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Why is there no analogue to exam 70-536 in the .Net 4.0 certification path? RRS feed

  • Question

  • It seems to me that the material on 70-536 is fundamental and I'm wondering why this base level of knowledge is no longer required to achieve certification?
    Saturday, October 9, 2010 12:11 AM

Answers

  • Many of us have voiced our concerns on this subject before. It is a pity that no equivalent exam exists for the Framework 4.0.  70-536 covered the fundamentals about the Framework itself, which were important when programming any kind of applications under .Net. Regrettably, there is no alternative that covers the same basics under the new series of 4.0 certifications.

     

    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, October 21, 2010 3:28 PM
    Saturday, October 9, 2010 4:47 PM
  • When those concerns were raised was any rationale given for excluding these topics? Many important topics don't appear to be included in the current syllabus set. Take the type system and reflection as an example. Any basic education of the .Net framework would include coverage of these topics yet apparently one could achieve certification without knowing anything about how to query/interpret type metadata. This doesn't seem right and I'm really curious as to why such framework topics were neglected.

    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, October 21, 2010 3:28 PM
    Sunday, October 10, 2010 9:13 PM
  • This very same question I was asking 1 month ago in this thread: http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en/CertGeneral/thread/b2d9bf28-0f6b-4389-9ded-62edc0e5b356

    Basically the answer was that OOP and .NET framework are old enough to be learned in high school (yea right, that's why students knowledge is declining and they finish school without knowing basic algebra).

    In reality there will be so called certified ASP.NET 4.0 experts who will build websites by using ArrayLists and copy pasting code from one page to another without ever thinking of using a class, library etc. why should they know the difference between double and decimal ? They can just use decimal all the time even it's so much slower. Let alone reflection which will be rocket science to them.

    Hopefully the people at Microsoft will soon realize that this was a huge mistake and fix in the next framework version exams.

     

    I have decided to take the hard route myself by getting certified in 3.5 and only after that I'll go for 4.0. There are so many things that you can learn from studying for 70-536. Things you may never run into otherwise when building an ASP.NET website but which opens a lot of new horizons once you know about them.

    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, October 21, 2010 3:29 PM
    Sunday, October 10, 2010 11:29 PM
  • Hi

    From my point of view all the .Net platform still based on the .Net framwork 2.0 kernel, in security reflection text collections and so forth


    The complexity resides in the simplicity
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, October 21, 2010 3:29 PM
    Thursday, October 14, 2010 7:56 PM

All replies

  • Many of us have voiced our concerns on this subject before. It is a pity that no equivalent exam exists for the Framework 4.0.  70-536 covered the fundamentals about the Framework itself, which were important when programming any kind of applications under .Net. Regrettably, there is no alternative that covers the same basics under the new series of 4.0 certifications.

     

    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, October 21, 2010 3:28 PM
    Saturday, October 9, 2010 4:47 PM
  • When those concerns were raised was any rationale given for excluding these topics? Many important topics don't appear to be included in the current syllabus set. Take the type system and reflection as an example. Any basic education of the .Net framework would include coverage of these topics yet apparently one could achieve certification without knowing anything about how to query/interpret type metadata. This doesn't seem right and I'm really curious as to why such framework topics were neglected.

    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, October 21, 2010 3:28 PM
    Sunday, October 10, 2010 9:13 PM
  • This very same question I was asking 1 month ago in this thread: http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en/CertGeneral/thread/b2d9bf28-0f6b-4389-9ded-62edc0e5b356

    Basically the answer was that OOP and .NET framework are old enough to be learned in high school (yea right, that's why students knowledge is declining and they finish school without knowing basic algebra).

    In reality there will be so called certified ASP.NET 4.0 experts who will build websites by using ArrayLists and copy pasting code from one page to another without ever thinking of using a class, library etc. why should they know the difference between double and decimal ? They can just use decimal all the time even it's so much slower. Let alone reflection which will be rocket science to them.

    Hopefully the people at Microsoft will soon realize that this was a huge mistake and fix in the next framework version exams.

     

    I have decided to take the hard route myself by getting certified in 3.5 and only after that I'll go for 4.0. There are so many things that you can learn from studying for 70-536. Things you may never run into otherwise when building an ASP.NET website but which opens a lot of new horizons once you know about them.

    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, October 21, 2010 3:29 PM
    Sunday, October 10, 2010 11:29 PM
  • Well, I read the thread you referenced and the "justification" for exluding the material and, honestly, it rings hollow. It seems to me that it would be entirely possible for someone to earn a certification and yet not have a solid grounding in framework fundamentals - knowledge that any competent .Net developer is presumed to have. So, yes, I guess this "simplifies" the certification path but at the expense of foundational knowledge.
    Monday, October 11, 2010 9:40 PM
  • Hi

    From my point of view all the .Net platform still based on the .Net framwork 2.0 kernel, in security reflection text collections and so forth


    The complexity resides in the simplicity
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, October 21, 2010 3:29 PM
    Thursday, October 14, 2010 7:56 PM