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Can't Find Server During Restore RRS feed

  • Question

  • After replacing a hard drive that died in one of my computers, the computer is not able to find the server to do a restore.  I have verified the hardware is good by running Ubuntu's memory and network tests, browsed the web using Ubuntu, and am able to see files on the new hard drive.  However, when I run the restore disk, the computer cannot find the server.  I have copied all drivers from the server on to the computer being rebuilt using a USB flash drive and disconnected the internet per another thread I found here.  I have also tried restoring using both the more than 512 MB of memory and less than 512 MB of memory selections.

    Other computers on the network can find the server at this time and I have previously successfully retored another computer on the same network from the same server.  Any ideas why the computer with the new hard drive can't find the server?

    By the way, the computer has a Intel DP35DP motherboard, a new 500GB HDD to replace a defective 80 GB HDD that was part of an 80 GB RAID (I am no longer using a RAID), and the BIOS settings have been changed to no longer use a RAID.

    Thanks in advance for the help.

    Tuesday, December 22, 2009 6:55 AM

Answers

  • Here is the latest.

    In an attempt to narrow down what is causing my problem, I attempted to reload WinXP as an experiment using the new hard drive.  I got a "IRQ_NOT_LESS_THAN_OR_EQUAL" error part way through the install.  A search of the Microsoft website listed several possible causes, one being a driver trying to access out of bounds memory.  I then reinstalled the original hard drives, one of which is in the process of failing but usually is okay, reset the BIOS to the proper RAID settings, and everything worked fine.  From that I have concluded the problem is caused by trying to change my RAID-based computer to a non_RAID computer.  I was justfying this by the presence of WHS backups.  However, the hassle of saving $60 for a second hard drive is not worth it.  I'm going to buy a second 500GB hard drive to match the one I've been trying to install and leave the computer with a RAID drive C.

    Obviously the resulting system will be more reliable being double redundant and I won't have to figure out how to break the RAID.

    Olaf, thanks for your help,.

    Here is an update posted 3/2/2010.

    As it turns out, installing the second 500GB hard drive and configuring it as a RAID also did not solve the problem.  The problem turned out the be the age of the WinXP distribution disk I was using, version 2002.  Someone suggested a newer version of the XP disk was needed.  I obtained a copy of the WinXP Home Edition with service pack 3, started from scratch, and everything finally installed correctly and worked.  Apparently the distribution drivers on my old XP disk were too out-of-date for my newer Intel motherboard.

    I can now say everything is working.

    Bob
    • Marked as answer by BobMarso Wednesday, December 23, 2009 5:18 PM
    • Edited by BobMarso Wednesday, March 3, 2010 4:14 AM Update to previous post.
    Wednesday, December 23, 2009 5:18 PM

All replies

  • Hi,
    does your router reach out DHCP addresses? Without DHCP server a server will not be found due to lack of a valid address.
    Has the network adapter been detected successfully? (In the router you would see, if an IP address has been reached out to that system).
    What is the DNS server, configured in the DHCP server? Is it the address of the router or something else?
    If you have a second WHS client, you can follow the FAQ How to restore a client PC, if the network connection does not work in the CD based restore environment.

    Be aware, that a RAID based Windows restored to a non RAID disk will usually not boot without performing a repair install (if supported by the OS you are restoring) due to the different mass storage drivers.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Tuesday, December 22, 2009 11:18 AM
    Moderator
  • Olaf,

    Thank you for your help.  Yes, my router is connected (I disconnected it from the internet on the modem side) and has DHCP enabled. Also, the WHS server address is fixed.  As to whether WHS has successfully detected the network adapter, I do not know.  How would I tell?  When the restore program lists detected devices, it does not list any network devices.   Would it detect and report my print server and router?  However, the hardware is defiinitely good since when I boot from a Ubuntu disk I am able to surf the web.

    Does your comment about a repair install mean I need to first install WinXP in the repair mode before I restore the computer as a WHS client?

    Thanks again for the help, from the USA.  (How wonderful the internet!)

    Bob
    Tuesday, December 22, 2009 3:56 PM
  • Here is the latest.

    In an attempt to narrow down what is causing my problem, I attempted to reload WinXP as an experiment using the new hard drive.  I got a "IRQ_NOT_LESS_THAN_OR_EQUAL" error part way through the install.  A search of the Microsoft website listed several possible causes, one being a driver trying to access out of bounds memory.  I then reinstalled the original hard drives, one of which is in the process of failing but usually is okay, reset the BIOS to the proper RAID settings, and everything worked fine.  From that I have concluded the problem is caused by trying to change my RAID-based computer to a non_RAID computer.  I was justfying this by the presence of WHS backups.  However, the hassle of saving $60 for a second hard drive is not worth it.  I'm going to buy a second 500GB hard drive to match the one I've been trying to install and leave the computer with a RAID drive C.

    Obviously the resulting system will be more reliable being double redundant and I won't have to figure out how to break the RAID.

    Olaf, thanks for your help,.

    Here is an update posted 3/2/2010.

    As it turns out, installing the second 500GB hard drive and configuring it as a RAID also did not solve the problem.  The problem turned out the be the age of the WinXP distribution disk I was using, version 2002.  Someone suggested a newer version of the XP disk was needed.  I obtained a copy of the WinXP Home Edition with service pack 3, started from scratch, and everything finally installed correctly and worked.  Apparently the distribution drivers on my old XP disk were too out-of-date for my newer Intel motherboard.

    I can now say everything is working.

    Bob
    • Marked as answer by BobMarso Wednesday, December 23, 2009 5:18 PM
    • Edited by BobMarso Wednesday, March 3, 2010 4:14 AM Update to previous post.
    Wednesday, December 23, 2009 5:18 PM