locked
Not happy being advised that My Windows & is not a legal copy RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have also been using Windows 7 Ultimate for some 21 months after updating my desk top computer, receiving all updates and Service Pack from Microsoft and having checked it's authenticity with them at every opportunity am totally surprised  to now (within the past week) find my screen in black with continued reminders that my copy is now deemed, by Microft incidentally, as 'not being legal'

    They do not make it easy to have constructive dialogue with them, pronounce themselves as Judge, Jury and Executioners.

    Whilst understanding that they may not currently wish to offer free updates, I find it somewhat arrogant of them to change the appearance of my computer screen.

    If,  in good faith,  I bought a Rolex, which their dealer eventually decided was not fully legal, he could decline to service it for me but would not be allowed to paint the face black and stick 'illegal' notices all over it.

    We need help here from Microsoft and not the 'heavy hand'. It is too late to obtain recompense from the seller of the item and having openly registered the copy and received updates from Microsoft for some 21 months they cannot hold the final customer totally resposible for their own inadequecies.

    How can I be sure that my copy actually is an illegal copy as they have currently decided?

    My diagnostic report is shown below - where do I go from here?

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 50
    Cached Online Validation Code: 0xc004c4a2
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-6D42K-4PXPH-3BGH6
    Windows Product Key Hash: XIsHW19n36+QsR2Qq528XuqmlLY=
    Windows Product ID: 00426-068-2341641-86287
    Windows Product ID Type: 5
    Windows License Type: Retail
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7601.2.00010100.1.0.001
    ID: {2F94E933-DC67-4AA1-A904-231CA7CD1AD7}(3)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Product Name: Windows 7 Ultimate
    Architecture: 0x00000009
    Build lab: 7601.win7sp1_gdr.120503-2030
    TTS Error:
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Vista WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109 N/A
    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: 025D1FF3-364-80041010_025D1FF3-229-80041010_025D1FF3-230-1_025D1FF3-517-80040154_025D1FF3-237-80040154_025D1FF3-238-2_025D1FF3-244-80070002_025D1FF3-258-3

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files (x86)\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{2F94E933-DC67-4AA1-A904-231CA7CD1AD7}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>6.1.7601.2.00010100.1.0.001</OS><Architecture>x64</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-3BGH6</PKey><PID>00426-068-2341641-86287</PID><PIDType>5</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-3225498928-372749618-2087184748</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>BIOSTAR Group</Manufacturer><Model>A780L M2L+</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>American Megatrends Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>080014 </Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="5"/><Date>20090929000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>F4363E07018400F8</HWID><UserLCID>0809</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>GMT Standard Time(GMT+00:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/><GANotification/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/><Applications/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Spsys.log Content: 0x80070002

    Licensing Data-->
    Software licensing service version: 6.1.7601.17514

    Name: Windows(R) 7, Ultimate edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, RETAIL channel
    Activation ID: a0cde89c-3304-4157-b61c-c8ad785d1fad
    Application ID: 55c92734-d682-4d71-983e-d6ec3f16059f
    Extended PID: 00426-00172-068-234164-00-2057-7601.0000-2032012
    Installation ID: 013775142395011784079611642991646455833660166410346266
    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88338
    Machine Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88339
    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88341
    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340
    Partial Product Key: 3BGH6
    License Status: Notification
    Notification Reason: 0xC004F200 (non-genuine).
    Remaining Windows rearm count: 4
    Trusted time: 04/08/2012 14:49:37

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    HrOffline: 0x00000000
    HrOnline: 0xC004C4A2
    HealthStatus: 0x0000000000000000
    Event Time Stamp: 7:20:2012 15:22
    ActiveX: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    Admin Service: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    HealthStatus Bitmask Output:


    HWID Data-->
    HWID Hash Current: NgAAAAEABAABAAEAAAACAAAAAwABAAEA6GG0Th7HVPLC6FgaEDPgWCIz6kVSgEQtqQXbRsj0

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes, but no SLIC table
    Windows marker version: N/A
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: N/A
    BIOS Information:
      ACPI Table Name OEMID Value OEMTableID Value
      APIC   092909  APIC1105
      FACP   092909  FACP1105
      HPET   092909  OEMHPET
      MCFG   092909  OEMMCFG
      OEMB   092909  OEMB1105
      SSDT   A M I   POWERNOW


    • Edited by bemmoe Saturday, August 4, 2012 2:17 PM
    Saturday, August 4, 2012 2:14 PM

Answers

  • The Key in use is an MSDN Key. Unless you are an MSDN subscriber, you are not entitled to use the Key – and whoever sold it to you was not entitled to do so.  Your Windows Key is from a not-for-resale MSDN account.  You need to claim an immediate refund from the vendor - do NOT accept the offer of a new key.(all they are trying to do is to get past the 45-day claims window. or avoid you sending the evidence of their crimes to the authorities)

    Please read the following stickies.... .................................

    http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/genuinewindows7/thread/a2444f34-0aff-4f29-a8ac-67e28b0c0285

    and

    http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/genuinewindows7/thread/309bb621-92d5-43d6-98c1-2bb51b35607f

    The pirates have got VERY good at this over the past few years, as the price of equipment for manufacturing the packages drops, and as factories open in less well-policed countries.

    see also this post....

    http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/genuinewindows7/thread/46a58748-5a64-41ff-b7f4-f6d3b47beca9


    Also - have a look at this video....


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzqNNiOM0c     


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Saturday, August 4, 2012 2:38 PM
    Moderator
  • Your Key is part of a Subscription service  pack available to developers - it CANNOT be resold. An MSDN subscription is expensive - but the profits that can be reaped from (illegally) selling the individual licenses are potentially huge.

    Whoever sold it to you has also illegally sold the same Key to many other people - and the Key has consequently been blocked.

    Yes, the Key was valid when originally sold, but as soon as anyone other than the owner of the full subscription installed that key on a system, the whole subscription technically became invalid.

    As for why it took so long to come to light, there are a number of possibilities.....

     Here's my standard spiel on the time-delays involved in tagging abused keys....

    For MSDN Keys:- MS can only act once a key hits a threshold (and they won't tell an outsider what that threshold is, understandably). They then have to put it through internal systems to ensure that all relevant parties are informed, just in case it's an oversight - then it enters the queue for the next update to the system.
    I have no idea how often the WAT checking system is updated, but I would suspect that it's no more than weekly because of admin and timing issues. The internal MS processes could therefore take easily a couple of months. It therefore depends on how close to the end of a vendors sales list you are, and how quickly he's selling them.
    The cannier ones will sell just enough to stay under the threshold for each product (MSDN subs include a huge number of products), until they've maximised the profits, then try and flood the market before disappearing into the sunset, laden with your cash.
    This could take anything up to a year or more.

     For products sold using a loader:- The loader gets around online activation by fooling the computer into thinking that the OS is installed onto the correct machine, by modifying certain files.
    Because of a number of factors, it's impossible to stop this, so MS came up with the WAT update - which has the ability to scan the relevant files, and detect the use of a loader tool. If the user fully updates the machine, including recommended updates and optional updates, then the WAT update is installed and starts work, and within 3 days, a loader-installed machine will get a notification.
    However, the WAT update is a voluntary one, at least at the first update run, and can be uninstalled, or refused The other time the WAT update is installed is when you validate Windows for some reason - it is part of the validation process, rather than the activation process. this time, it does the scan immediately, and again this will show as non-genuine if a Loader is present. If a user never needs/wants to validate, then they need never install the WAT update, and may never see a non-genuine notification.


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Saturday, August 4, 2012 3:13 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • The Key in use is an MSDN Key. Unless you are an MSDN subscriber, you are not entitled to use the Key – and whoever sold it to you was not entitled to do so.  Your Windows Key is from a not-for-resale MSDN account.  You need to claim an immediate refund from the vendor - do NOT accept the offer of a new key.(all they are trying to do is to get past the 45-day claims window. or avoid you sending the evidence of their crimes to the authorities)

    Please read the following stickies.... .................................

    http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/genuinewindows7/thread/a2444f34-0aff-4f29-a8ac-67e28b0c0285

    and

    http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/genuinewindows7/thread/309bb621-92d5-43d6-98c1-2bb51b35607f

    The pirates have got VERY good at this over the past few years, as the price of equipment for manufacturing the packages drops, and as factories open in less well-policed countries.

    see also this post....

    http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/genuinewindows7/thread/46a58748-5a64-41ff-b7f4-f6d3b47beca9


    Also - have a look at this video....


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzqNNiOM0c     


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Saturday, August 4, 2012 2:38 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for your response, however, as I stated in my post, after 21 months of use (24 since purchase)I have little chance of redress from the seller, assuming he is still in business and I have no idea what an MSDN Key is or MSDN subscriber is.

    Do I gather from this then, that my copy is probably a genuine one but some sort of Microsoft Licencing has been breached by someone?

    Many thanks


    Brian Emmerson

    Saturday, August 4, 2012 2:52 PM
  • Your Key is part of a Subscription service  pack available to developers - it CANNOT be resold. An MSDN subscription is expensive - but the profits that can be reaped from (illegally) selling the individual licenses are potentially huge.

    Whoever sold it to you has also illegally sold the same Key to many other people - and the Key has consequently been blocked.

    Yes, the Key was valid when originally sold, but as soon as anyone other than the owner of the full subscription installed that key on a system, the whole subscription technically became invalid.

    As for why it took so long to come to light, there are a number of possibilities.....

     Here's my standard spiel on the time-delays involved in tagging abused keys....

    For MSDN Keys:- MS can only act once a key hits a threshold (and they won't tell an outsider what that threshold is, understandably). They then have to put it through internal systems to ensure that all relevant parties are informed, just in case it's an oversight - then it enters the queue for the next update to the system.
    I have no idea how often the WAT checking system is updated, but I would suspect that it's no more than weekly because of admin and timing issues. The internal MS processes could therefore take easily a couple of months. It therefore depends on how close to the end of a vendors sales list you are, and how quickly he's selling them.
    The cannier ones will sell just enough to stay under the threshold for each product (MSDN subs include a huge number of products), until they've maximised the profits, then try and flood the market before disappearing into the sunset, laden with your cash.
    This could take anything up to a year or more.

     For products sold using a loader:- The loader gets around online activation by fooling the computer into thinking that the OS is installed onto the correct machine, by modifying certain files.
    Because of a number of factors, it's impossible to stop this, so MS came up with the WAT update - which has the ability to scan the relevant files, and detect the use of a loader tool. If the user fully updates the machine, including recommended updates and optional updates, then the WAT update is installed and starts work, and within 3 days, a loader-installed machine will get a notification.
    However, the WAT update is a voluntary one, at least at the first update run, and can be uninstalled, or refused The other time the WAT update is installed is when you validate Windows for some reason - it is part of the validation process, rather than the activation process. this time, it does the scan immediately, and again this will show as non-genuine if a Loader is present. If a user never needs/wants to validate, then they need never install the WAT update, and may never see a non-genuine notification.


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Saturday, August 4, 2012 3:13 PM
    Moderator
  • The issue isn't the "copy" of Windows.  It is all about the licensing.  If you purchased a retail box the entire box and all of its contents are counterfeit.  They are produced by the hundreds of thousands on excellent equipment in China and distributed to sellers who use eBay, the Amazon Marketplace, and "discount" sites. 

    Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) sells subscriptions to developers.  MSDN subscribers can then obtain product keys online via their subscriber account pages.  Each product key allows for activation on ten computers, meaning ten licenses are allowed per PK.  A subscriber is entitled to product keys for each edition of Windows, Office, Server, etc., so a subscriber can activate ten copies of Starter, Home Basic, Home Premium, Professional, Enterprise, and Ulimate, not to mention all the various editions of Office, and so on.  Add to that the fact that a subscriber may request additional product keys for each of those products and you can begin to see just how large the number is of product keys that can be harvested from a single subscription.  It gets worse.  The counterfeiters are obtaining the subscriptions via credit card fraud, etc.  That is what Noel is talking about when he says "the profits that can be reaped from (illegally) selling the individual licenses are potentially huge."

    The counterfeiters have been overselling each product key so the number of unsuspecting customers who activate the same key passes ten at some point.  Microsoft has not revealed how many over-activations it takes to get their attention but at some point the Activation Servers flag a product key for investigation.  I suspect that a wide geographical spread of IPs seeking activation can also be a factor that flags a key.  Then Microsoft has to investigate to make sure the key is actually being abused before blocking the key.  All of this takes time.  The unsuspecting user usually goes months and months before there is any indication of a problem.  Some event has to trigger a validation check, such as downloading XP Mode or another update or software that requires Microsoft Genuine Advantage.  This how your product key can be genuine and yet at some point invalid.

    The problem for both Microsoft and the victimized user is that Microsoft did not produce or sell your copy of Windows and has no more responsibility for it than does Rolex in the example you cited. But, like Rolex, Microsoft must make every effort to protect its copyrights by pursuing the counterfeiters, the illegal resellers, and the invalid licenses already in use.  The problem with your Rolex example is that Rolex has no way to paint your fake-Rolex face.  If they did they would or take some similar measure to render the counterfeit product unusable.  Counterfeit product certainly can be confiscated when discovered on sale.  The problem for Microsoft is that Windows is intellectual property and there is no way to track down all the installed copies and remove them.  Hence activation and validation as anti-piracy measures.

    Like the victim of any kind of fraud you are the one who is out the money and, in this case, you have no recourse to recover it.  I was irritated beyond words when I got caught by this fraud a couple of years ago.  There is nothing for it but to buy a copy of Windows from the Microsoft Store, Amazon Corp., or other well-known Microsoft partner and move on.  The unfortunate lesson is that once should NEVER buy Windows, Creative Studio, or any other expensive, licensed software from an individual seller online.  Individual sellers on places like eBay, Craigs List, the Amazon Marketplace, etc. do not have access to Microsoft's distribution channels so anything they are selling has to be suspect.  And, of course, if it looks too good to be true, it is. 


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 8GB ram.


    Saturday, August 4, 2012 5:37 PM
    Answerer