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Activation Request after Drive Failure RRS feed

  • Question

  • A few minutes ago, a hard drive containing the Swap Files crashed temporarily.

    After reboot, OS said my hardware had changed too much... Drive was still not up.

    After another reboot drive ok.  OS still asking me to "get genuine"....?

    Let's just "get Real"...  

    You (Microsft) have made it Expressly difficult to re-enter valid keys.  My first option should be that.  I shouldnt have to visit any site (should my machine be stand-alone).

    This truely is the most rediculous boner MS has pulled yet.

    Now ... How DO I FIX YOUR ERROR....?

     

    Sunday, June 4, 2006 5:46 PM

Answers

  •  

    The article was very very informative, Thank you.

    (I didnt think there was a practical application for 'fuzzy' logic.)

    Thank you very much for your considerate help.

     

    Thursday, June 8, 2006 1:17 PM

All replies

  •  DeltaQ wrote:

    A few minutes ago, a hard drive containing the Swap Files crashed temporarily.

    After reboot, OS said my hardware had changed too much... Drive was still not up.

    After another reboot drive ok.  OS still asking me to "get genuine"....?

    Let's just "get Real"...  

    You (Microsft) have made it Expressly difficult to re-enter valid keys.  My first option should be that.  I shouldnt have to visit any site (should my machine be stand-alone).

    This truely is the most rediculous boner MS has pulled yet.

    Now ... How DO I FIX YOUR ERROR....?

     

    DeltaQ:

    I would recommend using the disk drive manufacturer's downloadable diagnostic tools to carefully analyze the disk.  Once a disk crashes it is suspect and the burden of proof of its integrity is on the disk itself.

    It's possible for seemingly minor changes to a system's hardware to "set off" the Product Activation (PA) system's "alarm."  This is becasue hardware changes are cummulative, and the last change, meaning the apparent  removal of a disk, was the last vote needed to exceed the limit built into PA.  And it would appear that when the disk returned, that event was seen by PA as not a "negative vote" that would roll back the limit being reached, rather it may have been seen by PA as an additional hardware change.

    If the system is displaying the "sotware counterfeiting" nage screens, please start with Step 1 below:

    Step 1 is to download and run the utility at this link http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012, then click Validation, Copy to Clipboard, then paste the report into a response message in this thread.

    Step 2 is to look on the computer to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticty (COA).  If you have one, tell us about the COA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4.  DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for?  Click here:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

     

    Monday, June 5, 2006 2:04 PM
  • Per request, WGADiag clip trails.

    While I'm aware of the importance of the CoA, I can't seem to find it.  It appears I have everything but.  My version of XP Pro is an upgrade via retail purchase.  Original Product folder, Disc & key are still intact.  The Product key does match (partialy) what WGA reports.

    It is imperative that this be prevented in the future.  Due to power supply & connector issues and input device changes, my system fails with regularity... only temporary , but fairly frequently. 

    As a developer, I also need to stay current and "on the grid", but cannot 'rely' on any network or internet connection.  I only happen to have a connection at this time.  ie. I need to be able to fix this without outside help. 

    While I use auto update... I also count on it NOT to bugger an already tempermental system.  It is the culpret... delivering to me what I MUST consider MALWARE.

    As a developer, I understand Microsofts need for protection, but this is not the 'condum' kind of protection... it's the 'gun' kind, and MS is shooting everyone... including itself. 

    WGA Diagnostic Data (1.5.0530.2):
    --------------------
    Genuine Validation Status: Not Activated
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-RFCVX-7W32D-QGGC7
    Windows Product Key Hash: o94hlmArY0qQENehCjq33i3GUsw=
    Windows Product ID: 55276-012-9271261-22550
    Windows Product ID Type: 5
    Windows License Type: Retail
    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.2.0.pro
    Download Center code: Expired code.
    ID: f267d246-0954-4415-b143-5e2e691b0fce
    Is Admin: Yes
    AutoDial: No
    Registry: 0x0
    WGA Version: Registered, 1.5.532.0.
    Signature Type: Microsoft.
    Validation Diagnostic:

    Scan: Complete
    Cryptography: Complete

    Office Status: 109
    Office Diagnostics:

    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 7.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Prompt
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>f267d246-0954-4415-b143-5e2e691b0fce</UGUID><Version>1.5.0530.2</Version><OS>5.1.2600.2.00010100.2.0.pro</OS><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-QGGC7</PKey><PID>55276-012-9271261-22550</PID><PIDType>5</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-789336058-1229272821-1417001333</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>ABIT </Manufacturer><Model>6A69SA19</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Award Software International, Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>6.00 PG</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="2"/><Date>20011015000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>AD0D3EEF0184D14A</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Pacific Standard Time(GMT-08:00)</TimeZone></MachineData>   <Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Monday, June 5, 2006 3:06 PM
  • DeltaQ,

    Ah, you have a retail installation.  Retail installations of XP do not provide a COA that can be affixed to the computer, only OEM.  The retail COA is actually on the "boxtop" of the pretty Windows XP box you purchased from the retailer.

    Since your Product Keys seem to be matching up, I doubt there is much chance that we are dealing with bad licensing, just a Product Activation situation brought on by HDD technical difficulties.

    The cure could be as simple as activating XP.  Start>All Programs>Accessories>System Tools>Activate Windows.

    If that menu choice is not present, activate this way:  Start>Run, type "oobe/msoobe.exe /a" without the quotes, click OK.

    Assuming activation is successful, next visit this site to validate:  http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/downloads/Validate.aspx?displaylang=en

    Let us know.....

    Monday, June 5, 2006 3:25 PM
  • Thank you... for dealing with my spewing as well as the solution.

    I guess I assumed the CoA would be within the product; not on the box.  Box is usually the first item in trash for me... then the directions.

    I was able to activate windows, but only if I registered as well.  Activation without registration failed on last step... can't remember what it was.

    My drive failures seam to be power related and, to this point, benign.  I have changed boot and swap file drives several times.  My concern is still valid though, how often will this happen: i.e. how many changes (or drive failures) can I make to my system before this occurs again.  This machine will soon become a static test bed, but I also anticipate hardware failures from time to time through the years to come.

     

    Tuesday, June 6, 2006 2:55 PM
  • Delta@,

    You're welcome

    Here is one of the better articles on Product Activation, and in the middle it has several paragraphs that will be of great interest to you:  http://www.aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.php

    You might be at the point where a free email tech support incident is your best next step.  If so, here's the link:  http://support.microsoft.com/oas/default.aspx?Gprid=9860

    Tuesday, June 6, 2006 4:48 PM
  •  

    The article was very very informative, Thank you.

    (I didnt think there was a practical application for 'fuzzy' logic.)

    Thank you very much for your considerate help.

     

    Thursday, June 8, 2006 1:17 PM
  • DeltaQ,

    You're welcome!  Best of luck in the future.

    Thursday, June 8, 2006 3:31 PM