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WHS2011 UR4: don't see it installed; don't see it available to install RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'd expected to see something that looked like "Update Rollup 4 for Windows Home Server 2011 (KB2757011)" or similar in Update History or Check for updates. Nada. Also no hint of KB2757014 on the clients.

    And don't see anything in recent threads that might explain this and do see traffic and articles on the WHS friendly sites suggesting that this past Tuesday was the day.

    Any thoughts as to why this might be?

    Friday, December 14, 2012 2:48 AM

All replies

  • Do you have Auto Updates switched on? It should have downloaded on the 11th (along with a number of other updates) and should show up as "Update Rollup for Windows Home Server 2011 (KB2757011)" in Windows Update, View Updte History. Did you receive lots of Security Updates on the 11th?

    Phil P.S. If you find my comment helpful or if it answers your question, please mark it as such.

    Friday, December 14, 2012 3:36 AM
  • Yes, Auto Update is on.

    It didn't install anything on the morning of the 12th. Dunno why not but I've seen it download one morning and install the next before. On the morning of the 13th it installed a bunch. From the log, reading up and typed here down:

    KB2765809 (these were from 3:00 to 3:02 on the morning of the 13th)
    KB2753842
    KB2758857
    KB2761465
    KB2770660
    KB890830
    KB2779562
    KB890830 (listed again--these were at 6:05 on the morning of the 13th -- here is where I found it in some confused BIOS attempting to boot loop that Ctrl+Alt+Delete didn't solve and cold rebooted/WinUpdated the important ones till it got happy--it reported that there was an "unexpected shutdown"; it's on an UPS and there were no signs of power events on anything else this morning)
    KB2779562 (listed again)
    KB2770660 (listed again)
    KB2765809 (listed again)
    KB2758857 (listed again)
    KB2753842 (listed again)
    KB2761465 (listed again)
    KB2779030 (This was at 6:24 on the morning of the 13th -- here is where I attempted to put on the listed optionals after it seemed to sort out all of the above)
    KB947821 (the SURT--listed as "Important")
    KB2506143 (the first failure in the log for WMF 3.0)

    Wondering about rolling back to some system restore point or how to flush the WinUpdate database. ... Oh. No restore points in WS2008R2... Getting depressed. Time to go to bed and hope for an overnight miracle from the WHS elves. ... Now thinking about restore of C: to 11:00 pm on the 12th. But when I start asking myself "what's the worst that could happen?" I know I'm in trouble and generally headed deeper.

    • Edited by Dick Watson Friday, December 14, 2012 5:24 AM still more data
    Friday, December 14, 2012 4:55 AM
  • Did some due diligence on the process, screwed up my courage, and restored the server back to 11:00pm on the 12th. That was way simple and worked great. It had a whole bunch of patches waiting to install including UR4. Put them on manually a few at a time and all ended up well. UR4 installed. WMF3 installed. All happy.

    Before I did the restore, I looked in events from 3:00am on the 13th to 5:30 am on the 13th. Nothing much of interest--except apparently a client backup going on while a WinUpdate was going on. At 3:02 and some change, the last event was recorded. Whatever happened next will never be known but it wasn't good...

    I remember how insistent the WHS v1 team was that we didn't need server backup. I'm really pleased the 2011 team saw fit to give us a proper server backup capability. Saved me HOURS and lots of headache. Thumbs Up to them. Makes me forget my unhappiness with MS over Win 8 for a few minutes.

    Saturday, December 15, 2012 3:27 AM
  • Excellent. Not sure I agree with you about W8 though (the temporary unhappiness that is) - mine will continue until I am able to efficiently use it as a PC rather than a phone! W7 will by my choice until then.

    Phil P.S. If you find my comment helpful or if it answers your question, please mark it as such.

    Saturday, December 15, 2012 4:26 AM
  • ... until I am able to efficiently use it as a PC rather than a phone! ...

    I really wish Microsoft would give us a "Like" button. :)

    I see no reason to install Windows 8 on anything. On desktop and standard laptop computers, it's horrible. On tablets, there's a reason Microsoft is pushing those keyboards with trackpad; it's because there are apps that are just thinly veneered Windows apps that don't work with touch at all well. And overall, the live tiles make me feel like I'm in the middle of a carnival. :P On a phone, it's still not up there with the iPhone interface.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    Saturday, December 15, 2012 5:32 PM
  • I use an iPhone and iPad for my portable devices!

    Phil P.S. If you find my comment helpful or if it answers your question, please mark it as such.

    Saturday, December 15, 2012 6:12 PM
  • Windows 8 is awesome.

    Just thought I'd balance the discussion a little. ;-)

    Monday, December 17, 2012 8:59 PM
  • Steve Sinofsky's mom thinks it's great too. So that's two votes in favor.
    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 1:24 AM
  • Windows 8 is awesome.

    Just thought I'd balance the discussion a little. ;-)


    Some of the underlying technologies are OK. Storage Spaces as an example, but the User Interface is a disaster for computer users!!

    Phil P.S. If you find my comment helpful or if it answers your question, please mark it as such.

    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 1:58 AM
  • Some of the underlying technologies are OK. Storage Spaces as an example, but the User Interface is a disaster for computer users!!


    Phil P.S. If you find my comment helpful or if it answers your question, please mark it as such.

    Well, I know I won't convince you, but maybe you'll find this video at least a little bit fun:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ODFvy1mjoY&feature=youtu.be

    FWIW, my kids picked up Windows 8 like ducks in water; it was then that I realized how old and crusty I'd become. :-)    After living with it for a couple of months I have come to really like it.

    If you run a large desktop display, remember that you don't need to use any of the new touch-based apps if you don't wish to.  You can even unpin all of that stuff from your Start screen and it then becomes a launcher for your desktop applications. 

    If you absolutely MUST have the Start Menu back, I recommend Start8 from Stardock (but I find I don't miss it).

    Wednesday, December 19, 2012 6:32 PM
  • (sorry for the thread drift, but, hey, it's my thread...)

    Thanks for posting the link to that video.

    It demonstrates precisely what a lot of us don't like about Modern. It shows a small screen, touch enabled, device being used exclusively in the phablet-centric Modern UI to do not much of anything of consequence. If that's how most of us used PCs most of the time, we'd probably think Win8 was the neatest thing since Win95. But that's not what PC users have or want to do.

    And it's not just about the Start menu. And you can't stay in the full function UI without some effort. Try to run WinUpdate. If you just search for Update, and click on settings, it does NOT present the full function Windows Update (except as, say Install Optional Updates or View Update History). Just yesterday I double-clicked on a .JPG from File Explorer in the real desktop. It opened the file in the Modern app. And on and on it goes like that. Almost nothing about the Win8 UIs was about PC users and PC use cases. Almost all of it was about forcing us to learn to love and want ModernUI on phones and tablets.


    • Edited by Dick Watson Wednesday, December 19, 2012 7:30 PM
    Wednesday, December 19, 2012 7:29 PM
  • Hi Dick.

    Yes, I too believe Microsoft could have introduced the modern UI and Windows touch computing *without* alienating long-time Windows users had they simply offered more choice.  Having a choice in configuring the default media handlers to open desktop apps instead of Metro apps, as you cite, is one example.  On my desktop PCs, I had to spend a few minutes resetting the defaults for media files, downloading Adobe Reader, etc.  That said, it only took a few moments to do this, and I gained all that time back in about a week from reduced boot times alone. 

    You wrote: "It demonstrates precisely what a lot of us don't like about Modern. It shows a small screen, touch enabled, device being used exclusively in the phablet-centric Modern UI to do not much of anything of consequence. If that's how most of us used PCs most of the time, we'd probably think Win8 was the neatest thing since Win95. But that's not what PC users have or want to do."

    I hate to say this, but those of us who love PCs and have some expertise in them will become an increasingly small niche.  PC computing in the last two decades has been a lot like owning a car in the early days of the automobile: you basically had to be a mechanic to drive one.  The mobile computing revolution is proving that most people don't have time or the desire to deal with complicated devices that frustrate more than they delight Like it or not, touch is here and it's pushing out "traditional" PC computing quite rapidly.

    Thursday, December 20, 2012 1:03 AM
  • Mobile is here, no doubt. Cloud is here, no doubt. Digital media consumption and the usage model appropriate to that is here, no doubt.

    When people run Microsoft VS or Adobe CS or AutoCad or SAP or TeamCenter or ... on their tablets or phones all day long, I'll be right there saying "boy I'm glad we have ModernUI for this".

    Personal Computing, in the sense of using a PC to watch Netflix and tweet and reddit and pinterest and instagram and on and on, and send endless amounts of money to "content providers" for content to graze through, and watch endless ads, and have endless opportunities to help Fortune 100 companies "monetize" our lives to their benefit, and all of that kind of stuff, solely at home, sitting at a large display and keyboard, is dying. Or dead. It's been a long time since PCs, desktop or laptop, weren't vast overkill for that use case.

    Personal Computing in the sense of using reasonably powerful desktop or portable computing devices to create content, develop software, design and engineer things, manage businesses, prepare endless mindless PowerPoint presentations, operate computing plants, operate control systems, monitor and operate satellites, administer the cloud, etc., ain't going away anytime soon. And Modern UI just gets in the way of all of that.


    • Edited by Dick Watson Thursday, December 20, 2012 4:10 AM
    Thursday, December 20, 2012 4:09 AM