to perform a new installation, but this will wipe all connected drives. You'll need to pull your additional drives and search through them yourself to find all your data.

    Do I have this correct? If so, here is my situation:

    My Primary OS disk is 500GB. I was in the process of moving a lot of data over to my WHS box, and my storage pool was starting to get full. As a result, WHS started to fill up the Primary disk with my data. This makes sense.

    Later, I added another drive. I expected it to move all the data it left on the Primary disk to the new drive I added. It has not.

    Now, my Primary drive is showing signs of early failure (loud clicks every so often). I do not trust it. I want to replace it with another drive and perform the Reinstallation option from the DVD.

    Before I do that, I need to know: How do I move the data that lives on the Primary drive off to my storage pool?

    Thanks,
    Aaron
     

    Sunday, February 21, 2010 10:48 PM

Answers

  • So here's how I look at your question:

    When you have a server that has multiple drives in the storage pool, you have a choice as to whether or not to turn duplication on for individual shares. If you choose not to turn it on for one or more shares, you are choosing to allow for the possibility that you will lose data if a drive (any drive, system or secondary) in your server fails. That's where you are this instant; if that system drive fails overnight, you're going to lose data no matter what you do tomorrow. If you have any data (media, business records, family photos, whatever) in shares that aren't duplicated today that's so valuable that you don't want to lose it, go buy a couple of 2 TB drives and beef up your storage pool until you can turn on duplication for those shares. This really is a "no brainer" for me: I want the data preserved, I turn on duplication; I don't care (I can recreate/recover easily from other sources), I turn it off.

    So the question is really "How do I feel about losing some of my Videos share?" I'll let you answer it. :)

    That said, yes, you can see what's on the drive and recover it after the fact, since it's not dead yet. My recommendation: go through a server recovery/reinstallation on a new system drive first, then just copy anything you see on the old drive in D:\DE\Shares\etc. (the DE folder is a hidden folder) to your shares again. Note: don't connect the old system drive to the new server; Bad Things™ will happen.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, February 22, 2010 1:34 AM
    Moderator
  • For anybody who finds themself in this same boat without a paddle, follow Olaf's advice here:


    • Go to the section that talks about if the server reinstall fails. I followed that process, and opted to leave all the drives mounted in the server, just disconnected until I completed a full, fresh installation. I had one drive already empty (in addition to the system drive), so I left that one connected.
    • Next, make sure to go through all the updates first. I just ran them from the Windows Update website, seemed faster.
    • Then, reconnect your drives with data on them., navigate to their driveletter:\DE\Shares and copy your data to \\servername\sharename. 
    • I found Teracopy to be very helpful in the manual copying process. It also gives the warm fuzzy with the CRC.
    • On my dying drive that I disconnected, I just connect to my workstation via USB and copied everything across the network, same method.

    Took me 2 weeks worth of evenings to get all this completed. Hopefully MS will include a system drive backup/restore process that works in the next version.
    • Marked as answer by saaron34 Friday, March 5, 2010 1:18 AM
    Friday, March 5, 2010 1:17 AM

All replies

  • There's no supported way to manipulate the drives Windows Home Server uses for data storage, so you can't force data off the system drive. So instead, add enough storage to your storage pool to allow you to turn duplication on for all of your shares. Then do so. Wait (a day or two if you've got huge volumes of unduplicated data today), and then replace your system drive. This FAQ details the risks to your data in the event of a drive failure, and replacing the system drive is effectively a "system drive failure".
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Sunday, February 21, 2010 11:06 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for the reply. That is an option.

    However, is there a way I can see what files exist on this drive? Then, is there a way I can copy just those files?

    Reason I ask is, if I turn on duplication for the Videos folder, I definitely won't have enough storage to account for it all. 
    Monday, February 22, 2010 12:28 AM
  • So here's how I look at your question:

    When you have a server that has multiple drives in the storage pool, you have a choice as to whether or not to turn duplication on for individual shares. If you choose not to turn it on for one or more shares, you are choosing to allow for the possibility that you will lose data if a drive (any drive, system or secondary) in your server fails. That's where you are this instant; if that system drive fails overnight, you're going to lose data no matter what you do tomorrow. If you have any data (media, business records, family photos, whatever) in shares that aren't duplicated today that's so valuable that you don't want to lose it, go buy a couple of 2 TB drives and beef up your storage pool until you can turn on duplication for those shares. This really is a "no brainer" for me: I want the data preserved, I turn on duplication; I don't care (I can recreate/recover easily from other sources), I turn it off.

    So the question is really "How do I feel about losing some of my Videos share?" I'll let you answer it. :)

    That said, yes, you can see what's on the drive and recover it after the fact, since it's not dead yet. My recommendation: go through a server recovery/reinstallation on a new system drive first, then just copy anything you see on the old drive in D:\DE\Shares\etc. (the DE folder is a hidden folder) to your shares again. Note: don't connect the old system drive to the new server; Bad Things™ will happen.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, February 22, 2010 1:34 AM
    Moderator
  • Excellent, you have answered my question. Thanks a lot.

    I turn duplication on for the data that I care about (photos, docs, other original content), but I leave it off for the things that can be re-acquired through other means. If a drive fails, then so be it. However, there is no sense in letting that happen in this situation, since all I am trying to do is wrangle the data to where it is supposed to be in the first place (ie, not on my system drive).

    Throwing a ton of storage at the problem doesn't seem like the answer either, just because MS couldn't include some sort of method to evacuate or backup the primary drive. If the Remove option wasn't grayed out, that would do exactly what I need. I suspect that would be a great feature for other users as well.

    From your recommendation, I will remove the failing drive and install a spare 500GB. I'll perform a Reinstallation and hope that goes well. I'll connect the old drive to my workstation and copy all the files from the d:\de\shares folder back over the network to WHS.

    Thanks again,
    Aaron
    Monday, February 22, 2010 3:27 AM
  • You can't remove the system drive from the storage pool because you must always have one drive in the storage pool, and in a single drive server the only drive available is the system drive. It's also where Windows Home Server performs the Drive Extender magic. So it's doubly "special" and can't be removed.

    You should read the FAQ I linked above if you haven't; it details your data loss risks...

    And regarding media: I have (at last count) slightly over 39,000 Apple Lossless tracks. That represents (in round numbers) 2,000 CDs and nearly 800 GB of media files. There's no way I ever want to rip all those CDs again; realistically it would be years before I got back to where I am today. So of course I have duplication turned on for everything. I also take a backup of my shares off-site every Monday I'm home to protect from fire, flood, falling trees crushing my house (I have 80'-100' oaks and maples all around the house), etc.

    My advice: buy big disks. :)
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, February 22, 2010 4:04 AM
    Moderator
  • I read the FAQ you linked to. It was helpful.

    I am aware of how data loss works. My issue is that WHS takes away a lot of the control I am used to having with server and desktop OS (which oddly is also one of it's strengths). As has been mentioned by others, WHS is apparently not for people who want control over where their data lives. That's a conversation for a different thread, however.

    I followed the process you suggested (pull dying drive, add a replacement, perform Server Restore) All was going well until I got this error: Installing Windows Home Server failed: The request is not supported. (error code: 0x80070032). It did this right at the stage where it says: Recovering Data. 


    I assume WHS has no built in method to wipe the drive it is going to be installing to?

    So I will try connecting the drive to another machine, destroying the existing partition, and trying the whole mess over again.

    God help regular users...

    Thanks for your continued support!

    Tuesday, February 23, 2010 4:42 AM
  • Not that it helps you much now, but there is an unsupported way to move data off the system drive.
    The Drive Balancer utility
    Tuesday, February 23, 2010 11:50 PM
  • I actually tried the Drive Balancer utility. It did not move the data off of the system drive, even though it claimed that is what it was doing.

    As I understand the way drive balancer works, it just fills up certain drives with fake files to get the drive extender/migration piece to do what we want. Since it appears migration doesn't really work 100% the way it is supposed to on paper, I wasn't too surprised that it didn't work.

    Maybe it doesn't work with Power Pack 3?


    Anyway, I wiped the new drive on a different machine, and restarted the restore process. I am receiving the same request not supported error code.

    Any additional ideas?


    Even though it is unsupported, would Ghost or Acronis work? I've read several threads where people mention that it works. Wouldn't there be a problem with the way the system would read the system disk though? It would continue to think it was the old drive, rather than the new, and retain the old serial number/label. Would there be other side effects?

    *Edit: since the installer DVD is power pack 1, could that be the issue? Do I need to have a power pack 3 disc to perform a Server Restore of a power pack 3 system? If so, is this the only method to create one?:  http://wegotserved.co.uk/wiki/index.php?title=Slipstream_Windows_Home_Server
    Wednesday, February 24, 2010 3:14 AM
  • Cloning the system disk isn't supported, and may result in issues such as incorrectly reported system space, etc. There's a thread over on mediasmartserver.net that describes a way to clone the system drive anyway in order to upgrade it. I don't guarantee it will work for you, however.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Wednesday, February 24, 2010 3:58 AM
    Moderator
  • It looks like that link I posted above is only for integrating drivers into the install DVD, not for adding the power pack. It appears there is no supported way to do that either. I read a posted from the guy here that says he has done it, however: http://forum.wegotserved.com/index.php?/topic/11399-slipstream-pp3-into-install-dvd/

    The fact that there is no supported way leads me to believe that this isn't the answer. If it was, that would mean anyone with a pp3 updated server will never be able to do a server restore with the disc they have.

    I could start over, installing WHS fresh on a non-dying disk and move all of my data back over manually (jockeying hard drives around like the first time), but I will be in the same situation down the road when that new drive fails. Not much of a solution...

    I'm going to ponder this for another day, but it seems like I'll have to go back to straight server 2003. 

    True, I could ghost the disk even though it is unsupported, but the fact that I am running into an issue nobody can answer in the first 2 weeks I have been using WHS really saps my confidence in the product. One of the ancillary reasons I went with WHS was so that I could sell it as a solution to my customers, home users, etc. At this point, I can't do that either given my experience so far.

    Any ideas? Thanks again for all your help,


    Thursday, February 25, 2010 12:01 AM
  • For anybody who finds themself in this same boat without a paddle, follow Olaf's advice here:


    • Go to the section that talks about if the server reinstall fails. I followed that process, and opted to leave all the drives mounted in the server, just disconnected until I completed a full, fresh installation. I had one drive already empty (in addition to the system drive), so I left that one connected.
    • Next, make sure to go through all the updates first. I just ran them from the Windows Update website, seemed faster.
    • Then, reconnect your drives with data on them., navigate to their driveletter:\DE\Shares and copy your data to \\servername\sharename. 
    • I found Teracopy to be very helpful in the manual copying process. It also gives the warm fuzzy with the CRC.
    • On my dying drive that I disconnected, I just connect to my workstation via USB and copied everything across the network, same method.

    Took me 2 weeks worth of evenings to get all this completed. Hopefully MS will include a system drive backup/restore process that works in the next version.
    • Marked as answer by saaron34 Friday, March 5, 2010 1:18 AM
    Friday, March 5, 2010 1:17 AM
  • Every now and again I come to such threads in the hope that the WHS team will fix this obvious error and allow us a simple method to move storage off the main HD.  I don't really care how big or small the main HD is; I just want an easy way to replace it If I consider the drive may be failing.

    I have 5+TB of other stuff in storage from my 4 PC's networked to my WHS and so no easy way to make backups, ____ that's the reason I built a WHS server.
    Monday, March 8, 2010 2:57 AM
  • In terms of data at risk in your shares, there is nothing special about the system drive. Any failing drive risks data in the shares exactly the same way. See this FAQ for more information.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, March 8, 2010 3:58 AM
    Moderator
  • In terms of data at risk in your shares, there is nothing special about the system drive. Any failing drive risks data in the shares exactly the same way. See this FAQ for more information.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    Hello Ken,

    Thanks for the reply. The risk factors of a failing drive are understood, I think you understand that ever hopeful of improvement we are bitching out loud about the concept of sharing the main drive for storage and the difficulty it offers us to change it out since we can't control what is stored there - being original or replicated files.

    I can manage my data storage files, spread content around my network if need be to avoid the need to buy 2 more 1.5TB HD's to have replication running on everything while I make any surgery needed, but so far I haven't seen any simple guide on how to change out the main HD.

    My HD hasn't failed, but it is the oldest drive - circa 3 years (750GB) and I would like to change it out. Ideally I would reduce its size to have less data stored on it and add this drive to the pool for replication, however WHS won't let us control that - except by size of HD.  

    So to keep it simple, if I was to want to change the 750GB for a 1.5TB what would be the simple process?  (Insert link here :)
    )
    As I understand it (at least for me) it would be, move existing folder storage to other PC's in the network until there is space in the Server for replication to be turned on for all folders left there.  Go away several hours while it does that.

    Avoiding WHS wanting to back up these new temporary data locations in the network (it will not have enough space). 

    Replace the HD using the following process (insert link here) and load the WHS SW I think with the pool drives not connected.  When all is done connect the pool drives and wait while WHS sorts itself out.

    Move data back to WHS and set replication as required based on available pool storage.

    I'm sure there are many threads with a process we could use - I got confused looking for them and at some of the ideas offered.  If you could insert suggested links I would be grateful and it would be useful for others.
     


    Monday, March 8, 2010 1:57 PM
  • To change out the system drive, you replace it (physically remove the old one and install the new one) and perform a server recovery leaving all your drives fully connected. It's very important that they be connected; if they aren't Windows Home Server will be unable to re-integrate them after the fact. The risks to your shares and backups are the same, and are laid out in that FAQ I linked. The risk to other data on your server (the users you've created, software you've installed, etc., i.e. everything on C:) is also in the FAQ.

    Server recovery (or reinstallation, if your server is home-built and your media is pre-Power Pack 1) has been covered repeatedly in the forums, but if you can't find it, look here for one example.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, March 8, 2010 5:31 PM
    Moderator
  • Well an extensive overseas travel schedule stopped me from doing the swap and the subject HD rewarded me by failing. WHS detirmined the system drive needed repair and when I returned and allowed it - bingo it would not boot past the windows flash, the blue screen was too fast for me.

    I am using the manufactures test tools and its fixed 6 LBA errors so far, this HD has to come out of my server ASAP, but hopefully it will boot into WHS and allow me to play with replication first. If it does boot, I'll probably go and get a new HD to suppliment the one on order before it fails again.

    My WHS is the older OEM - self build PC (I assume pre PP1) and has 2 disks the installation and a recovery disk. When should you use recovery vs. installation? I guess it depends which gives the option of Server Re-installation (recovery).

    Well fingers crossed about the current system disk and booting from - an hour or so more and I'll be ready to try.

    If it doesn't work I will need to try Re-Installation with pooled drives attached, hence my question about which CD to use?

    Failing that, its a new drive, new installation with pooled drives unattached and recover what I can from the current system drive, right?

     

    Thanks

    Sunday, April 25, 2010 3:31 PM
  • Well an extensive overseas travel schedule stopped me from doing the swap and the subject HD rewarded me by failing. WHS detirmined the system drive needed repair and when I returned and allowed it - bingo it would not boot past the windows flash, the blue screen was too fast for me.

    I am using the manufactures test tools and its fixed 6 LBA errors so far, this HD has to come out of my server ASAP, but hopefully it will boot into WHS and allow me to play with replication first. If it does boot, I'll probably go and get a new HD to suppliment the one on order before it fails again.

    My WHS is the older OEM - self build PC (I assume pre PP1) and has 2 disks the installation and a recovery disk. When should you use recovery vs. installation? I guess it depends which gives the option of Server Re-installation (recovery).

    Well fingers crossed about the current system disk and booting from - an hour or so more and I'll be ready to try.

    If it doesn't work I will need to try Re-Installation with pooled drives attached, hence my question about which CD to use? 

    The restore CD is to restore your clients.  You need to boot from the installation DVD and select Server Reinstallation.

    Failing that, its a new drive, new installation with pooled drives unattached and recover what I can from the current system drive, right? 

    Thanks

    While you can do a New Installation (with your secondary drives not connected during the install process), you would then have a long process of copying everything from every drive to your new install (not just your primary drive).  You would be much better off using Server Reinstallation.
    Sunday, April 25, 2010 4:33 PM
    Moderator


  • While you can do a New Installation (with your secondary drives not connected during the install process), you would then have a long process of copying everything from every drive to your new install (not just your primary drive).  You would be much better off using Server Reinstallation.

     

    Understood, but that assumes I will get the option of re-installation and new installation which I read was not assured. The comment on pool not attached was for what I believe relates only to new installation to avoid writing over the pool drives - I made that mistake many years ago.                                                                                                                                    

    I will know shortly - I now have a new drive in hand so will see if the old one boots. Edit: Its booting only one error message, now to replicate more important folders and next step is re-installation on the new drive.

     

    Sunday, April 25, 2010 7:26 PM
  • To change out the system drive, you replace it (physically remove the old one and install the new one) and perform a server recovery leaving all your drives fully connected .

    I'm sorry experts, I just want to be sure before starting off. WHS is working fine at present, I want to remove the current 750GB System HD from the mix. So now I:

    1. Remove old system drive.

    2. Install new empty drive.

    3. Attempt re-installation using the original software DVD with pool drives connected. Wait while it recreates itself.

    4. Assuming success and after updating to PP3, connect the original system drive to a PC on the network and copy any found and wanted files from there. 

    Per WHS there is roughly 2.5TB of video files not duplicated, but circa 50% is currently stored elsewhere in the network and all is replaceable. Its time to do clean out anyway.

    For the new system drive I could use a 1 year old WD 750GB or a new 1.5TB Seagate, my first thought was to use the 1.5TB but then any next system issue will have far more data on the system drive, so I think I'm going to go with the smaller drive for system, add the 1.5TB to pool and then clear out some old video or just store the not to loose stuff elsewhere until finished that way I should be able to duplicate it all, or I can wait 5 days until the other HD arrives .....

    Is 1-4 correct?  Opinions about which drive to use as system?

     

    Many thanks


    Britgeezer
    Sunday, April 25, 2010 8:54 PM
  • I'm sorry experts, I just want to be sure before starting off. WHS is working fine at present, I want to remove the current 750GB System HD from the mix. So now I:

    1. Remove old system drive.

    2. Install new empty drive.

    3. Attempt re-installation using the original software DVD with pool drives connected. Wait while it recreates itself.

    4. Assuming success and after updating to PP3, connect the original system drive to a PC on the network and copy any found and wanted files from there. 

    Per WHS there is roughly 2.5TB of video files not duplicated, but circa 50% is currently stored elsewhere in the network and all is replaceable. Its time to do clean out anyway.

    For the new system drive I could use a 1 year old WD 750GB or a new 1.5TB Seagate, my first thought was to use the 1.5TB but then any next system issue will have far more data on the system drive, so I think I'm going to go with the smaller drive for system, add the 1.5TB to pool and then clear out some old video or just store the not to loose stuff elsewhere until finished that way I should be able to duplicate it all, or I can wait 5 days until the other HD arrives .....

    Is 1-4 correct?  Opinions about which drive to use as system? 

    Many thanks


    Britgeezer
    Sounds about right to me.  :)  As for which drive to use, it really doesn't matter (WHS doesn't store any data on the primary drive unless there is no room anywhere else).
    Sunday, April 25, 2010 10:08 PM
    Moderator
  • Sounds about right to me.  :)  As for which drive to use, it really doesn't matter (WHS doesn't store any data on the primary drive unless there is no room anywhere else).
    OK thanks, I'll add the 1.5TB as pool storage, that should minimize the potential for stuff being on the System drive - add least after a few hours for balancing.

    Britgeezer
    Monday, April 26, 2010 1:28 AM
  • Update - I'm in trouble.

    I decided to wait until the 2nd HD arrived so that everything would be duplicated - just in case. That is installed and balanced a few times.

    For reference they are all SATA but using the IDE config i.e. resident drivers work, my recovery work on the failing HD created an error message on starting WHS " some features of WHS may not have been installed or available"  

    I used the "remove" feature to move data off the 750GB that will be the sys drive but left the drive in place. 

    I physically removed the old sys drive and changed the sata cable over so the same drive  should have been assigned to the new HD and booted to my OS installation disk. I could see all drives but the intended target for the OS shows removed.

    I was not given a reinstall OS option only new, so I put the original OS drive back.  This caused a warning of configuration changed you must "re-register" with MS. within 3 days - everything was running very slow so I did.

    Now I'm trying to reinstall over the old HD, again this option was not available - only new install.

    Its now very hard to log into WHS console - error message that it can't log in but if I skip the issue eventually it starts - but its now missing the storage drive menu - I had thought that I need to add the new drive as a backup ( not to pool).

    So WHS is running (albeit slowly) and making back ups, shares can be accessed, but I can't seem to get the reinstallation option.

    Any suggestions on how to avoid a new installation and having to copy each pool drive manually?

       

     


    Britgeezer
    Friday, April 30, 2010 1:48 PM
  • ...
    Any suggestions on how to avoid a new installation and having to copy each pool drive manually?

    What it comes down to is this: There are many reasons why reinstallation isn't offered as an option. Nobody (except perhaps Microsoft) knows exactly what they all are. That includes me; I've seen several variations on your problem, all of which eventually came down to "hardware configuration", but I know I haven't seen everything.

    You can try deleting any partitions on your (new) system disk prior to installation, to see if that helps. If you have both IDE and SATA drives in your system, you will probably find that a SATA drive won't be presented as the boot drive by the BIOS; this can be impossible to overcome (it's really an issue in the BIOS), and is likely to be a blocking issue.

    As a practical matter, though, you may want to move forward with a new installation and accept the "Windows Home Server shuffle".


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, April 30, 2010 2:07 PM
    Moderator
  • You can try deleting any partitions on your (new) system disk prior to installation, to see if that helps. If you have both IDE and SATA drives in your system, you will probably find that a SATA drive won't be presented as the boot drive by the BIOS; this can be impossible to overcome (it's really an issue in the BIOS), and is likely to be a blocking issue.

    As a practical matter, though, you may want to move forward with a new installation and accept the "Windows Home Server shuffle".


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    Well I double checked and found that the old OS Sys drive was not assigned drive 0 so I moved the Sata cable until it was. They are all Sata drives and all seen by the setup. After booting and the normal; error message, on the 2nd attempt I manged to get into console and manage drive options was now available, so I designated the New Sys drive as a data drive - (not pool) and rebooted.

    Now with the original Sys HD I have the reinstall option

    Do you think it may be worthwhile doing that since, I assume it will reformat and there is not much customization to lose in WHS maybe it will fix any tombstone error? 

    Then with a new valid OS, I can remove the old Sys drive and try to re-install on the new drive and if not go the new install route.  Do you think I would be better off to "remove" the "new HD and reformat it on another PC before trying re-installation on this new drive? 

     

    As ever thanks


    Britgeezer
    Friday, April 30, 2010 4:52 PM
  • I would:

    • remove the old system drive (it's failing, right?)
    • install the new larger system drive in some other computer temporarily, then remove all partitions from that drive. If you know how to use diskpart , that would be ideal.
    • Install the new drive in place of the old drive, and see if you get a reinstallation option. Remember that, if your drives are set to a SATA mode (AHCI, RAID, SATA) in the BIOS, you'll need appropriate drivers for your storage controller twice. The first time is on the hardware detection screen, where drives are shown. The second time is just after the first reboot, into text-mode setup for Windows Server 2003, at the "Press F6" prompt. If you need drivers at the "Press F6" prompt, you will need to supply them on a floppy disk.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, April 30, 2010 9:31 PM
    Moderator
  • I removed the old drive and since I have only 1 partition on any of my drives, swapped the new drive to be "0" and was offered re-installation!

    It obviously take a while to copy and update the data so I will just wait awhile before doing anything else. Surprisingly I have not been offered the chance to add Network drivers yet, so WHS is critical as it can't connect to the network or the internet.

    Thanks for the tips.

     


    Britgeezer
    Saturday, May 1, 2010 2:49 AM