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How do I manually start a client incremental backup? RRS feed

  • Question

  • How do I manually kick-off an incremental backup?

     

    I often shutdown at night when my backup is scheduled.  Since the incrementals are usually short, I would like to be able to manually kick-off an incremental backup or the next scheduled incremental backup.  Note - this is different than manually starting either a full backup or a backup of selected files and folders.

    Friday, May 9, 2008 12:28 AM

Answers

  • First, Windows Home Server only does one kind of backup. In appearance, it's a full backup every time. In reality it's more like an incremental backup.

    To answer your question: You right click the Windows Home Server icon in the system tray, and select "Backup Now..."
    Friday, May 9, 2008 12:57 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Mike,

     

     Mike Fish wrote:

    Hello Colin & Ken

    Thanks as ever for your help, but to just clarify for this newbie, the connector (to which I have added the fix) will recognise corrupted files in the back ups done previously and therefore back them up again correctly?  If so it should be just as simple as making a note somewhere of the date I applied the fix as back ups from then on should be good.  Is that right?

    Mike

     

    I have little new to add to the answers from ColinWH and Ken that followed your question above, but I thought I'd throw in my own version, based on the "to be sure to be sure" checks that I made for my own feel-good after I applied the KB950190 fix.

     

    While waiting for this fix, and so that I could confirm and celebrate that it actually worked (no disrespect implied, naturally) I deliberately held onto and continued to backup a compressed NTFS folder containing a couple of files which I knew had suffered from the bug.

     

    Anyway, here's my summary of my existing and future backups:

     

    • As we know - prior to bugfix KB950190, a WHS-backed-up copy of an NTFS compressed file might be corrupted during the backup process. The original file on the Client PC was never affected.
    • If a compressed file was corrupted during a WHS backup prior to KB950190 being installed on the Client then the same file would be identically corrupted in all WHS backups made without the KB950190 fix.
    • The corruption remains even if the file is restored AFTER KB950190 is installed on the Client. In other words, KB950190 does not fix those rare faulty files retrospectively.
    • AFTER KB950190 is installed on a Client PC, a compressed file that previously suffered this corruption is now backed up OK, and can be restored perfectly.

    Note that there's no need to delete any previous backups made prior to KB950190, because within those backups, there is NO doubt that all files which were not originally flagged by NTFS as compressed, are in perfectly good health!

     

    I'm now happily re-compressing those PC's folders which I'd uncompressed to avoid this problem :-)

     

    Regards,

    Colin

    Friday, May 9, 2008 7:41 PM

All replies

  • First, Windows Home Server only does one kind of backup. In appearance, it's a full backup every time. In reality it's more like an incremental backup.

    To answer your question: You right click the Windows Home Server icon in the system tray, and select "Backup Now..."
    Friday, May 9, 2008 12:57 AM
    Moderator
  • This is interesting.  So if I have installed the fix for the missing bytes bug It is logical to assume I need to do a full backup.  How do I force a full backup?

     

    Mike

    Friday, May 9, 2008 6:05 AM
  • The only way, would be to delete all backups for that client from the server, which can be done with the Toolkit.

    Even then, in theory you wouldn't get a full backup, as WHS will still compare what it's going to backup from that client to any other backups in the database of other clients and not duplicate any files it finds in common.

    I would guess the only way to be absolutely sure, once the 'fix' is out, is to remove ALL backups for ALL clients and then start again.

    At least, that's what I intend doing for my servers, after I've copied off a set of backups for each set of clients.

     

    Colin

     

    Friday, May 9, 2008 11:16 AM
  • The only reason to do an initial backup (let's call it that, you only ever get one true full backup per Windows Home Server installation) after you've installed that fix would be to delete all backups for a PC then run the cleanup wizard. But there should be no need to reset a PC and do an initial backup, unless you want to get rid of all backups with potentially corrupted files just so you won't use them. The connector should correctly back up any files that were previously subject to the issue.
    Friday, May 9, 2008 11:34 AM
    Moderator
  •  

    Hello Colin & Ken

     

    Thanks as ever for your help, but to just clarify for this newbie, the connector (to which I have added the fix) will recognise corrupted files in the back ups done previously and therefore back them up again correctly?  If so it should be just as simple as making a note somewhere of the date I applied the fix as back ups from then on should be good.  Is that right?

     

    Mike

    Friday, May 9, 2008 2:27 PM
  • Mike,

    There's certainly no reason why that shouldn't work. The easiest way to do that, would be run a manual backup, but name it something like 'After the Fix'. Manual backups are usually marked as not for deletion anyway.

    If your really concerned, you could try a client restore, if you have a spare hard drive.

     

    Colin

     

     

    Friday, May 9, 2008 4:47 PM
  • It's not that the connector will recognize that the file was previously corrupt in the backup, it's that it will see the file in a different fashion, and so will back up what it thinks has changed.

    Simply doing a manual backup and giving it a meaningful name would undoubtedly be sufficient.
    Friday, May 9, 2008 5:19 PM
    Moderator
  •  Ken Warren wrote:
    First, Windows Home Server only does one kind of backup. In appearance, it's a full backup every time. In reality it's more like an incremental backup.
    To answer your question: You right click the Windows Home Server icon in the system tray, and select "Backup Now..."

     

    To Ray Ares, the OP, it's true - as Ken says - that every backup after the first one is a form of incremental backup, but regarding your main point about how to manually trigger a backup that will become a normal backup, and which will become a substitute in all respects for the automatically managed backup that would have occurred if only WHS had been running and 'live' during your normally scheduled backup window ...

     

    I have wanted to do the very same thing many times!  But AFAIK there's only one way to achieve this, and Ken's answer is only the first step towards this end.  And inconveniently, it needs to be done individually for each PC.

     

    Ken's tip of right-clicking the Windows Home Server icon in the system tray, and selecting "Backup Now..." will, as you'll guess - trigger a backup that's flagged as a "Manual" backup in the Console.

     

    But (and here's the less convenient bit), once the backup has finished, and at any time before your WHS triggers its next automatic backup, you can pop into the WHS Console, highlight that Manual backup and change its "Manage Backup From:" radio button to "Manage automatically" instead of "Keep this backup".

     

    As far as I can tell (and I'd be happy to be corrected) WHS will now treat that backup as a 'normal' automated backup as though it had triggered it itself.  I don't know exactly what happens if you change a backup's "Manage automatically" radio button after WHS has run its next automated backup, or if it gets two backups with the exact same date, but I'll bet it'll be no problem at all, and they'll just shuffle along in their backup time slots and fall into the 'discard' bin when their time comes.

     

    I'll guess you already know all this, and that you hoped (like me) for a slicker solution, but - as far as I know - this is our only option.  Maybe post a suggestion on the Connect site ... ?

     

    Regards,

    Colin P.

    Friday, May 9, 2008 7:12 PM
  • You can change the backup status, Manage/Keep/Delete, at any time they are listed in the database; you don't have to ensure it's before the next automatic backup, also, you can run manual backups as often as you like, WHS keeps track of times etc.

    Of course, you can also follow the instructions in the Tech Brief to export your backups to another drive altogether and still let WHS manage the backups itself.

     

    Colin

    Friday, May 9, 2008 7:31 PM
  • Hi Mike,

     

     Mike Fish wrote:

    Hello Colin & Ken

    Thanks as ever for your help, but to just clarify for this newbie, the connector (to which I have added the fix) will recognise corrupted files in the back ups done previously and therefore back them up again correctly?  If so it should be just as simple as making a note somewhere of the date I applied the fix as back ups from then on should be good.  Is that right?

    Mike

     

    I have little new to add to the answers from ColinWH and Ken that followed your question above, but I thought I'd throw in my own version, based on the "to be sure to be sure" checks that I made for my own feel-good after I applied the KB950190 fix.

     

    While waiting for this fix, and so that I could confirm and celebrate that it actually worked (no disrespect implied, naturally) I deliberately held onto and continued to backup a compressed NTFS folder containing a couple of files which I knew had suffered from the bug.

     

    Anyway, here's my summary of my existing and future backups:

     

    • As we know - prior to bugfix KB950190, a WHS-backed-up copy of an NTFS compressed file might be corrupted during the backup process. The original file on the Client PC was never affected.
    • If a compressed file was corrupted during a WHS backup prior to KB950190 being installed on the Client then the same file would be identically corrupted in all WHS backups made without the KB950190 fix.
    • The corruption remains even if the file is restored AFTER KB950190 is installed on the Client. In other words, KB950190 does not fix those rare faulty files retrospectively.
    • AFTER KB950190 is installed on a Client PC, a compressed file that previously suffered this corruption is now backed up OK, and can be restored perfectly.

    Note that there's no need to delete any previous backups made prior to KB950190, because within those backups, there is NO doubt that all files which were not originally flagged by NTFS as compressed, are in perfectly good health!

     

    I'm now happily re-compressing those PC's folders which I'd uncompressed to avoid this problem :-)

     

    Regards,

    Colin

    Friday, May 9, 2008 7:41 PM
  •  Ken Warren wrote:
    It's not that the connector will recognize that the file was previously corrupt in the backup, it's that it will see the file in a different fashion, and so will back up what it thinks has changed.

    Simply doing a manual backup and giving it a meaningful name would undoubtedly be sufficient.

     

    Thanks Ken, that is clear now.

    Friday, May 9, 2008 7:58 PM
  •  ColinWH wrote:

    Mike,

    There's certainly no reason why that shouldn't work. The easiest way to do that, would be run a manual backup, but name it something like 'After the Fix'. Manual backups are usually marked as not for deletion anyway.

    If your really concerned, you could try a client restore, if you have a spare hard drive.

     

    Thanks Colin, I'll do just that.

     

     

    Friday, May 9, 2008 8:00 PM
  • Hey Colin (CSPea)

     

    Thanks for taking the time to give such a comprehensive response.  I think I know what I'm doing now.

     

    Mike

     

     

    Friday, May 9, 2008 8:02 PM