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ICE and WIndows 10

    Question

  • When trying to install ICE on computer with Windows 10, I get the following error message, "This Installation Package is not supported by this processor type. Contact your product vendor."

    Admittedly, the processor on this computer is a few years old, but it operates everything else I have, including Photoshop.

    Is this a compatibility issue with Win 10?

    Saturday, March 5, 2016 7:32 PM

Answers

  • Hi, NatureTraveler.

    I'm only your fellow user, but I can tell you that what that error message means is that you are attempting to run a 64-bit version of ICE on a 32-bit processor or 32-bit version of Windows.

    Download the 32-bit installer for ICE and try to install that.

    Sunday, March 6, 2016 11:41 PM

All replies

  • Hi, NatureTraveler.

    I'm only your fellow user, but I can tell you that what that error message means is that you are attempting to run a 64-bit version of ICE on a 32-bit processor or 32-bit version of Windows.

    Download the 32-bit installer for ICE and try to install that.

    Sunday, March 6, 2016 11:41 PM
  • Hi, NateLawrence,

    You hit the nail right on the head.  I did download the 32 bit version, and it downloaded, installed and works.  Now the really funny thing is I am sure my machine is a 64 bit processor, because I built it.  However, I do not argue with success.  I can't explain it, but it works, so who cares?  Thanks, again.

    Monday, March 7, 2016 3:32 AM
  • Hi NateLawrence

    Even if your processor is 64 bit, it will not be able to run 64 bit software, if you have installed a 32 bit version of Windows - which I assume must be the case.

    Monday, March 7, 2016 3:57 PM
  • Interesting you  say that.  I had checked the processor from the Win10 Settings screen before I started all this.  It was a 64 bit processor, but you are right in  that  the OS is 32 bit Win 10.  So that was the issue all along.
    Tuesday, March 8, 2016 1:14 AM
  • Yeah, you'll need a 64-bit Windows 10 install media to install 64-bit Windows (which unfortunately for you will involve backing up all your data to an external/non-system drive and then re-installing all of your applications after you complete installation of 64-bit Windows if you intend to ever utilize more than 4 gigabytes of RAM.

    The 32-bit address space is 4 gigabytes large so when the operating system is 32-bit, that means that the OS itself can only read 4GB of RAM and then dole out portions of that to 32-bit or 16-bit applications.

    By default in Windows, that means that Windows keeps 2GB of physical RAM for itself and system processes and it will divide the remaining 2GB of physical RAM which it is capable of reading among whatever files and applications you open (assuming that your PC does have at least 4GB of RAM installed).

    ::

    Virtual Memory / Paging Files

    Back in the '90s as people's hard drives were getting bigger faster than our RAM, operating system vendors began to give us the option to use part of our hard disk as fake RAM - thereby enabling software back then to take advantage of the full 4GB 32-bit address space back when virtually no consumer would have had 4GB or RAM.

    This means that Windows can give each 32-bit application a 'virtual' 4GB of RAM, but whatever doesn't fit in the 2GB of physical RAM has to be saved to the paging file on your hard disk(s). The process of juggling things that haven't been used recently out of physical RAM and into the paging file and snatching things out of the paging file and back into real RAM has traditionally been quite a bottleneck, simply because of the slow read/write rate of hard disks (but this bottleneck is lessened to some extent if you have a massive SSD installed for storage which you ask Windows to use for Virtual Memory).

    ::

    64-bit

    The primary advantage that 64-bit has over 32-bit is a much larger address space.
    The 64-bit address space is (according to Wikipedia) 16 exibytes. 
    That's equal to 4 million sets of 4GB of RAM mathematically addressable by a 64-bit OS/program.

    So far no individual has that much hard disk storage, much less RAM and so operating systems have temporarily chosen to support smaller amounts of RAM, since most people are not yet able to afford 4TB of RAM

    In the short term, though, suffice it to say that having greater than 4 gigabytes of physical RAM allows a 64-bit operating system to give 32-bit applications a real physical 4GB of RAM (provided that the OS and other applications and files are not using it) and allows 64-bit programs to act as though they had a considerably larger amount of RAM than you actually have, provided that you are willing to dedicate hard disk space to Virtual Memory/a paging file, but that puts you back into the game of swapping things in and out of RAM as you need it, although on a much larger scale.

    Anyway, I'm getting carried away but a higher number of bit processor, operating system, or runtime can run equal or lower bit operating systems, runtimes, or applications. (e.g. a 64-bit processor can run a 32-bit operating system, runtime, or application) 

    The inverse, however, is not true. 
    This is to say that a 32-bit runtime can no more run a 64-bit application, nor can a 32-bit operating system run a 64-bit application or runtime, any more than a 32-bit processor run 64-bit applications or runtimes or applications (which is to say not at all, as I'm sure you know). 


    Monday, March 14, 2016 1:39 AM