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  • Question

  • OK, after much research and lots of clicking I think I have it together:

     

    Whole list on NewEgg

     

    So I split out the list for ease of viewing:

     

    Crucial 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM ECC Unbuffered DDR2 667 (PC2 5300) Dual Channel Kit Server Memory

    This wasn't on Intel's approved memory list, but it came up through Crucial's website. I think 4 GB is good enough, and the DDR 800 is just too expensive.  Should I risk it not working in the board?

     

    Intel S3200SHV LGA 775 Intel 3200 Server Motherboard

    It doesn't have as many expansion slots as I'd like, but it does have 6 SATA ports so I should be good for a while on hard drive space.  It's low on USB ports but I can't think of many USB devices I would ever connect to this, unless it's something having to do with home automation.  I don't think I'll ever need a x16 PCI-E slot, and it's got built in VGA so no need for a graphics card.

     

    Intel Xeon E3110 Wolfdale 3.0GHz 6MB L2 Cache LGA 775 65W Dual-Core Processor

    Should be cool, quiet, and consume low power.  This will be just a file server, iTunes server, run backups, and hopefully run some geeky home control software someday.

     

    SeaSonic M12 SS-600HM ATX12V / EPS12V 600W Power Supply 100 - 240 V UL, CE, CB, TUV, FCC

    80 PLUS certified, 5 year warranty, and modular cables.  I will never own another non-modular power supply if I can help it.  I need to double check the included cables tho.  I'll have at least 4 hard drives going once this rig gets up and running.

     

    Western Digital VelociRaptor WD3000GLFS 300GB 10000 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive

    I am on the fence on this one.  I figure this would be the OS drive and therefore landing zone.  The faster this drive is, the faster I can write to the server, right?

     

    Antec Nine Hundred Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case 

    Has always gotten good reviews.  I like the fans blowing over where I figure the hard drives are gonna go.  Should have plenty of space and cooling and that's about all I need, I figure.

     

    Did I leave anything out?  This is going to be the first computer I've ever built without a floppy drive.  *gasp*  I have a supply of 750 GB Seagates that I'll toss in there as needed.  I do have an extra 320 GB Seagate, so if the folks here think the Western Digital needs to get kicked off the list, I'll throw in the 320.  I've got a spare keyboard and mouse, of course.  Oh, the OS is on the NewEgg list, of course.  I was surprised to see that this is a 32 bit OS.  Odd.  I would have guessed it was a 64 bit.

     

    So, what are your thoughts?  I appreciate the help.

     

    -Matt

    Friday, August 22, 2008 7:14 AM

Answers

  • Hi Matt,

    my opinion: nice to have, a bit overpowered 9 (as of now), but ready for the future.

    The disk is with it's high rotation speed a potential noise maker.

    The only issue which may come into: no floppy controller on the mainboard any more, means you could need an USB floppy drive, if by bad luck a driver floppy is requested during the installation process for the SATA controller.

     

    Best greetings from Germany

    Olaf

    Friday, August 22, 2008 8:25 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi Matt,

    my opinion: nice to have, a bit overpowered 9 (as of now), but ready for the future.

    The disk is with it's high rotation speed a potential noise maker.

    The only issue which may come into: no floppy controller on the mainboard any more, means you could need an USB floppy drive, if by bad luck a driver floppy is requested during the installation process for the SATA controller.

     

    Best greetings from Germany

    Olaf

    Friday, August 22, 2008 8:25 AM
    Moderator
  • Overall I think you're spending more than you absolutely have to. That's mostly because you're buying server grade components, which isn't a bad thing. But that drives your cost up by at least $350. Regarding your processor, Xeons are not "cool" or "low power".

    If you want to be able to use your SATA ports in SATA mode, rather than legacy IDE mode (or whatever the BIOS on that board calls it) make certain the motherboard supports booting from USB and get a bootable USB floppy drive. You will almost certainly need drivers to get SATA working properly, as Windows Home Server doesn't include a wide selection of drivers, and the drivers will need to be delivered during both hardware discovery (at the very beginning) and in text-mode setup (which is where the floppy is required).  And I wouldn't bother with the VelociRaptor drive. You won't see much benefit from it, versus any 7,200 RPM drive. If the Seagate is pretty new, I'd use it instead.
    Friday, August 22, 2008 11:33 AM
    Moderator
  •  Matt Greer wrote:

     

    Antec Nine Hundred Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case 

    Has always gotten good reviews.  I like the fans blowing over where I figure the hard drives are gonna go.  Should have plenty of space and cooling and that's about all I need, I figure.

     

     

    I question your choice of case. Yes, its a great gaming case, I own a Nine Hundred and  Twelve Hundred, but they are both gaming PCs.

     

    My problem with the Nine Hundred as a server comes from personal experience. 1. Its an open airflow case, meaning air is drawn *through* the case. There are no filters on the Nine Hundred. Also part of the open airflow is the fact that the case is perforated everywhere. This means great airflow, but also, lots and lots of dust. 2. Exposed power button, not a bad thing usually, but I have 2 sons that love to push buttons. 3. Size, while not huge, it is big, it is heavy and it takes up lots of space.

     

    My Windows Home Server is actually in a Antec Sonata III.

     

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129024&Tpk=sonata%20IIi

     

    I love this case for my WHS. Lots of room for drives, I just use 5.25 to 3.5 adapters and use the upper bays for additional drives. The side and front both lock, and the front covers the floppy drive and the power buttons.

     

    I do not use an internal CD drive. I have a very nice external USB 2.0 optical drive that reads and burns just about everything.

     

     

     

    Friday, August 22, 2008 11:52 AM
  • You all have made some excellent points.  Thank you all for your feedback!

     

    The board does not have a PATA interface, so I'll have to get a SATA DVD-ROM.  I'm building another computer for myself so I'll just use the DVD until I get stuff installed and then remove it to save the SATA port.

     

    From reading on NewEgg, not all USB floppy drives are "boot" compatible.  Anyone with a USB floppy able to F6 the drivers on installation?

     

    I'll defend the case I chose by saying that I want fans blowing over the hard drives.  That is the only reason I chose that case.  Dust is not a problem; I can blow the thing out every so often.  I can also add some gauze or filters in front of the fans.  But your points are definitely valid.  I'll be in a closet so noise is not an issue either.

     

    I realize that the Raptor drive will only increase speed on writes to the server.  So I'm going to drop that off my list and grab one of my existing 320s.

     

    Updated Parts List

    *Changes: Removed Raptor, added SATA DVD

     

     

    Friday, August 22, 2008 6:46 PM
  • I have a bootable USB floppy, and yes, I can "F6" drivers off it when I need to. It's a question of having the right motherboard support. I don't use it much, but it's been very helpful a time or two. As for the DVD, if you can find a bootable external USB DVD (they exist, though I've never had a need for one), that would be great and you can always connect it to some other computer later...

    Personally I'm neutral to the case. It won't be quiet, but, well, what else is new? Smile
    Friday, August 22, 2008 7:09 PM
    Moderator
  • I use a Coolermaster Stacker STC101. It is big and can be noisy if you add on the hard drive caddies and connect the fans but it is very cool running, has bay cover filters and holds up to 12 hard drives. It also has the facility to add a second power supply which is a great option when you have a case full of drives and fans.

     

    http://www.coolermaster.com/products/product.php?language=uk&act=detail&tbcate=636&id=1048

     

    I've had my homeserver in it for approx 1 year and no issues whatsoever. Only minor gripe is adding drives using the 4 into 3 drive adaptors neccessitates removing the caddies but once you have got the hang of it, it takes less than 10 minutes.

     

    I also use the same case for my main desktop PC albeit with slightly less cooling and only 1 power supply.

     

     

     

    Saturday, August 30, 2008 11:43 AM