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CRM 2011 Deployment Design RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi Guys,
    1st question here but I haven't found an explanation and don't have much experience with Dynamics CRM as yet.

    I previously deployed a test system on a single virtual machine with SQL Server installed and AD domain access. I am now deploying a system for user access but will be using an established SQL server. Because of this the Reporting functions are not installed/enabled during the installation.

    On reading parts of the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Planning Guide on page 23 and again on page 51 it says:
    "You must run the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions Setup on a computer that has Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services installed. For smaller data sets and fewer users, you can use either a single-server deployment, or a multiple-server deployment with one computer that is running SQL Server for Microsoft Dynamics CRM, and another server for Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services. With larger datasets or more users, performance will decrease quickly when complex reports are run."

    Does this mean performance of the SQL Server, Reporting Services or CRM will decrease? It is quite ambiguous. If it is the SQL Server overall that suffers I may elect to try running reporting services on the CRM server so the system is largely confined to 1 server. Also in this instance does Reporting Services require another software license of any kind?

    Thanks

    Wednesday, June 13, 2012 8:27 AM

Answers

  • The processing of CRM Reports occurs entirely within SQL Server (queries are written directly against the database in contrast to ALL other CRM interactivity which must be via web services).

    So the statement regarding the performance impact of complex reports will be referring to the SQL Server and/or Report Server, not the CRM Server.

    Whether the performance impact affects the SQL Server, Report Server (if it exists on another instance/machine) or both will depend on where in the Report(s) the complexity exists.

    If the SQL query that generates the report datasets is complex, the impact will be on the (CRM) SQL Server; if the layout is complex (grouping/sub-reports/scripted calculations etc), the impact will be on the Report Server.  Large datasets will likely affect both, but more-so the Report Server as rendering requirements increase with the volume of data.

    Impacts, if any on the SQL Server (in which the CRM DB is hosted) can be mitigated by maintaining the database properly (Index Maintenance) and the creation of additional indexes where necessary and/or appropriate.


    --pogo (pat) @ pogo69.wordpress.com

    • Marked as answer by R-X Thursday, June 14, 2012 11:52 PM
    Thursday, June 14, 2012 1:07 AM

All replies

  • Hi R-X,

    if u have already an SQL 2008 Server i would suggest you to install the Reporting Feature of SQL 2008 and configure it. If you are going to install CRM 2001 on the same Server where the SQL 2008 is installed you only need to install after the CRM Installation the SRS Connector. You will be asked after the CRM installion for it, else you can find the installation files in the CRM installation folder.

    This Server should be enough for testing and a few users. If you plan to have in future alot more users then you should think about to install Microsof CRM 2011 because of the performance on a own server. This will nothing change about the reports. Those are still run on the SQL 2008. Only thing u should not forget is to install the SRS connector on the SQL Server not the CRM.

    Hope this helps, if u have more questions just ask :)

    Wednesday, June 13, 2012 1:19 PM
  • Hi Hurrikane1982,

    Thanks for the response. I have already installed CRM2011 on its own server and we have an established SQL server which hosts several other production databases. I am mainly concerned about the last sentence "With larger datasets or more users, performance will decrease quickly when complex reports are run." because I don't want to impact performance on the existing SQL server.

    The statement above doesn't make it clear which system performance will "decrease quickly when complex reports are run.". Would performance decrease quickly on the SQL server, where SSRS is installed or where CRM is installed?

    Thanks

    Thursday, June 14, 2012 12:00 AM
  • The processing of CRM Reports occurs entirely within SQL Server (queries are written directly against the database in contrast to ALL other CRM interactivity which must be via web services).

    So the statement regarding the performance impact of complex reports will be referring to the SQL Server and/or Report Server, not the CRM Server.

    Whether the performance impact affects the SQL Server, Report Server (if it exists on another instance/machine) or both will depend on where in the Report(s) the complexity exists.

    If the SQL query that generates the report datasets is complex, the impact will be on the (CRM) SQL Server; if the layout is complex (grouping/sub-reports/scripted calculations etc), the impact will be on the Report Server.  Large datasets will likely affect both, but more-so the Report Server as rendering requirements increase with the volume of data.

    Impacts, if any on the SQL Server (in which the CRM DB is hosted) can be mitigated by maintaining the database properly (Index Maintenance) and the creation of additional indexes where necessary and/or appropriate.


    --pogo (pat) @ pogo69.wordpress.com

    • Marked as answer by R-X Thursday, June 14, 2012 11:52 PM
    Thursday, June 14, 2012 1:07 AM
  • Thanks pogo69,

    That's the sort of thing I was after. At least now there's something searchable on the net if anybody else wonders :)

    Thursday, June 14, 2012 11:51 PM