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WLOC Update 5 min. ago: O.K., I'M PERPLEXED! RRS feed

  • Question

  • Ca. 5 min. ago, I was working on my computer when a WLOC box opened up over my Office 2007 browser, telling me:

     

    (1) That there was an update for WLOC;

    (2) That WLOC would be unavailable while this update was  . . . downloading, I guess?;

    (3) That the box would close when the update was over;

    (4) That I should not shut down or restart my computer.

     

    Two things bothered me:

     

    First, this has never happened before.

     

    Second, the WLOC icon in the tray -- or, is it sand box? (I always forget.) -- disappeared.  This makes me wonder and worry about whether WLOC was deactivated during the update.  In other words, was I left without protection for the 30 sec. WLOC was doing whatever it was doing???  Otherwise, why did the icon disappear?

     

    I clicked "Cancel" at the bottom of the WLOC box (which I probably shouldn't have done, since now I'm not sure if the update actually "took").

     

    COULD SOMEONE OFFER AN EXPLANATION FOR THIS?

    Friday, November 14, 2008 11:07 PM

Answers

  • It's not a big deal. OneCare always downloads any updates for AV/AS detections or the program itself in the background, which never requires the program to be disabled. The notification you saw only appears when the program starts to install the updates, primarily to avoid the need to reboot the PC after the install is completed.

     

    During this time, though the program is shut down, so is the firewall so nothing can get into the PC during that period anyway. Though I've never heard any specifics, I'm also quite certain it wouldn't start such an update if an AV scan or other critical operation was being performed.

     

    The WLOC icon (winssnotify.exe) in the "Taskbar Notification Area" (System Tray is an inaccurate slang term), is shut down along with everything else that will be updated. Sometimes only portions of the program are updated, but this may still require other portions to be shut down if there are dependencies.

     

    The primary point to remember, if OneCare is telling you it's going to do something you should probably trust it, because if you don't why are you using it in the first place? One of the ultimate fallacies with today's sophistcated software is to believe you really know what it's doing. What a program says may not have anything to do with what's really happening, which is what Fake Antivirus and other malware depend on. If you can't trust the programs you've chosen to be your protection from such 'badware', you might as well just throw the PC away.

     

    The best method I've found is to research and find a piece of software you like and then trust it until it proves otherwise. Second guessing will simply get you in trouble for no good reason. You don't have the basis to make the decision anyway, so why assume that you might? Even I, with over 30 years experience in the computer industry (before the original IBM PC!), can't possibly know everything a program is doing, so I let it do it's thing and then research it later if I really care to know. The only time I'd break this rule is if it intends to do something irreversible to some of my personal data, such as a deletion, where I'd investigate before commiting if possible.

     

    OneCareBear

    Saturday, November 15, 2008 6:20 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • I checked the Support Log and saw the following:

     

    11/14/2008 5:56 PM
    Successfully Renewed Monitor Cert for User Admin

     

    I'm still not sure what this means.  But, at least, it was successful.

    Friday, November 14, 2008 11:24 PM
  • It's not a big deal. OneCare always downloads any updates for AV/AS detections or the program itself in the background, which never requires the program to be disabled. The notification you saw only appears when the program starts to install the updates, primarily to avoid the need to reboot the PC after the install is completed.

     

    During this time, though the program is shut down, so is the firewall so nothing can get into the PC during that period anyway. Though I've never heard any specifics, I'm also quite certain it wouldn't start such an update if an AV scan or other critical operation was being performed.

     

    The WLOC icon (winssnotify.exe) in the "Taskbar Notification Area" (System Tray is an inaccurate slang term), is shut down along with everything else that will be updated. Sometimes only portions of the program are updated, but this may still require other portions to be shut down if there are dependencies.

     

    The primary point to remember, if OneCare is telling you it's going to do something you should probably trust it, because if you don't why are you using it in the first place? One of the ultimate fallacies with today's sophistcated software is to believe you really know what it's doing. What a program says may not have anything to do with what's really happening, which is what Fake Antivirus and other malware depend on. If you can't trust the programs you've chosen to be your protection from such 'badware', you might as well just throw the PC away.

     

    The best method I've found is to research and find a piece of software you like and then trust it until it proves otherwise. Second guessing will simply get you in trouble for no good reason. You don't have the basis to make the decision anyway, so why assume that you might? Even I, with over 30 years experience in the computer industry (before the original IBM PC!), can't possibly know everything a program is doing, so I let it do it's thing and then research it later if I really care to know. The only time I'd break this rule is if it intends to do something irreversible to some of my personal data, such as a deletion, where I'd investigate before commiting if possible.

     

    OneCareBear

    Saturday, November 15, 2008 6:20 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for the clarification.

     

    I'm presuming that when you say: "the program is shut down, so is the firewall," you mean that the firewall closes all the ports so that there's no traffic coming in or out.  I don't think you mean that the firewall is totally turned off (although, that's what WLOC said briefly happened during the update).

     

    I appreciate your counsel . . . but, I wasn't sitting there trying to second-guess the product; I'm only acting on WLOC's own prompts.

     

    If WLOC shows me an ominous red shield with an "X" on it, warning me -- not simply telling me -- that my firewall has been disabled and that I'm not protected, then I think I'm within my rights to be concerned and ask what's going on.

     

    In fact, isn't that the whole point behind WLOC's "Stay green!" philosophy?

    Saturday, November 15, 2008 8:02 PM
  • Yes, that's why I personally believe they should just shut up and do it without ever telling the users, since all it does is create confusion.

     

    No matter what the messages might seem to imply, I'm quite certain that the firewall is never intentionally totally disabled in the inbound direction. They are merely warning you to let the OneCare update complete properly to avoid a failure due to user intervention. This is what I meant in my previous message, since there are some common sense situations that though obvious, may seem confusing based on messaging.

     

    OneCareBear

    Sunday, November 16, 2008 12:38 AM
    Moderator