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Home Server and Linux CIFS Mount... RRS feed

  • Question

  • Greetings!  I was just wondering if anyone had any experience with Home Server and Linux CIFS mounts?

    I know/assume I can (probably) safely mount any of the regular share but the problem is I have too many share so I want to be able to mount the D$ share directly:

    /sbin/mount.cifs  //IP_ADDRESS/d$/shares /mnt/whs-ousername=administrator

    (I of course will use the credentials option to safeguard the password)


    Will this cause any known issues? Anybody else have this working without a problem (in testing I was able to mount it but I dont know if there are other specific home server issues that may cause corruption above and beyond the known corruption issues)

    Thanks!!


    Thursday, March 13, 2008 1:43 AM

Answers

  • An interesting question. I haven't tried it (not a Linux guy) but I can't see where you would have a problem. A share is a share, after all. You probably realize this, but by going to the administrative share that way, you're bypassing all security.
    Thursday, March 13, 2008 3:19 PM
    Moderator
  • The recommendation is because WHS Drive Extender is designed to work with network shares. As it happens, it also works with direct file system access for the most part. Occasionally there have been reports of files getting "stuck" on the D: partition, and requiring manual intervention (remove/replace) to get DE to migrate them to other drives in the storage pool.

    I suspect you'll be okay, because D$ is a share. It's an administrative share, not one that end users will normally connect to, but it is a share.
    Friday, March 14, 2008 1:25 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • An interesting question. I haven't tried it (not a Linux guy) but I can't see where you would have a problem. A share is a share, after all. You probably realize this, but by going to the administrative share that way, you're bypassing all security.
    Thursday, March 13, 2008 3:19 PM
    Moderator
  •  

    That mount command should work.  As Ken states probably best to define a user in WHS to use to mount your shares, rather than expose the Administrator credentials.
    Thursday, March 13, 2008 3:22 PM
  • One other point, is that it is not recommended to directly put files into shared folders through the D drive, and only use the shares that you have created.

     

    Thursday, March 13, 2008 7:42 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Tom!

    I guess that was kind of what I was wondering. I had a feeling there would be this assumption not to do it, but I am trying to figure out WHY that's is.  I can't for the life of me come up with a good reason since this would not normally be an issue with good 'ol Server 2003.


    Keep in mind I don't yet know a lot specifically about Home Server edition so I have to ask what is Home Server doing that makes this otherwise standard procedure a vector of potential problems?  Is it a case that so many people have been "warned" not to do certain things that anyhing out of the norm become a self propagating rumor? 


    I understand the need to keep the product simple to use for novices and avoid liability issues by forcing users to conform to a strict and tested methods of use, but I want to be able to take full advantage of the server without having to worry about unfounded "rumors". 



    Thanks again...I'll keep reading and testing.  I hope to learn more about who the "THEY" are whenever we hear:  "Be careful doing such and such since they say not do it"







    Thursday, March 13, 2008 11:34 PM
  • The recommendation is because WHS Drive Extender is designed to work with network shares. As it happens, it also works with direct file system access for the most part. Occasionally there have been reports of files getting "stuck" on the D: partition, and requiring manual intervention (remove/replace) to get DE to migrate them to other drives in the storage pool.

    I suspect you'll be okay, because D$ is a share. It's an administrative share, not one that end users will normally connect to, but it is a share.
    Friday, March 14, 2008 1:25 AM
    Moderator