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Yet another key become invalid RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I brought an OEM copy of Windows XP Pro with the parts to build a computer a couple of years ago. It has worked perfectly up to today. I am now told that the key is invalid and that I have a counterfeit copy.

    I have run through all the steps outlined in the "valudation" thread. But still no go.

    The partial key code listed isn't any of the SIX XP Pro that I have (legally) brought, it isn't even close.

    Here is the output of MGADiag.exe

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0011.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    WGA Data-->
    Validation Status: Geographically blocked PID
    Validation Code: 13

    Cached Validation Code: N/A
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-2487J-KWKMF-RPWBY
    Windows Product Key Hash: A6tqZpYlrSkfmUWcaNDswSdRpOo=
    Windows Product ID: 55274-640-8834005-23656
    Windows Product ID Type: 1
    Windows License Type: Volume
    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro
    ID: {ABF47038-E86B-4B74-B71F-EFDAE6A5EF58}(3)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    WGA Version: Registered, 1.9.40.0
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Product Name: N/A
    Architecture: N/A
    Build lab: N/A
    TTS Error: N/A
    Validation Diagnostic: 025D1FF3-230-1
    Resolution Status: N/A

    WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A
    Version: N/A

    WGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: 13
    File Exists: Yes
    Version: 1.9.40.0
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: Microsoft
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: Microsoft

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109 N/A
    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: 025D1FF3-230-1

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files\Mozilla Firefox\firefox.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{ABF47038-E86B-4B74-B71F-EFDAE6A5EF58}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0011.0</Version><OS>5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro</OS><Architecture>x32</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-RPWBY</PKey><PID>55274-640-8834005-23656</PID><PIDType>1</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-1123561945-562591055-839522115</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>NVIDIA</Manufacturer><Model>122-CK-NF68</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Phoenix Technologies, LTD</Manufacturer><Version>6.00 PG</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="4"/><Date>20061221000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>AC3E38170184807A</HWID><UserLCID>0809</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>GMT Standard Time(GMT+00:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/><GANotification><File Name="WgaTray.exe" Version="1.9.40.0"/><File Name="WgaLogon.dll" Version="1.9.40.0"/></GANotification></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/><Applications/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Licensing Data-->
    N/A

    HWID Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    BIOS string matches: no
    Marker string from BIOS: N/A
    Marker string from OEMBIOS.DAT: N/A, hr = 0x80004005

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    N/A

    As a customer that buys legal copies of Windows - I have 6 x XP Pro, 2 x Vista Home Premium, and a MCE 2005 - this is REALLY annoying
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 9:24 PM

Answers

  • Hello StreetSam,

    Since the PK Updater method isn't going to work out, let's examine the CDs you have.

    Let's establish what kind of XP license the CD is claiming to be.  If as you mentioned these are supposed to be OEM licenses, then you should have received these components shrink-wrapped together:  (1) a genuine Microsoft hologrammed CD with XP Pro in a plain while CD envelope; (2) a thin blue XP pro User's Guide pamphlet; and (3) a genuine Certificate of Authenticity (CoA) affixed to a peel-off base label itself affixed to the outer surface of the shrink wrap.

    The CD should have "For distribution with a new PC only" plus wording about getting support from the PC manufacturer in the upper left quadrant of the label.  The hologrammed label should be embedded within the plastic of the CD and should not be a think label affixed to the top surface of the CD.

    The pamphet should have no misspellings.  Quite often the counterfeit pamphlets have some misspellings.

    The CoA labels have changed over the years, but most should have the security thread going thru an open porthole.  See examples of good and counterfeit CDs and CoAs at http://www.microsoft.com/howtotell/content.aspx

    Insert the CD into the computer and navigate to the \i386 folder, the look for the setupp.ini file, which is a small text file with two sections.  Please paste the second section (Pid=) into your reply.
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Friday, July 17, 2009 2:08 PM

All replies

  • You may have "legally bought" your copy of Windows XP Professional, but regrettably it is not-genuine.

    From your MGA report:

    Windows License Type: Volume

    Validation Status: Geographically blocked PID

    If you Google the partial product key, you'll see that the product key is counterfeit and posted all over the 'net.

    To sum up, your installed copy of Windows XP Professional is not an OEM version.  It is a Volume License version
    using a counterfeit product key that has been blocked by Microsoft because they did not issue it.

    To resolve your non-genuine licensing issue, visit Genuine Microsoft Software and click on "Validate Windows".
    After validation fails, click on the "Get Genuine" button to review your options, which include how to acquire a WGA Kit.

    Carey Frisch
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 11:16 PM
    Moderator
  • Hello Street Sam,

    Assuming the computer that generated the report above is one of the six, here's an idea:

    1.  Run the mgadiag utility on all six computers.

    2.  Match the Product Keys reported in the mgadiag report for each computer to the Product Key printed on that computer's Certificate of Authenticity.

    3.  You "should" end up with five computers each showing "OEM systembuilder" as the license type, and having the PK printed on its CoA actually installed on the computer.

    4.  The sixth computer, the one that generated the report above, will have a PK on its CoA that is nowhere close to what is being reported.

    5.  On this computer, run the PK Updater Utility http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=45668, and use the PK on its CoA to update/change the above blocked PK to the real PK on its CoA.

    6.  When the PK Updater is done its work, restart and rerun the mgadiag utility.  The computer should now report that the PK on its CoA is now installed and the license type has been changed to "OEM systembuilder."

    Let us know if that works out or not.
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Friday, July 17, 2009 3:30 AM
  • You may have "legally bought" your copy of Windows XP Professional, but regrettably it is not-genuine.

    From your MGA report:

    Windows License Type: Volume

    Validation Status: Geographically blocked PID

    If you Google the partial product key , you'll see that the product key is counterfeit and posted all over the 'net.

    To sum up, your installed copy of Windows XP Professional is not an OEM version.  It is a Volume License version
    using a counterfeit product key that has been blocked by Microsoft because they did not issue it.

    To resolve your non-genuine licensing issue, visit Genuine Microsoft Software  and click on "Validate Windows".
    After validation fails, click on the "Get Genuine " button to review your options, which include how to acquire a WGA Kit .

    Carey Frisch

    This is what happens when a company has a monopoly. They fail to listen to even their most honest customers, they just assume that all of them are crooks and liars.
    Just so you know Mr Frisch your reply sounds, to me, like you are calling me a liar.

    Just so you understand, the copy of Windows on this machine was brought from a large well known retailer in the UK. Second and most important, WHY WOULD I USE A PIRATE KEY WHEN I HAVE A LEGAL ONE, this is the point of my original post. Why would I come to a MIcrosoft forum and complain that my pirated copy of Windows doesn't work, I'd have to be a moron to do that. What I would like help with is finding out why my product key has changed to the pirate one, and how to change it back.
    Friday, July 17, 2009 9:42 AM
  • 1.  Run the mgadiag utility on all six computers.

    2.  Match the Product Keys reported in the mgadiag report for each computer to the Product Key printed on that computer's Certificate of Authenticity.

    3.  You "should" end up with five computers each showing "OEM systembuilder" as the license type, and having the PK printed on its CoA actually installed on the computer.

    4.  The sixth computer, the one that generated the report above, will have a PK on its CoA that is nowhere close to what is being reported.

    5.  On this computer, run the PK Updater Utility http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=45668 , and use the PK on its CoA to update/change the above blocked PK to the real PK on its CoA.

    Thanks for the advice, I was thinking I'd have to do that. I have now sorted out which key goes with which computer, however when I try to use the product key in the updater it tells me the number isn't valid for that product.
    Friday, July 17, 2009 10:08 AM
  • Apparently, the retailer unwittingly acquired the non-genuine copy of Windows XP.  Print a copy of your MGA report and show it to the retailer.
    The most common conterfeiters use a Volume License CD and an illegal product key generator, then package their product with OEM labeling.

    How to Tell: http://www.microsoft.com/howtotell/content.aspx
    Carey Frisch
    Friday, July 17, 2009 1:14 PM
    Moderator
  • Hello StreetSam,

    Since the PK Updater method isn't going to work out, let's examine the CDs you have.

    Let's establish what kind of XP license the CD is claiming to be.  If as you mentioned these are supposed to be OEM licenses, then you should have received these components shrink-wrapped together:  (1) a genuine Microsoft hologrammed CD with XP Pro in a plain while CD envelope; (2) a thin blue XP pro User's Guide pamphlet; and (3) a genuine Certificate of Authenticity (CoA) affixed to a peel-off base label itself affixed to the outer surface of the shrink wrap.

    The CD should have "For distribution with a new PC only" plus wording about getting support from the PC manufacturer in the upper left quadrant of the label.  The hologrammed label should be embedded within the plastic of the CD and should not be a think label affixed to the top surface of the CD.

    The pamphet should have no misspellings.  Quite often the counterfeit pamphlets have some misspellings.

    The CoA labels have changed over the years, but most should have the security thread going thru an open porthole.  See examples of good and counterfeit CDs and CoAs at http://www.microsoft.com/howtotell/content.aspx

    Insert the CD into the computer and navigate to the \i386 folder, the look for the setupp.ini file, which is a small text file with two sections.  Please paste the second section (Pid=) into your reply.
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Friday, July 17, 2009 2:08 PM