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Product Key check required. RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

     

    I have recently bought an OEM version of Windows 7 in the UK.  I believe a genuine OEM licence would be appropriate as I am looking to install this on a PC for resale to a customer, whom I will offer support to.

     

    However, the product I have received does not look like OEM products I have received in the past.  It does not include a COA, and the product key is just printed on plain orange paper, with no other wording or Microsoft logos.  The vendor has become quite aggressive and has tried to explain with the following examples:

     

    COA is not a legal requirement inside the EU. You are fully legally licensed.”

     

    The old disks before Service Pack 1 had a holographic ring on the outer edge. You got one of the new disks with Service Pack 1 on the disk. This is a standard Microsoft OEM disk, it is fully legal and there is no good reason to find fault. You also got the best price in the UK.”

     

    COA is proof of nothing - the world is flooded with counterfeit COAs. Product keys on those fake COAs cannot be activated by Microsoft. The product key you received can be activated by Microsoft, this is proof that the product key is genuine.

     

    The fact that the product key can be activated by Microsoft proves beyond any doubt that it is genuine.”

     

    He is also refusing to refund me as per my rights under the UK Distance Selling Regulations.  He claims as I opened an opaque white envelope with the product inside I have “unsealed” the software.

     

    Bottom line is this:  Can I provide someone here the key he has supplied me with to see if it is genuine or not (perhaps it is an MSDN one, although he claims it's not.  I'm not sure what other counterfeit keys exist.)?  I have not opened the disc packaging, tried to install it or used the product key in anyway as I have my suspicions (so I can't run any reports, all I can do is provide the key).

     

    Let me know and I can supply the product key by e-mail or PM, obviously I haven't posted it here.

     

    Many thanks.

    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 1:35 PM

Answers

  • This is an OEM COA product key. 

    Windows Product ID Type: 8
    Windows License Type: COA SLP

    It is only valid if the COA sticker is affixed to the computer the software was installed on by the original equipment manufacturer.  It is not valid if removed from that computer and used on another, which would be the case here.  This is the product key that is used when the embedded key in a Type 2 OEM SLP license fails.  It is not intended for an original installation but as a backup key.  The SLP technology is only used by major manufacturers who have royalty licenses for Windows.

    Get your money back and don't deal with this distributor again if he refuses.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, October 27, 2011 10:19 PM
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 9:12 PM
    Answerer
  • Yes indeed, the Windows 7 license certainly appears to be counterfeit!
    Carey Frisch
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, October 27, 2011 10:19 PM
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 9:21 PM
    Moderator
  • Okay, thanks for the info.

    The distributor claims it is legitimate and is not playing ball with regards to a refund.  I will have to escalate this to Google Checkout or my credit card company for mediation.

    Whilst I really appreciate all the feedback here, what would be the best way to get someone from Microsoft to confirm this product shouldn't have been sold to me?  I e-mailed piracy@microsoft.com the other day, but received an e-mail stating they no longer monitor that address.

    Thanks again!

    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, October 27, 2011 10:19 PM
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 10:09 PM

All replies

  • The world is not flooded with counterfeit COAs.  The world is flooded with counterfeit copies of the Microsoft package.  The COAs in the packages are genuine and the product keys do activate.  The problem is that the product keys are MSDN not-for-resale product keys from fraudulently obtained subscriptions.  These counterfeit copies do contain genuine product keys.  However, as soon as enough copies using the same product key are activated Microsoft detects the abuse and blocks them (but it takes time).  These are produced in China on sophisticated equipment.

    My question for your supplier is Why does he feel the need to use scraps of paper?

    I suggest you install one and run the MGADiag report as described in announcement 1 above.  The report will mask the first two fields of five characters in the product key, but that is sufficient for Darin Smith to check for you.  Darin drops by from time to time.  Under no circumstances print the full product key.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 3:11 PM
    Answerer
  • In addition to Colin's comments you might find this link useful:

     

    http://www.microsoft.com/OEM/en/licensing/antipiracy/Pages/COA_hologram.aspx

    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 3:21 PM
    Answerer
  • Thanks for the info.  I suspected an MSDN key was involved, but the reseller denies this (surprise, surprise).

    I had hoped not to use the key, as I felt I wouldn't be able to return it, but I don't think that's the issue now!  I will try the key tonight.  In fact, as I have legitimate access to MSDN, I will download the Windows 7 Home Premium ISO and install it.  Presumably if the key he has given me works on that then it is an MSDN key, as genuine OEM keys presumably wouldn't work with an MSDN ISO?

    Either way, I'll post the results of MGADiag and we'll take it from there.

    Thanks again!

    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 3:24 PM
  • Just typing the key of an already opened package can't make a difference.  Just do it.

    "I suspected an MSDN key was involved,"

    I disagree.  I do not suspect an MSDN key.  The MSDN scam concerns retail boxes.

    I expect that the key will prove to be Type 3 System Builder. 

    "Presumably if the key he has given me works on that then it is an MSDN key, as genuine OEM keys presumably wouldn't work with an MSDN ISO?"

    No, a System Builder .iso is not different from a retail .iso, which is what MSDN uses.  You will have no trouble using the key to install.  You cannot tell what you have by whether or not the key is accepted when using SB media.  You need to print the MGADiag report and then we can tell.

    I suspect that this whole issue will come down to whether or not you have the right to reasonably expect an OEM System Builder pack to reach you in factory condition.  You certainly have the right to provide a proper COA to your customers whether legally required to or not.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 3:35 PM
    Answerer
  • One more thing.  Presumably if I install this into a virtual machine it won't affect the activation process or the MGADiag?  I'd rather keep the whole thing sandboxed.
    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 3:42 PM
  • It makes no difference.  Anyway, don't activate it.  Just install and run the report.  Activation is not needed and since it is an OEM license you don't want to activate.  Be sure to uncheck the box that says "activate when I get online". 
    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 3:55 PM
    Answerer
  • Okay, understood.  Thanks for all the info.
    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 4:04 PM
  • Okay, so here is the output:

     

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 0
    Cached Online Validation Code: N/A, hr = 0xc004f012
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-G22Y4-WYYD7-P6BHT
    Windows Product Key Hash: avNj4t7jY1fgwBYPo8JvCMsR6V4=
    Windows Product ID: 00359-OEM-9815633-01586
    Windows Product ID Type: 8
    Windows License Type: COA SLP
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7601.2.00010300.1.0.003
    ID: {D6FB19D5-4283-40B8-9E0D-55403DC30B68}(1)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Product Name: Windows 7 Home Premium
    Architecture: 0x00000009
    Build lab: 7601.win7sp1_rtm.101119-1850
    TTS Error:
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Vista WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109 N/A
    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: 025D1FF3-364-80041010_025D1FF3-229-80041010_025D1FF3-230-1_025D1FF3-517-80040154_025D1FF3-237-80040154_025D1FF3-238-2_025D1FF3-244-80070002_025D1FF3-258-3

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files (x86)\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->
    File Mismatch: C:\Windows\system32\wat\watadminsvc.exe[Hr = 0x80070003]
    File Mismatch: C:\Windows\system32\wat\npwatweb.dll[Hr = 0x80070003]
    File Mismatch: C:\Windows\system32\wat\watux.exe[Hr = 0x80070003]
    File Mismatch: C:\Windows\system32\wat\watweb.dll[Hr = 0x80070003]

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{D6FB19D5-4283-40B8-9E0D-55403DC30B68}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>6.1.7601.2.00010300.1.0.003</OS><Architecture>x64</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-P6BHT</PKey><PID>00359-OEM-9815633-01586</PID><PIDType>8</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-291407802-2092079974-672987398</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>innotek GmbH</Manufacturer><Model>VirtualBox</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>innotek GmbH</Manufacturer><Version>VirtualBox</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="5"/><Date>20061201000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>C1783A07018400FE</HWID><UserLCID>0809</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>GMT Standard Time(GMT+00:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/><GANotification/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/><Applications/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Spsys.log Content: 0x80070002

    Licensing Data-->
    Software licensing service version: 6.1.7601.17514

    Name: Windows(R) 7, HomePremium edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, OEM_COA_SLP channel
    Activation ID: 5e017a8a-f3f9-4167-b1bd-ba3e236a4d8f
    Application ID: 55c92734-d682-4d71-983e-d6ec3f16059f
    Extended PID: 00359-00196-156-301586-02-2057-7601.0000-3002011
    Installation ID: 004420205194447031514635144776582750339416319642838803
    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88338
    Machine Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88339
    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88341
    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340
    Partial Product Key: P6BHT
    License Status: Initial grace period
    Time remaining: 43200 minute(s) (30 day(s))
    Remaining Windows rearm count: 3
    Trusted time: 27/10/2011 21:52:36

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    HrOffline: 0x00000000
    HrOnline: N/A
    HealthStatus: 0x0000000000000000
    Event Time Stamp: N/A
    ActiveX: Not Registered - 0x80040154
    Admin Service: Not Registered - 0x80040154
    HealthStatus Bitmask Output:


    HWID Data-->
    HWID Hash Current: MAAAAAEABAABAAEAAAABAAAAAQABAAEA6GGc4ryt5rf+2yRmBgwyg3bodvlwAWZm

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes, but no SLIC table
    Windows marker version: N/A
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: N/A
    BIOS Information:
      ACPI Table Name OEMID Value OEMTableID Value
      APIC   VBOX    VBOXAPIC
      FACP   VBOX    VBOXFACP
      SSDT   VBOX    VBOXCPUT

     

    Thursday, October 27, 2011 8:58 PM
  • Unfortunately, the installed OEM SLP copy of Windows 7 was designed only to be installed on a specific OEM manufactured PC.  It cannot be used in a virtual machine setup.
    Carey Frisch
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 9:10 PM
    Moderator
  • This is an OEM COA product key. 

    Windows Product ID Type: 8
    Windows License Type: COA SLP

    It is only valid if the COA sticker is affixed to the computer the software was installed on by the original equipment manufacturer.  It is not valid if removed from that computer and used on another, which would be the case here.  This is the product key that is used when the embedded key in a Type 2 OEM SLP license fails.  It is not intended for an original installation but as a backup key.  The SLP technology is only used by major manufacturers who have royalty licenses for Windows.

    Get your money back and don't deal with this distributor again if he refuses.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, October 27, 2011 10:19 PM
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 9:12 PM
    Answerer
  • Carey, please try to keep up.

    He isn't planning to use the software in a vm.  He just installed it in one so we could take a look at the license type.  That is clearly wrong for an OEM System Builder license which the distributor claimed it was.  He builds and sells computers.  Reread the thread.  He has been sold bad product.  That was what he wanted to know.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 9:18 PM
    Answerer
  • Yes indeed, the Windows 7 license certainly appears to be counterfeit!
    Carey Frisch
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, October 27, 2011 10:19 PM
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 9:21 PM
    Moderator
  • Okay, thanks for the info.

    The distributor claims it is legitimate and is not playing ball with regards to a refund.  I will have to escalate this to Google Checkout or my credit card company for mediation.

    Whilst I really appreciate all the feedback here, what would be the best way to get someone from Microsoft to confirm this product shouldn't have been sold to me?  I e-mailed piracy@microsoft.com the other day, but received an e-mail stating they no longer monitor that address.

    Thanks again!

    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, October 27, 2011 10:19 PM
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 10:09 PM
  • Contact the Microsoft office in your region.  They are conversant in the legalities of things like this.  No one, not even a Microsoft employee, can make a binding (official) statement in a forum.  Your rationale for wanting your money back is that you recieved goods that were not as advertised.  Unless, of course, the seller stated ahead of time that there would be no COA.
    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 10:25 PM
    Answerer
  • Please feel free to submit a confidential Counterfeit Software Report.
    Carey Frisch
    Friday, October 28, 2011 12:00 AM
    Moderator