locked
Windows Home Server not all there RRS feed

  • Question

  •  I'm setting up a newly purchased "barebones PC" configured as follows:

    ECS GF6100-M754 Mobo
    AMD Sempron Processor 754 3300+, 2Gig RAM
    HP DVD Writer
    2 SATA 1TB Drives (Seagate Barracuda 7200/32MB/SATA-3G)
    NO floppy drive

    I have configured the bios for RAID enabled (they can be disabled or enabled, but there appears to be no option for IDE emulation).

    The drives were initally configured in RAID 1 array, bootable.

    Windows Home Server prompts on installation "Windows Home Server installation failed. Would you like to load additional storage drivers?"

    I subsequently used nLite to create my own boot disk for Windows Home Server w PowerPack1.  I then booted my new machine with the nLited DVD, and the installation went without problem.  After installing, the software guided me to go through a series of updates from WIndows Update.

    Once that finished, I attempted to connect from a PC in my home network using the Home Connector software.  It doesn't work.  I have taken down anti-virus, firewall, etc., and these don't appear to be the problem.  On further examination, back on my Home Server, I noticed that not much software appears to be installed on the server.

    Is it possible my nLited version did not install correctly?  How do I know if my server install actually installed everything it needed to?  Is there a way to pick up after it left off, etc??

    Help!  I'm a few weeks into this and this software seems to be more effort than its worth, as compared to the competing NAS alternatives.

    Thanks,

    Dave
    Friday, November 28, 2008 5:39 PM

Answers

  • I decided to give it one more try, after reading POSTS from folks that did this successfully.  It seems a hardware raid would be better than anything software can do as part of the OS, but guess that's debateable.  I installed using the original WHS install disc, and used my USB-Floppy drive, with the drivers loaded on a floppy.  The WHS installation happened without a hitch.  I'm still wondering why an nLite version integrating the new drivers didn't actually do more than install a base Win 2003 server operating system, but going at it this way sure did.  Everything runs perfectly - so far - including finding the WHS from a remote PC.  Wish me luck!
    • Marked as answer by DaveLM Sunday, November 30, 2008 5:36 PM
    Saturday, November 29, 2008 8:16 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    WHS doesn't support any form of RAID, and as you have found, is extremely difficult to even get it installed. Because this is deprecated by Microsoft, it mean that in effect, your on your own.
    However, if you use the search function, you will find a number of people who have managed to get it working, but it will depend on the RAID functionality you may have. Also, note that if you ever have a server failure, using RAID could well cause problems when attempting a Restore.
    You will need to check the other threads, but as a start, you did ensure that all drivers required were installed twice, once for the Graphical portion and then again during the Text mode portion.

    Colin




    If anyone answers your query successfully, please mark it as 'Helpful', to guide other users.
    Friday, November 28, 2008 6:25 PM
    Moderator
  • No idea, if your nlite configuration mucked up with the installation scripts.
    Do you see the console if logging in locally to the server?
    Did you get the greeting asking you for setting the console password?

    Enabling RAID as SATA mode is one of the best chances to get WHS setup to fail.
    If I see the reviews of the motherboard, your choice was not very lucky, and you could have run into problems with any other OS.

    About the value of the software and the needed efforts: WHS in its original concept is not meaned to be sold to end users as software, but as appliance (preinstalled on hardware).

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Friday, November 28, 2008 6:32 PM
    Moderator
  • DaveLM said:

     I'm setting up a newly purchased "barebones PC" configured as follows:

    ECS GF6100-M754 Mobo
    AMD Sempron Processor 754 3300+, 2Gig RAM
    HP DVD Writer
    2 SATA 1TB Drives (Seagate Barracuda 7200/32MB/SATA-3G)
    NO floppy drive

    I have configured the bios for RAID enabled (they can be disabled or enabled, but there appears to be no option for IDE emulation).

    The drives were initally configured in RAID 1 array, bootable.

    Windows Home Server prompts on installation "Windows Home Server installation failed. Would you like to load additional storage drivers?"

    I subsequently used nLite to create my own boot disk for Windows Home Server w PowerPack1.  I then booted my new machine with the nLited DVD, and the installation went without problem.  After installing, the software guided me to go through a series of updates from WIndows Update.

    Once that finished, I attempted to connect from a PC in my home network using the Home Connector software.  It doesn't work.  I have taken down anti-virus, firewall, etc., and these don't appear to be the problem.  On further examination, back on my Home Server, I noticed that not much software appears to be installed on the server.

    Is it possible my nLited version did not install correctly?  How do I know if my server install actually installed everything it needed to?  Is there a way to pick up after it left off, etc??

    Help!  I'm a few weeks into this and this software seems to be more effort than its worth, as compared to the competing NAS alternatives.

    Thanks,

    Dave


    I would think it's possible.  I would try again and do a normal installation (do not use RAID at all).  If you can't get the drives into an IDE-compatible mode, you will almost definitely need a floppy drive to install the drivers for the controller card.
    Friday, November 28, 2008 7:05 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for your comments.  As for what WHS was designed for, certainly Microsoft goes out of its way selling to the end consumer, re: http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/windowshomeserver/default.mspx

    I'm not here to discuss relative merits of build it yourself or packaged solution.  I've had no difficulties installing other operating systems on this PC configuration/MoBo and unqualified opinions based on 3rd party reviews, re: "Lucky or un" are, well....  Please, let's move on.

    I'll try to isolate by going to IDE mode.  If that works, then at least its a start.  Kind of defeats the purpose.  I thought a hardware-based RAID mirror would be invisible to the OS - appearing like a single drive.

    Thanks again,

    Dave
    Saturday, November 29, 2008 4:59 PM
  • DaveLM said:

    Thanks for your comments.  As for what WHS was designed for, certainly Microsoft goes out of its way selling to the end consumer, re: http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/windowshomeserver/default.mspx

    I'm not here to discuss relative merits of build it yourself or packaged solution.  I've had no difficulties installing other operating systems on this PC configuration/MoBo and unqualified opinions based on 3rd party reviews, re: "Lucky or un" are, well....  Please, let's move on.

    I'll try to isolate by going to IDE mode.  If that works, then at least its a start.  Kind of defeats the purpose.  I thought a hardware-based RAID mirror would be invisible to the OS - appearing like a single drive.

    Thanks again,

    Dave


    It is possible to use hardware RAID on the server, but its unsupported.  If you want to go that route anyway, that's your decision.  Just don't expect MS to help you down the line if something goes wrong. :)  Also, RAID isn't really necessary on WHS if you let it do it's job.  It has Folder Duplication (which most closely resembles RAID 1).  When you turn on FD on a share, it automatically stores 2 copies of each file in that share on 2 different drives.  And if you are worried about your primary drive failing and losing your OS, all you need to do is replace the primary drive and perform a Server Reinstallation.  It's a special install mode that will lay down a new OS partition, but keep all of your data in tact.
    Saturday, November 29, 2008 5:21 PM
    Moderator
  • Ok - Like I said, I'll try the IDE mode route and alert if there are any problems as a result.
    Saturday, November 29, 2008 5:43 PM
  • I decided to give it one more try, after reading POSTS from folks that did this successfully.  It seems a hardware raid would be better than anything software can do as part of the OS, but guess that's debateable.  I installed using the original WHS install disc, and used my USB-Floppy drive, with the drivers loaded on a floppy.  The WHS installation happened without a hitch.  I'm still wondering why an nLite version integrating the new drivers didn't actually do more than install a base Win 2003 server operating system, but going at it this way sure did.  Everything runs perfectly - so far - including finding the WHS from a remote PC.  Wish me luck!
    • Marked as answer by DaveLM Sunday, November 30, 2008 5:36 PM
    Saturday, November 29, 2008 8:16 PM
  • Two years later, using a raid card to manage my WHS raid system, I did have a failure.  I was able to come back up without much of a hitch.  Experience with RAID on WHS = 100% satisfaction.

     

    My WHS 2011 server is built on a more sophisticated motherboard and I'm using that RAID architecture.  I expect to be just as satisfied, in the event of failures. Note:  I also do quarterly (it is a home server for me, afterall, so daily/weekly not needed) backups to a USB drive I have offsite, and I have a 3rd spare drive that's sitting there for "just in time" replacement, if needed.  given the costs of the drives, I went for it!

     

    Dave

    Friday, October 14, 2011 4:43 AM
  • Oh - one more comment.  It does appear that WHS 2011 supports hardware RAID now, though it may be enabled by the motherboard's software.  I installed the server, then purposefully crashed one of the drives.  Took it and formatted it and plugged it back in.  After WHS successfully booted up on the one good drive, the OS automatically rebuilt the second drive.

     

    Cheers

     

    Dave

    Friday, October 14, 2011 4:47 AM