locked
Says I have a VLK, try to change the key and it says the one I use is "blocked" RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi I am working on a customers machine, and when I went to do updates (SP1... YIKES!) It said it needed validated, so I went through that whole process. afterward it said it was using a VLK. So I download the key changer tool from your site, and attempt to change it to the one listed on the bottom of the laptop, on an official license key sticker, and It said something like that key has been "blocked". so I'm guessing what happened here is this: Customer brought computer in for service at "shady computers Inc."Mr.Shady-Repairman switches out her lisence key for one of his cheaper VLK's. Mr.Shady-Repairman uses it on one of his machines and/or sells it.

    Sooo... why don't we flip the buck and lock that computer registered with that key out, and give the key back to its rightful owner, eh?

    please tell me what her options are  from here, and no I don't want to buy any more keys, this is Microsofts fault for a flawed system.


    I can also provide photographic evidence that this is the rightful computer for that product key too.

    p.s. Why isn't the Windows Activation Center phone number listed anywhere on the internet? I spent an hour or so looking for it (because I didn't want to reinstall her system)

    p.p.s. If its hidden by Microsoft, will they pay me off to take it down from my site if I list it? Just kidding!

    http://www.samswitzer.org
    Tuesday, February 17, 2009 5:51 PM

Answers

  • Good Morning Swizzler,

    Thank you for posting in the Windows Genuine Advantage Forum Swizzler. First I would like to ask have you compared the Certificate of Authenticity "COA" sticker against the actual operating system which is currently installed? This is very important because there are different product keys for the different versions of Windows. Product keys used for Windows XP Professional will not work for Windows XP Home edition and so forth. The COA sticker located on the bottom of your customer's laptop is an OEM-SLP version of Windows XP installed. Let me explain what OEM-SLP is:

    Computers built by large commercial manufacturers that come with Vista Pre-installed come with two (2) Product Keys; SLP and COA Key
    .  SLP stands for System Locked Pre-install. OEM manufacturer’s add an OEM identifier string to the system BIOS during manufacturing. Windows verifies this identifier during the boot process. In this way the end user will not be required to activate Windows. The OEM SLP Key is geared to work with the special instructions found on that Manufacturer’s computer hardware.  The Product Key is available on the COA sticker and not installed in the computer. For example all DELL OEM SLP Windows Vista systems use a single product key but the COA sticker on the machine contains the unique COA. The key located on the COA sticker should only be used in limited situations and requires telephone activation. Example should you require to reformate the computer the key from the COA sticker would be used. 

    Right now you do have a few options available. First the customer may purchase the WGA Kit which was presented when the computer failed validation. The cost is $149 or half of what the original cost. The customer could purchase an OEM System Builder Kit of Vista. The customer can file a piracy report by visiting http://www.microsoft.com/piracy. Last option is to visit the laptop's manufacturer Technical support section and request them to send you the original OEM SLP software. 


    Thank you,


    Stephen

    Stephen Holm
    • Marked as answer by Stephen Holm Tuesday, February 17, 2009 6:44 PM
    Tuesday, February 17, 2009 6:44 PM
  • Swizzler,

    Did you check the COA sticker located on the bottom of the laptop? Currently the laptop is licensed to run the operating system which is physically located on the COA identified on the laptop unless your customer has previously purchased a retail or OEM System Builder version. Should you need assistance identifying the various COAs please visit
    http://www.howtotell.com


    Please run the Microsoft Genuine Advantage Diagnostic Test (MGADT) so that I may analyze the results.

    By clicking the link below, you will download the MGADT.  Then click the Run button. Then click the Run button again. Then click the Continue button to perform the diagnostic. The Windows tab should show, click the Copy button to paste your report to the clipboard.  Then paste the report into a New Post on this Forum by adding a post in it and pressing Ctrl V (to paste the text). Clicking the OK button will clear the Diagnostic window. Here is the download link:

     http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012

    Please tell us about the Certificate of Authenticity (COA) for your copy of Windows XP.

    1. What edition/version of Windows XP is titled?

    ·         Home

    ·         Professional

    ·         Media Center

    2. Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3. Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4. Please provide the customer scenario you are experiencing.

    5. DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for, see this page to reference your COA:

    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/product.aspx?pID=2abf99cd-a5e4-469c-802e-55ca8ec542d5&cID=ea710cad-37b0-4975-bcd6-abfee19961df&method=oem&displaylang=en

    NOTE: The data collected with the Microsoft Genuine Advantage Diagnostic Tool does NOT contain any information that can personally identify you. The information can be fully reviewed, by you, before being posted.

    Thank you


    Stephen


    Stephen Holm
    • Marked as answer by Stephen Holm Wednesday, February 18, 2009 5:01 PM
    Tuesday, February 17, 2009 9:02 PM

All replies

  • Good Morning Swizzler,

    Thank you for posting in the Windows Genuine Advantage Forum Swizzler. First I would like to ask have you compared the Certificate of Authenticity "COA" sticker against the actual operating system which is currently installed? This is very important because there are different product keys for the different versions of Windows. Product keys used for Windows XP Professional will not work for Windows XP Home edition and so forth. The COA sticker located on the bottom of your customer's laptop is an OEM-SLP version of Windows XP installed. Let me explain what OEM-SLP is:

    Computers built by large commercial manufacturers that come with Vista Pre-installed come with two (2) Product Keys; SLP and COA Key
    .  SLP stands for System Locked Pre-install. OEM manufacturer’s add an OEM identifier string to the system BIOS during manufacturing. Windows verifies this identifier during the boot process. In this way the end user will not be required to activate Windows. The OEM SLP Key is geared to work with the special instructions found on that Manufacturer’s computer hardware.  The Product Key is available on the COA sticker and not installed in the computer. For example all DELL OEM SLP Windows Vista systems use a single product key but the COA sticker on the machine contains the unique COA. The key located on the COA sticker should only be used in limited situations and requires telephone activation. Example should you require to reformate the computer the key from the COA sticker would be used. 

    Right now you do have a few options available. First the customer may purchase the WGA Kit which was presented when the computer failed validation. The cost is $149 or half of what the original cost. The customer could purchase an OEM System Builder Kit of Vista. The customer can file a piracy report by visiting http://www.microsoft.com/piracy. Last option is to visit the laptop's manufacturer Technical support section and request them to send you the original OEM SLP software. 


    Thank you,


    Stephen

    Stephen Holm
    • Marked as answer by Stephen Holm Tuesday, February 17, 2009 6:44 PM
    Tuesday, February 17, 2009 6:44 PM
  • ok, I just double checked and XP Pro was installed on this machine, I'll get in contact with the owner and see if they have the pro product key, if they do what then? Is there a way to validate the software on this machine?
    http://www.samswitzer.org
    Tuesday, February 17, 2009 6:58 PM
  • Swizzler,

    Did you check the COA sticker located on the bottom of the laptop? Currently the laptop is licensed to run the operating system which is physically located on the COA identified on the laptop unless your customer has previously purchased a retail or OEM System Builder version. Should you need assistance identifying the various COAs please visit
    http://www.howtotell.com


    Please run the Microsoft Genuine Advantage Diagnostic Test (MGADT) so that I may analyze the results.

    By clicking the link below, you will download the MGADT.  Then click the Run button. Then click the Run button again. Then click the Continue button to perform the diagnostic. The Windows tab should show, click the Copy button to paste your report to the clipboard.  Then paste the report into a New Post on this Forum by adding a post in it and pressing Ctrl V (to paste the text). Clicking the OK button will clear the Diagnostic window. Here is the download link:

     http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012

    Please tell us about the Certificate of Authenticity (COA) for your copy of Windows XP.

    1. What edition/version of Windows XP is titled?

    ·         Home

    ·         Professional

    ·         Media Center

    2. Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3. Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4. Please provide the customer scenario you are experiencing.

    5. DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for, see this page to reference your COA:

    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/product.aspx?pID=2abf99cd-a5e4-469c-802e-55ca8ec542d5&cID=ea710cad-37b0-4975-bcd6-abfee19961df&method=oem&displaylang=en

    NOTE: The data collected with the Microsoft Genuine Advantage Diagnostic Tool does NOT contain any information that can personally identify you. The information can be fully reviewed, by you, before being posted.

    Thank you


    Stephen


    Stephen Holm
    • Marked as answer by Stephen Holm Wednesday, February 18, 2009 5:01 PM
    Tuesday, February 17, 2009 9:02 PM
  • Swizzler121,

    The best course of action you can take for your customer is to assist them in acquiring from the computer's manufacturer the genuine Recovery CDs/DVDs that go with that computer, and to use those discs to do a fresh clean installation of the right version and editon of Windows onto their computer.  The CoA on the bottom of the laptop is of course the way to know the properly licensed version and edition of Windows.

    Many major manufacturers offer a way to acquire the Recovery discs.  If they are not available from the manufacturer, you can try third party providers such as www.restoredisks.com.
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Wednesday, February 18, 2009 3:50 AM